Traditional recipes

Best of New Orleans #16

Best of New Orleans #16

Chef Emeril Lagasse's flagship restaurant is still pushing boundaries and serving stunningly delicious New Orleans fare

Credit: Jane Bruce

The bold fare at Emeril's proves the celebrity chef isn't content resting on his laurels.

Every day during the month of August, we’re highlighting one restaurant from our recent ranking of the 31 Best Restaurants in New Orleans. Today’s restaurant, Emeril's, is #16 on our list.

At this point, Emeril Lagasse can be resting on his laurels, content in his standing as the country’s most well-known New Orleans chef with a roster of 13 restaurants from Orlando to Las Vegas, but at his flagship New Orleans restaurant, the one that started it all, he’s still pushing boundaries and serving stunningly delicious New Orleans fare thanks to David Slater, his chef de cuisine since 2008. Lagasse’s famous barbecue shrimp is still quite possibly the city’s best, and one bite of dishes like the whole truffle-fried chicken for two, Andouille-crusted drum, and grilled pork chop with caramelized sweet potatoes, tamarind glaze, and green chile mole will tell you everything you need to know about why Lagasse is as renowned as he is.

Here's our complete ranking:
#31. Maurepas Fine Foods
#30. Boucherie
#29. Mother’s
#28. Luke
#27. The Joint
#26. Dickie Brennan's Steakhouse
#25. Mahony’s
#24. MiLa
#23. La Petite Grocery
#22. Gautreau’s
#21. Coquette
#20. Parkway Bakery
#19. Clancy’s
#18. Dooky Chase
#17. Drago’s
#16. Emeril’s
#15. Redfish Grill
#14. Jacques-Imo’s
#13. Bayona
#12. Camellia Grill
#11. Domilese’s
#10. Willie Mae’s Scotch House
#9. SoBou
#8. Root
#7. Herbsaint
#6. Domenica
#5. Cochon
#4. Peche
#3. August
#2. Galatoire’s
#1. Commander’s Palace


Boudin Recipe

I did a bit of a Louisiana Charcuterie tour on my last trip to Louisiana with Boudin, Andouille and Hogshead Cheese being the primary focus. When I’m home in the Detroit area and dreaming of Louisiana, Boudin is one of the things I miss most. So I have to make my own.

For my latest batch of Boudin, I used the very minimally processed Cajun Grain Brown Jasmine Rice that I spoke about in an earlier article. I love the texture and real rice flavor that it adds to the finished product!

I like just enough liver flavor in my Boudin, without it being over powering, be sure to only use fresh pork liver, and lots of green onions and parsley!

Boudin Recipe

2 1/2 lbs Pork Butt
1/2 lb Fresh Pork liver (not frozen), rinsed
1 Medium Onion, chopped
3 Garlic Cloves, chopped
2 Bay Leaves
1 Bundle of Fresh Thyme, tied
Water to cover by 2 inches
Kosher Salt and Black Pepper
1 tsp Cayenne, or to taste
6 Cups cooked Cajun Grain Brown Jasmine Rice
1 Cup Green Onions, thinly sliced
1 Cup Italian Parsley, finely chopped
Hog Casings (if using)

Cut the pork and liver into 2 inch pieces and place in a Dutch Oven, along with the onion, garlic, thyme, and bay leaves.

Cover with cold water by 2 inches. Season the water well with salt and black pepper. Bring to a boil then lower the heat to a simmer, skim off any scum that rises to the surface. Simmer for about 1 hour or until the meat is very tender. Remove the bay leaves, and thyme, then strain the solids from the broth, reserve some of the broth.
Run the cooked meat and vegetables (while they’re still hot) through a meat grinder or food mill, or you could chop this by hand.

Combine the cooked rice with the ground meat mixture, green onions, and parsley. Mix thoroughly and season to taste with Kosher salt, black pepper, and Cayenne. Add some of the reserved cooking liquid to make sure that the finished product is very moist, bearing in mind that the rice will absorb much of the liquid as it sits.

Spread the mixture on a sheet pan and place in the refrigerator to cool.

When the mixture is cool, stuff into prepared hog casings, or form into patties or balls for pan frying. Boudin also makes a great stuffing. Here is a pick of my Boudin Stuffed Barbecue Pork Chops!

