Traditional recipes

Washington, DC New Menu Report: Inauguration Edition

Washington, DC New Menu Report: Inauguration Edition

This week all across the District, people will either be gleefully celebrating their candidate’s win and dining like it's 1999, or they will be drowning their sorrows in carbs, sweets, and booze. And on Saturday, the more proactive groups will be joining the Women’s March on Washington. We have a few dining options for them, too.

Here’s the thing: We’re a food and drink website so, either way, we’re focused on the food related to the events. D.C. finally has food scene worth writing about, and we’re surrounded by brewers, distillers, new food retailers, independent chefs, and local eateries just waiting to benefit from anyone, not just the winning side. There are discounts, Women’s March specials, and inauguration-themed foods and drinks. Let’s get real here. This is a town that changes its dance card every four years, and Washingtonians are used to transient living. Let’s deal with it the best way we know how: with a drink in one hand and a phone in the other so we can snag a reservation at our favorite eatery.

Here are some suggestions of where to go and what to eat and drink.

Alfa Pie House

This fun little Greek place on H Street has some specials for Inauguration Day that are super cheap. On Friday, Jan. 20, Alfa Pie House will be selling eight-ounce eye-opening servings of La Colombe coffee and just-baked mini phyllo pies for only $1.20, and at lunchtime, grab two small soups, two side salads, and two regular-sized phyllo pies for $20.17. Opa!

Art and Soul

Just two blocks from the Capitol, Art and Soul is tenting and heating its patio from Jan. 18 to 22, perfect if you brave the cold to watch the swearing-in ceremony or just want to commiserate with like-minded people. In addition to offering the regular menu, the pop-up lounge will be serving boozy hot chocolate selections (to stay, you booze hounds) and virgin hot chocolate to go. There will also be cozy cocktails like hot buttered rum, honeyed bourbon hot toddy, and hot spiced wine, along with some cute snacks and hand warmers.

Bar Dupont

This chic hotel bar believes in doing just a few things really well. For the arrival of the new administration and staff, Bar Dupont created a one-of-a-kind special welcome cocktail called “A District Welcome.” It’s available until Feb. 6, and made with District Distilling Co. Checkerbank gin, Capitoline rosé vermouth, Don Ciccio & Figli nocino, amaro Montenegro, and lemon. ($12)

Bar Pilar

Bar Pilar has chosen to accentuate the positive and ignore the negative for Inauguration Day by throwing a “Thanks, Obama” party on Jan. 20 starting at 11 a.m. The drinks specials play on the theme and include Hawaiian tiki cocktails and other drinks made with Malört, a wormwood spirit iconic in bars across Chicago. The kitchen will open up early and start serving snacks at 3:30 p.m. and then regular dinner hours begin at 5 p.m.

McClellan’s Retreat

This week through Inauguration Day, Friday, Jan. 20, McClellan’s Retreat will open early at 1 p.m. and serve the Penicillin cocktail, a Civil War-era cocktail that you can bet will fix what ails you. It’s made with Pig’s Nose blended Scotch whisky, but if you prefer, choose from the complete list of beer, wine, and liquor. And if you get caught up in the tasting experiment, you can stay a bit longer on Friday; McClellan’s will be open until 2 a.m. Wednesday and Thursday, and 3 a.m. on Friday.

Policy Restaurant & Lounge

Who says you can’t have happy hour on the weekend? Policy Restaurant & Lounge is offering a special happy hour on Saturday, Jan. 21, from 5 to 7 p.m., in honor of the Women's March on Washington. The special menu includes beer specials starting at just $4.50, wines at $5.50, and cocktails $6.50. If all that marching gave you an appetite, executive chef Lonnie Zoeller has created a few small bites including shrimp empanadas and pork belly chicharron.

Quarter + Glory

Not everyone needs an all-day cocktail bar, but when you do the place to go is Quarter + Glory, a classic American cocktail bar that oozes style. It’s serving cocktail specials beginning Friday, Jan. 20, and all weekend long. The plan is to usher in the 58th Inauguration Day with three new cocktails and then sell them for just $10, all day. Now that’s something to cheer about! You have your choice of smoky, spicy Believe Me made with Old Overholt rye, fresh lemon juice, and housemade ginger beer; the #NOT, a riff on sours made with vodka, Triple Sec, fresh lime, cranberry, and egg white; and Who’s Going to Pay for It, which includes tequila blanco, fresh lime, San Pellegrino pompelmo, and salt.

Tredici Enoteca at The St. Gregory Hotel

Here’s what we have to say about Tredici Enoteca: If you don’t go, you are insane because the food is terrific and fun to eat. It’s only been open a short time, and now’s your chance to try it out before it gets too popular and it’s impossible to get a seat. We all know breakfast is the most important part of the day, and if you are planning to join the Women’s March on Washington on Saturday, Jan. 21, then make a reservation and head on over. Breakfast is served from 6:30 to 10 a.m. so you will have plenty of time to enjoy a hearty meal before heading over to Capitol Hill for the rally, which starts at 10 a.m.

