Traditional recipes

Angry Man Sues Guinness Because It’s Sometimes Brewed in Canada, Not Ireland

Angry Man Sues Guinness Because It’s Sometimes Brewed in Canada, Not Ireland

Kieran O’Hara has sued Guinness for $5 million over alleged deceptive marketing; claims beer company is duping customers

Wikimedia Commons

Beck’s is not brewed in Germany… Guinness is not brewed in Ireland. We don’t know what to believe anymore.

When you order a pint of Guinness at a pub, you probably believe that you’re drinking one of the most authentically Irish brews of all time, right?Unfortunately, this may not be the case. In fact, O’Hara has sued Guinness for $5 million for deceptive marketing and alleged misrepresentation of the product.

The class-action lawsuit was filed on December 15 with the court of Massachusetts. Before you grab your torches and pitchforks, the lawsuit admits that most of the Guinness Extra Stout sold in North America is actually brewed at the historic St. James' Gate Brewery in Dublin, with a smaller portion of the product being imported from Canada. The defendant and others in the class seek compensation to make up for paying a premium for what they believed to be authentically Irish beer. Guinness has not yet responded to media requests for comment.

Think winning a lawsuit like this is impossible? In October of this year, Beck’s Beer reached a $20 million legal settlement for misrepresenting the beer’s country of brewed origin. If you believed Beck’s was made in Germany, you can get a $12 refund.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Coffee toffee

I seem to be on a bit of a coffee kick these days — Exhibit A being Alex’s Espresso Chiffon birthday cake with Fudge Frosting and Exhibit B being Thanksgiving’s ridiculous Cappucino Fudge Cheesecake. I’m sure that’s it just coincidence that the coffee kick began just as the number of hours I slept each night decreased, which also coincided with me getting weepy with joy when I wrapped my fingers around my first coffee of the day each morning afternoon. Amazing how you can drink something your whole life but it then all of the sudden one day it becomes a transcendent experience, you know?

Nevertheless my fascination with the intersection of coffee and toffee goes back much longer than that, at least as far as the Espresso Chocolate Shortbread Cookies I made two years ago, and realized that the only thing that could make it more delicious would be to use a chocolate that had toffee bits in it. When Alex brought home Ben and Jerry’s Coffee Heath Bar Crunch this week, I was again reminded of this amazing thing that happens when the buttery, tangy caramelized flavor of toffee contrasts the bitter edginess of espresso, and decided at once to combine the two in one espresso-soaked candy.

Three batches later I can confidently declare that I remain as unskilled in the candy-making department as ever but that if I can pull this off, surely anyone with a candy thermometer can. Er, should you choose to read it, which I failed to do in the first batch, which was burnt — details. But even burnt, I loved the bitter coffee flavor, so unexpected when you’re eating something that is essentially cooked sugar. Batch two was a success that I failed to photograph and by batch three, I am surely an expert so trust me when I say that it is good, very very good. Like first cup of coffee in the morning good, salty buttery caramel good, homemade candy gifted in cellophane bags good… or you know, cotton onesie sleeve good, you know, whatever floats your boat.

Yes, with the molasses again. After discovering how it brings out all coffee’s awesomeness in baked goods, I had to add it to this one too. Of course, if you don’t trust me that it only adds a subtle bitter tinge or are molasses-averse there are alternatives but we really liked it. And also the espresso — if a piece of candy could ever taste like a cup of coffee, this would be it.

1 cup (2 sticks or 8 ounces) butter
1/2 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup white sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons molasses (can swap corn syrup or honey)
1/4 teaspoon salt (or a heaping 1/4 teaspoon flaky sea salt)
1 1/2 teaspoons instant espresso powder
1 cup semisweet chocolate chips, or 6 ounces semisweet chocolate, chopped
1/2 cup chopped hazelnuts (toasted, skinned and cooled) or another nut of your choice

Line a small baking sheet (mine are 9吉, to fit in my puny oven) with parchment paper or a silicon mat and set aside.

In medium heavy saucepan (I used a 3-quart) with a candy thermometer attached, melt butter, brown sugar, white sugar, molasses, salt and espresso together over together. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally with a whisk (one that reaches into the corners is especially helpful here) until the temperature approaches 250¯F, at which point you should stir constantly until it reaches 300¯F.

Pour immediately into the prepared baking sheet — you can spread it more evenly with a offset or silicon spatula but don’t worry if you have neither. Sprinkle the chocolate chips over the toffee and let them sit for a minute until soft, then spread the chocolate evenly over the candy base. Sprinkle the chocolate with chopped hazelnuts and then, if you’re as impatient as we are, you can slide the sheet onto a cooling rack in the freezer until the toffee is set.

Break into pieces and store in an airtight container. If you’re kitchen runs warm, you might prefer to keep it in the fridge so the chocolate doesn’t get soft.


Watch the video: Helmut Schleich - grandios als Grosgoasnpeda an Brauch brauchts auch (December 2021).