To heat the stuffed Boudin links either poach them in water between 165-185 degrees F or brush the casings with a little oil and bake in a 400 degree oven until heated through and the skins are crispy. Boudin is also phenomenal smoked!


Meat Mama Leighann Smith is one badass butcher. Thankfully her fans can look forward to Piece of Meat reopening Oct. 29 — just know she’s not playing about the mask, and she has knives. The deli is open Thursday through Monday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., the kitchen 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. There’s outside seating for ravaging sandwiches like the swoon-worthy smoked brisket with pickled red onions and horseradish mayo the smoked tri-tip cheesesteak the hot pastrami. and on.

Smoked brisket sandwich at Piece of Meat Piece of Meat/Facebook


The 16 best new cookbooks to get you through fall

Each fall, as the corn and tomatoes give way to apples and squash, a crop of new cookbooks arrives. This year they are right on schedule, and needed like never before. As we move back inside after a summer of hikes, bike rides, beach days, and socially distanced backyard gatherings, the kitchen once again becomes a primary theater of entertainment for those who like to cook — or are now forced to more often because of coronavirus. By some stroke of luck, these new cookbooks, long in the works, feel geared toward this time and mood.

Which is to say, they are an antidote. Some are cozy, comforting. Some evocatively conjure a place we may not be able to access, be it a restaurant or a region. Some are filled with illuminating, engrossing writing. And all are total delights to cook from, stocked with recipes for so many things you will want to make and eat.

Here are the new cookbooks that will see you through fall and winter, into an unknown future. Hunker down.

“100 Cookies: The Baking Book for Every Kitchen,” by Sarah Kieffer

This is a bit of a cheat for a fall cookbook list, as it came out at the end of August. But, I mean, 100 cookies! I make no apologies. Sarah Kieffer is the one who broke the Internet with her pan-banging cookies, large, chocolate-rich, and rippled like sandbars. And this book offers plenty of bangers, with a whole chapter of crinkly treats for those who like to make some noise on the way to dessert. You’ll also find everything from rocky road brownies to raspberry rye cookies to espresso cheesecake bars to gorgeously multihued Neapolitan pink-brown-and-tan rounds. Baking them all could be your winter challenge.

“The Barbuto Cookbook: California-Italian Cooking From the Beloved West Village Restaurant,” by Jonathan Waxman

This feels like such a New Yorky inclusion, but if you ever went to Barbuto, you’ll understand. Which is to say, it doesn’t matter if you never went to Barbuto. No one can resist a feel-good neighborhood place with robustly delicious food, and everyone misses that right now. This cookbook helps you re-create the experience at home. The restaurant’s famed roast chicken (350,000 served for a reason) and kale salad are here, along with other craveable dishes: pizzas and a host of other salads, carbonara and the gnocchi that are a Waxman signature, cod baked in parchment and lamb chops with mint butter, super-chocolate-y budino. Welcome to your favorite new neighborhood restaurant, conveniently located in your own home.

“Cook With Me: 150 Recipes for the Home Cook,” by Alex Guarnaschelli

This book is dedicated to the celebrity chef’s father, who passed away. It’s fueled by grief and love and longing. That comes across in the writing. The recipes themselves are joyous and full-flavored and all over the place. Spicy crab dip and pigs in a blanket. Meatless yet somehow meaty dishes like spiced ruby red cabbage “steaks” and beet and brown rice burgers. Pork chops and pad thai and poached salmon. Sheet pan dinners and red sauce fare and brownies made in a slow cooker. It’s a jubilant jumble, and I am absolutely certain Guarnaschelli’s father would have loved it.

“The Flavor Equation: The Science of Great Cooking Explained + More Than 100 Essential Recipes,” by Nik Sharma

Maybe you’re the kind of person who delights in beautifully rendered Venn diagrams charting the overlap of ingredients among cultures, tables of common food pigments and charts about spinach oxidation, discussions of mouth feel, emulsions, and the chemical structure of aromas. Maybe you’d simply like to make a gorgeous chickpea salad with date and tamarind dressing, crab tikka masala dip, coffee-spiced steak with burnt kachumber salad, or chocolate miso bread pudding, backed by research. Whether you’re a science geek, flavor lover, or both, this book by molecular biologist and cookbook author Nik Sharma is for you.