Executive chef Carlos Aparicio has created an outstanding menu that includes an omelette with wild mushrooms, spinach, and goat cheese; eggs Benedict with a choice of Canadian bacon or smoked salmon; oatmeal with Vermont maple syrup and apples; fluffy ricotta pancakes with Nutella and mixed berries; whole wheat Belgian waffles with sliced bananas and whipped cream; and loads of fresh, hot coffee. Breakfast dishes range in price from $5 to $18. To keep you warm as you become a part of history, there are complimentary air-activated hand warmers (while supplies last) to fight the cold.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Washington Highly Militarized Ahead of Biden’s Inauguration

Fences with coiled barbed wire, security checkpoints, barricades, and heavily armed guards are what you would expect in a military encampment for a warzone, not in downtown Washington. But these are only some of the measures that have been put in place in preparation for President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration next week.

Federal authorities have said they’re tracking an “extensive” amount of “concerning online chatter” about potential threats to the inauguration, including armed protests, potential threats linked to the Capitol breach, and other types of potential threats.

The fortification of the city, particularly around the White House and U.S. Capitol, began over the past few days and is expected to ramp up nearing Jan. 20.

Videos by reporters, workers, and residents in the area show street closures, workers putting up miles of barricades and fencing, shops and offices being boarded up, and an increased military presence. Military vehicles can be seen parked on downtown streets, and armed guards are checking identification for people leaving and entering the city.

The locked-down city has been separated into “Green” and “Red” zones as part of the 2021 Presidential Inaugural Subcommittees’ transportation plan. The U.S. Secret Service has posted a list of all the street closures on its website, many of which began at 6 a.m. on Jan. 16, and are scheduled to end at 6 a.m. on Jan. 21. A number of bridges and interstate highways into Washington are also scheduled to close at 6 a.m. on Jan. 19.

Concertina razor wire tops the 8-foot ‘non-scalable’ fence that surrounds the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 14, 2020. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Fences block off the White House South Lawn on Jan. 16, 2021. (Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images)

As many as 25,000 National Guard members from all 50 states, three territories, and the District of Columbia will be stationed in the city next week, the U.S. Army confirmed, which is an increase of 5,000 from numbers earlier this week. The number of guardsmen sent to Washington exceeds the number of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, which has been reduced to 2,500, the Pentagon said on Jan. 15.

National Guardsmen were given the authorization to be armed on Jan. 12 in order to support law enforcement in the Capitol and the city, according to a statement by the D.C. National Guard. The authorization came after a request by federal authorities. Troops have been on 24-hour watch in the U.S. Capitol, and off-duty troops have been photographed sleeping in building hallways.

The increased number of National Guard members will be there to supplement the already ramped-up forces from the FBI, U.S. Secret Service, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Capitol Police, and D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department.

Members of the National Guard stand guard behind fences erected around the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Virginia National Guard soldiers march across the east from of the U.S. Capitol on their way to their guard posts in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Samuel Corum/Getty Images)

Before resigning from office, former Acting Department of Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf said in a statement on Jan. 11 that he had instructed the U.S. Secret service to begin National Special Security Event operations for the inauguration from Jan. 13.

The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has also increased its security measures ahead of the inauguration. TSA Administrator David Pekoske said in a statement that the agency is currently processing hundreds of names with law enforcement agencies as part of a risk assessment. The agency will also add additional layers of security at all three D.C.-area airports.

“Those security layers include more law enforcement and explosives detection canine teams, random gate screening, increased number of Federal Air Marshals on certain flights, and additional Visible Intermodal Prevention and Response teams to provide greater security presence at certain rail transportation hubs,” Pekoske said.

A person crosses the street at a road block guarded by Pennsylvania 112th Infantry Regiment National Guard in Washington on Jan. 16, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images) Members of the Pennsylvania National Guard stand guard in Washington on Jan. 15, 2021. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser and security officials have also urged Americans to stay home to watch the inauguration virtually.

“We know this is the right request for our public safety and our public health,” she said on Jan. 15.

D.C. officials estimate the inauguration will cost roughly $45 million due to the increased security measures. So far, Congress has approved $34.9 million, Christopher Rodriguez, director of D.C.’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management Agency, said in a press conference on Jan. 15.

Rodriguez said the amount was keeping in mind deficits that the district had run “because of the heightened number of first amendment demonstrations” seen throughout 2020.

In 2017, security for President Donald Trump’s inauguration cost around $27 million, according to Rodriguez—around $7 million more than the $19.995 million approved by Congress.


Watch the video: So Gaudy opening up for LIL DURK in Washington DC (December 2021).