“Greenfeast: Autumn, Winter,” by Nigel Slater

This one is all mood. It feels like puttering alone in a quiet late-afternoon kitchen, when the light is stark and clear, fixing yourself a plate of something warm to ward off the chill creeping in around the old window frames. Slater serves up compositions as much as dishes: Brussels sprouts with brown rice, miso, and Japanese pickles roast cauliflower in a milky onion sauce spiced lentils layered with sweet potatoes and baked until bubbling a bright little salad of beets, blood oranges, radishes, watercress, and mint. The meatlessness of it all feels almost incidental this food is about the season, and ingredients, and caretaking oneself and others.

“In Bibi’s Kitchen: The Recipes and Stories of Grandmothers From the Eight African Countries That Touch the Indian Ocean,” by Hawa Hassan with Julia Turshen

This book champions the often unchampioned in the world of cookbooks: older women home cooking as a primary conveyor of culture African cuisine, both diverse and connected. Hawa Hassan introduces us to grandmothers from Eritrea, Tanzania, South Africa, Madagascar, and more, giving the women the chance to tell their stories and share their recipes. We get chicken biryani from Kenyan grandmother Ma Kauthar, plantains with coconuts and prawns from Ma Josefina of Mozambique, and the Somali flatbread sabaayad from Ma Halima, alongside recipes the authors developed themselves: kunde, a Kenyan dish of black-eyed peas and tomatoes in peanut sauce South African denningvleis, a sweet-and-sour braised lamb and from Somalia a cilantro and chile sauce like the one Hassan sells through Basbaas, her line of condiments.

“Dessert Person: Recipes and Guidance for Baking With Confidence,” by Claire Saffitz

Claire Saffitz, who won a cultish following as host of Bon Appetit’s “Gourmet Makes,” has written her first cookbook. It’s complicated: Bon Appetit video is reckoning with systemic racism and revelations of unequal pay for BIPOC staff, and Saffitz has spoken out about that. (“In Bibi’s Kitchen” author Hawa Hassan, who made several videos with Bon Appetit, has taken a strong stance against the company.) “I have invested and reinvested in relationships and spent a lot of time thinking about how I want the future to look professionally and personally,” she recently posted. “Dessert Person” is a step into that future. The fans who routinely say they would die for Claire from the Bon Appetit Test Kitchen will thrill to recipes for apple and Concord grape crumble pie, preserved lemon meringue cake, babkallah (a babka/challah hybrid), and so much more.

“East: 120 Vegan and Vegetarian Recipes From Bangalore to Beijing,” by Meera Sodha

Meera Sodha, vegan columnist for the Guardian, offers this book of personal recipes inspired by restaurants, home cooks, and cuisines from all over Asia. Japanese onigiri are stuffed with London chef Shuko Oda’s walnut miso. There’s a beet and ginger soup from Sodha’s mum. A Burmese mango salad is a riff on a version she had at a restaurant in Mumbai. There are rice dishes, curries, and noodles. And most of all, there are vegetables, beautifully deployed. When Sodha started writing her column, she wanted to help make plant-based diets more tempting, more pleasurable. “East” is testament to her success.

“The Good Book of Southern Baking: A Revival of Biscuits, Cakes, and Cornbread,” by Kelly Fields with Kate Heddings

Truth in naming. Chef Kelly Fields, who runs Willa Jean in New Orleans, promises to bury us in cornbread and biscuits in her introduction. She follows through, with recipes for Willa Jean’s cornbread (plus variations for cornbread pancakes, waffles, fritters, and croutons) and a half-dozen kinds of biscuits. But there’s so much more to this good book: praline monkey bread, moon pies, New Orleans-style bread pudding, coconut cake, her mom’s recipe for cobbler made with peaches, blackberries, and bourbon. There’s even a recipe for dog biscuits, to make for your best friend.

“Modern Comfort Food,” by Ina Garten

If there’s a new cookbook out by Ina Garten, it’s going to be on this list. Her recipes are reliable, and a little certainty is something we could use in the world right now. Modern comfort food also sounds just right. And I’m not going to fight Ina for making her first chapter about cocktails and things to eat with them. (In April, she won hearts and minds by posting a video of herself mixing and sipping the world’s largest cosmopolitan.) Baked fish chowder, tuna melts, crispy chicken with lemon orzo, cheesy enchiladas, buckwheat crepes, and baked apples will also help get you through.

“Ottolenghi Flavor,” by Yotam Ottolenghi and Ixta Belfrage with Tara Wigley

It seems like there’s a new Ottolenghi cookbook every season, and each time I think, well, this will be the one that finally feels like a retread. But not yet. “Flavor” is the third book in the “Plenty” series, so those who were fans of the first two vegetable-focused volumes will want this one, focused on coaxing maximum taste from produce. Recipes such as hasselback beets with lime leaf butter butternut, orange, and sage galette and the ultimate meatless ragu show you what to do.

“Red Sands: Reportage and Recipes Through Central Asia From Hinterland to Heartland,” by Caroline Eden

Caroline Eden’s “Red Sands” follows in the footsteps of her previous volume “Black Sea.” The earlier book was a journey through Odessa, Istanbul, and Trabzon, while this new one starts in Kazakhstan by the Caspian Sea and ends in Tajikistan in the Fergana Valley. Both are pleasures to read, triangulating journalism, literary writing, and cookbookery: The recipes are part of the reporting, and Eden describes them as “edible snapshots.” Lamb plov with chestnuts, apricots, and watercress takes us to a restaurant called Barashka meatball, lavash, and chickpea soup comes from the Hotel Cosmonaut, where returning space explorers used to stay and dimlama, an Uzbek harvest stew made with quince, is an ideal fall dish.

“The Rise: Black Cooks and the Soul of American Food,” by Marcus Samuelsson with Osayi Endolyn

This book is here to shine a light, celebrating Black food as American food, along with the cooks who shape it. It is here to bring equity, restoring Black history and contribution to the story of food in this country, to tell it truer. And it is here to put delicious, wide-ranging recipes in our hands. You’ll find illuminating profiles of figures such as David Zilber, who was director of fermentation at Noma in Copenhagen New Orleans chef Nina Compton and Devita Davison, director of the nonprofit FoodLab Detroit and you’ll find mouthwatering instructions for tomato and peach salad with okra, radishes, and benne seed dressing spiced catfish with pumpkin leche de tigre saffron tapioca pudding with amaro-marinated strawberries and much more.

“Sheet Pan Chicken: 50 Simple and Satisfying Ways to Cook Dinner,” by Cathy Erway

Cathy Erway delivers with this cookbook concept. In theory, we want to make so many interesting, complicated things. In reality, much of the time, we just want to put chicken on a pan, stick it in a hot oven, and wind up with dinner. This book lets us do that, a lot. Whether it’s spatchcocked chicken with lemon and root vegetables, Chinese lion’s head meatballs, or Puerto Rican-Vietnamese adobo chicken with pineapple is up to us. There are accompaniments, too, like garlicky smashed cucumbers and a citrus salad with olives, chiles, and mint.

“Time to Eat: Delicious Meals for Busy Lives,” by Nadiya Hussain

You may know Nadiya Hussain from her win on “The Great British Bake Off,” or from her cooking show, “Nadiya’s Time to Eat,” which hit Netflix during quarantine. This cookbook is a lot like that show: helpful and considerate, filled with strategies for saving time in the kitchen so one might enjoy it elsewhere. It will get you cooking in batches, stocking your freezer, and wasting less, all while eating breakfast trifles, spicy scrap soup, salmon poke bowls, and lamb with rhubarb-rosemary glaze.

“Xi’an Famous Foods: The Cuisine of Western China, From New York’s Favorite Noodle Shop,” by Jason Wang with Jessica K. Chou

Another cookbook from a beloved New York restaurant. It’s an immigrant story, tracing the journey of Jason Wang’s family from Xi’an, China, to Flushing foodie fame. Along the way, it teaches readers to prepare proper rice, embrace chile oil, and make everything from hand-ripped biang-biang noodles to pork and chive dumplings to spicy cumin lamb skewers.


Tailgate at Home with These Meaty Muffulettas

The culinary archetypes of fall in America include infusing just about everything with pumpkin spice, baking apples into pies and tarts, and spending Sunday afternoons in parking lots before the big game, chowing down on burgers and dogs and beers. And while the first two culinary tropes will be readily repeated during this pandemic, tailgating is inevitably going to look a little different from years past.

Sure, you may not be congregating with large groups of friends, but you can craft your own bespoke tailgating event, complete with all the necessities: plumes of smoke emerging from makeshift grills, chilled cans of beer, and a minimal number of socially-distanced friends, all in the comfort of your backyard. At least that’s what “Top Chef Masters” contestant and James Beard Award-winning chef John Currence hopes you’ll do with his new book, “ Tailgreat: How to Crush It at Tailgating .”

Tailgreat: How to Crush It at Tailgating, $21.03 on Amazon

John himself is a tailgate enthusiast, having catered events at The Grove at Ole Miss for years, so it should come as no surprise that he’s penned a book replete with 120 tailgate-friendly recipes, with plenty of options for sandwiches, cocktails, snacks, and dessert. John was inspired by cuisines from around the world, so along with American staples like sweet mustard pulled pork, roast beef po’boy bites, and snickerdoodle whoopie pies, your tailgate can also be flush with Korean-style BBQ wings and grilled corn guacamole.

Mixing Bowls with Airtight Lids, $31.99 on Amazon

Ahead you’ll find John’s recipe for muffulettas, a classic sandwich found in his hometown of New Orleans. One big difference in John’s riff is that he prefers this sandwich hot—rather than at room temperature, the way it’s often served—baked in the oven on seeded Italian bread. Just as important is the olive salad, complete with two kinds of olives, plenty of pickled vegetables (think red onions, carrots, celery, and peppers), and a handful of spices, like celery seeds and dried oregano.

Once you’ve got all the ingredients ready to go, swipe the bread with the tapenade, mozzarella cheese, mortadella, salami, provolone, and prosciutto, then tuck the sandwich in the fridge overnight. When you’re ready to serve, separate the sandwich halves at the provolone and salami layers and bake in the oven until the cheese starts to brown and bubble. Assemble back together and slice into quarters—all the better for tailgating consumption.

Reprinted from TAILGREAT: How to Crush it at Tailgating. Copyright © 2020 by John Currence. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

Muffulettas Recipe

In the pantheon of tasty delights New Orleans is known for, the muffuletta gets little recognition, considering how amazing it is. The love child of Italian immigrant grocery store staples and New Orleans excess, the muffuletta is a tailgater’s dream come true.

My favorite one comes from one of the quintessential joints, R&O’s, in Bucktown. They serve their muffuletta hot and toasty, unlike the traditional version, which mimics an old-school Italian sandwich and is served at room temperature. When heated, the extra-virgin becomes fragrant, the cheese melts, and the meats crisp around the edges. The bread turns soft, the aroma of the vinegar comes alive, and best of all, the garlic in all the meat and giardiniera wakes up and explodes. For the life of me, I can’t understand why you would eat one at room temperature, unless there was a power outage.


The 5 Best New Restaurants in New Orleans

Every year I am shocked—shocked!—to find that restaurants have the nerve to continue to open even after I complete my list of Best New Restaurants. The affront was compounded this year by the fact that three noteworthy new places opened in my own backyard in the few weeks after the list was finalized. Here are peeks at them, along with two other newcomers from the past year that you should know about whether you're headed this way for Jazz Fest, which starts April 27th, or any other time of the year.

Larry Morrow is a man not shy about his own name: His local events promotion company is called Larry Morrow Events his book, All Bets On Me: The Risks and Rewards Of Becoming an Entrepreneur is published by Larry Morrow Publishing and the neon script letters hanging above the bar at the stylish new restaurant that he recently opened in the Marigny read "The Morrow of the Story…." But the kitchen belongs to Morrow’s mother, Lenora Chong, and she turns out a fine selection of New Orleans soul food: head-on barbecue shrimp fried oysters, catfish, shrimp and soft-shell crab piled into a tower called the "Just Watch" a rich and ruddy crawfish etouffee—along with a handful of Korean dishes. Kick things off with a sizzling plate of chargrilled oysters that taste of smoke, butter, and brine.

This tiny-as-a-coin-pocket bar in the French Quarter was opened by two NOLA cocktail heavyweights—Nick Dietrich, who was previously a partner in the excellent Cane & Table, and Chris Hannah, who usually defends his title as the city's best bartender at Arnaud's French 75 Bar. The two began traveling together to Cuba in 2015, under the guidance of legendary cantinero Julio Cabrera. Manolito is their loving tribute, featuring a bar menu of authentic Cuban daiquiris and other cocktails, with snacks like ropa vieja, a Spanish tortilla, and Cuban sandwiches to match.

Crab Fat Rice with Green Apple and Nasturtium

Rabbit Curry with Jasmine Rice, Pecan, and Cilantro

Nina Compton came to New Orleans as a contestant on Top Chef and stayed to open 2015's Compère Lapin with her husband, Larry Miller. The restaurant quickly became a local mainstay, in the process expanding the definition of "Creole" to emphasize Compton's Caribbean roots. (She is from St. Lucia.) At Compton's second restaurant, she and her longtime sous chef, now partner, Levi Raines, continue to push the envelope. One quirk of Compère Lapin was that, despite its name, "Brother Rabbit," there was no actual rabbit on the menu. That's rectified here with a rabbit leg served in a bright curry that tastes of ginger and clove, topped with pecans and cilantro. Raines steams delicate red snapper and serves it with broccoli rabe sautéed with Calabrian chiles and a Crystal Hot Sauce hollandaise he fries oysters and serves them over rice in a deep brown gravy made from an oyster roux. For dessert, there's sweet/savory pudding made from California sticky rice that's been dressed in vinegar and mirin, cooked in milk punch (Compton's father's recipe) as though it was risotto, and then topped with dulce de leche and puffed rice. It's brain addling but stomach pleasing.

When Bywater American Bistro opened, it took over the space occupied by Mariza, a much-loved Italian restaurant owned by New Orleans restaurant veterans Laurie Casebonne and Ian Schnoebelen. Luckily it was a happy ending for all: a much-better-rested Schnoebelen and Casebonne opened a hole in the fence that separates their house from an alley housing a working voodoo temple, installed a counter, and started selling some of the city's best tacos on weekend days and Tuesday nights. The pulled pork shoulder taco is moist, smoky and irresistible, as is one with battered and fried fish that will have you thinking you're in San Diego, which happens to be where Schnoebelen grew up. There's a small clearing with assorted lawn furniture to sit at farther down the alley, which is decorated with voodoo-themed drawings and paintings. Its name is Rosalie Alley and it's located between two streets named Piety and Desire—which of course is where most of us dwell nearly all the time.


Tailgate at Home with These Meaty Muffulettas

The culinary archetypes of fall in America include infusing just about everything with pumpkin spice, baking apples into pies and tarts, and spending Sunday afternoons in parking lots before the big game, chowing down on burgers and dogs and beers. And while the first two culinary tropes will be readily repeated during this pandemic, tailgating is inevitably going to look a little different from years past.

Sure, you may not be congregating with large groups of friends, but you can craft your own bespoke tailgating event, complete with all the necessities: plumes of smoke emerging from makeshift grills, chilled cans of beer, and a minimal number of socially-distanced friends, all in the comfort of your backyard. At least that’s what “Top Chef Masters” contestant and James Beard Award-winning chef John Currence hopes you’ll do with his new book, “ Tailgreat: How to Crush It at Tailgating .”

Tailgreat: How to Crush It at Tailgating, $21.03 on Amazon

John himself is a tailgate enthusiast, having catered events at The Grove at Ole Miss for years, so it should come as no surprise that he’s penned a book replete with 120 tailgate-friendly recipes, with plenty of options for sandwiches, cocktails, snacks, and dessert. John was inspired by cuisines from around the world, so along with American staples like sweet mustard pulled pork, roast beef po’boy bites, and snickerdoodle whoopie pies, your tailgate can also be flush with Korean-style BBQ wings and grilled corn guacamole.

Mixing Bowls with Airtight Lids, $31.99 on Amazon

Ahead you’ll find John’s recipe for muffulettas, a classic sandwich found in his hometown of New Orleans. One big difference in John’s riff is that he prefers this sandwich hot—rather than at room temperature, the way it’s often served—baked in the oven on seeded Italian bread. Just as important is the olive salad, complete with two kinds of olives, plenty of pickled vegetables (think red onions, carrots, celery, and peppers), and a handful of spices, like celery seeds and dried oregano.

Once you’ve got all the ingredients ready to go, swipe the bread with the tapenade, mozzarella cheese, mortadella, salami, provolone, and prosciutto, then tuck the sandwich in the fridge overnight. When you’re ready to serve, separate the sandwich halves at the provolone and salami layers and bake in the oven until the cheese starts to brown and bubble. Assemble back together and slice into quarters—all the better for tailgating consumption.

Reprinted from TAILGREAT: How to Crush it at Tailgating. Copyright © 2020 by John Currence. Published by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House LLC.

Muffulettas Recipe

In the pantheon of tasty delights New Orleans is known for, the muffuletta gets little recognition, considering how amazing it is. The love child of Italian immigrant grocery store staples and New Orleans excess, the muffuletta is a tailgater’s dream come true.

My favorite one comes from one of the quintessential joints, R&O’s, in Bucktown. They serve their muffuletta hot and toasty, unlike the traditional version, which mimics an old-school Italian sandwich and is served at room temperature. When heated, the extra-virgin becomes fragrant, the cheese melts, and the meats crisp around the edges. The bread turns soft, the aroma of the vinegar comes alive, and best of all, the garlic in all the meat and giardiniera wakes up and explodes. For the life of me, I can’t understand why you would eat one at room temperature, unless there was a power outage.


New Orleans Seafood Gumbo

This is a simple version of New Orleans Seafood Gumbo.

Find the biggest (shrimp) you can for this recipe. In Louisiana, their shrimps are the size of lobsters! Not really - but they're big -)

The gumbo is thickened by the okra cooking down.

It makes a great meal if you serve it with rice and peas - just add some frozen peas to the rice water for the last few minutes - around 8 ozs will do.

I sometimes add frozen sweetcorn and pea mixture and also a smidge of tomato puree and a dash of cayenne or chilli powder to make it a bit spicy - depends on the taste of who is eating - some kids don't like very spicy food.

2 tbspns oil
1 clove garlic, peeled and crushed
1 large onion, peeled and chopped
1 red pepper, seeds removed and diced
1 green pepper, seeds removed and diced
8 oz (250g) okra, sliced
14 oz (400g) canned plum tomatoes, chopped
1/2 tspn allspice
1/2 tspn cayenne pepper
1lb (500g) peeled shrimp - large

Heat the oil in a large pan and fry the onion and garlic until softened.

Add the peppers and okra and cook for 5 minutes.

Add the tomatoes, allspice and cayenne pepper and simmer for about 25 minutes, until the gumbo is thickened.

Add the shrimp - heat through and serve with boiled rice.

A great, quick version of Seafood Gumbo.

For other versions, check out the Seafood Soup button. 50 Fish and Seafood Soup Recipes

There must be thousands of variations for seafood gumbo. Each region has its own recipe and the families who live in the region will have their own little tweaks that they add to make it their own. 

It is basically a seafood stew, normally a tomato base and then it has vegetables added to it. It's a one pot meal which is simple to put together and needs minimal supervision, so it cooks whilst you get on with something else. 

The fish element of the gumbo will not need a lot of cooking as seafood cooks very quickely - a few minutes will be all it needs. 


Services & Gifts

Limousine Services

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Charter Transportation

Need charter transporation or a private tour for your group? Check out the new charter services offered by Gray Line New Orleans -- perfect for private parties, corporate events and special occasions!

Entertainment

With a flair for kabuki make-up and extravagant costumes, Bag of Donuts covers songs in a style they have branded as Superpop: Any song popular from any era. In the great tradition of stunning acts, BOD has to be experienced live to fully feel the impact. Find out for yourself why they were inducted into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

Gifts

Check out Beads by the Dozen for accessories, gifts, or favors for your party or convention. Beads by the Dozen will customize almost any item with a company logo or other artwork provided. If desired, their experienced in-house team can create a unique design just for you.

Since 1996, New Orleans Famous Praline has been selling the traditional Creole candy known as pralines (praw-leens) to New Orleans locals and visitors from around the globe. They use the finest ingredients (pecans, sugar, cream, and more) and a century-old recipe to produce a truly superior praline, handmade and individually sealed for freshness! Enjoy the ultimate "Taste of New Orleans" with our delicious pralines!


Watch the video: New Orleans and New Orleans Music: Best of New Orleans Music Playlist New Orleans Music Jazz (January 2022).