Traditional recipes

On Horseback from Mexico to Canada

On Horseback from Mexico to Canada

Think of ‘Unbranded’ as the ultimate road trip envisioned as a buddy movie.

On April 1, 2013, Ben Masters, Thomas Glover, Jonny Fitzsimons, and Ben Thamer – all recent graduates of Texas A&M – set out on a 3,000-mile trip that most of us would view as sheer lunacy. It is a beautiful but perilous undertaking. If they make it all the way, they calculate they will arrive at the Canadian border in early September.

That road trip is the subject of a documentary, ‘Unbranded,’ which opens in theaters this week as well as being available on video on demand.

The quartet’s attempt, through deserts, around cities, and across snowy mountains, will take them five months. True, they have a scatter-shot support team of relatives and acquaintances to show up every so often with a new horse or other assistance. True, they are all trained horsemen. True, they have family wealth behind them, as at least two of them have experience in riding polo ponies.

But still – five months in the saddle over trails that most of us would have had trouble navigating on foot, rethinking their routes around wild fires, searching for back-country roads that apparently exist only on their maps, riding through storms without shelter, and being on constant guard against rattlesnakes, bear and moose.

However, the biggest challenge is often their relations with each other – four men full of testosterone, all more comfortable leading instead of following. It is interesting to see how their personalities emerge and diverge – the leader who has never completely sold to his comrades his holy grail vision of the endeavor, the smartass clown who turns out to be rock-steady, the titular second-in-command who becomes somewhat of a psych job.

The film also examines in a fairly even-handed manner the debate on what to do about the thousands of wild horses – the mustangs whose heritage dates back to Spanish conquistadors – that range across the Western mountain and plains.

All through this, the viewer wonders at times how the camera crew both kept up and stayed out of the way while being in the midst of what at times was a life-or-death venture. Mostly they do their job well, managing to let us see the four as mostly on their own.

Director Phillip Baribeau and editor Scott Chestnut have also done an excellent job of putting together a straightforward narrative with little foreshadowing even after they, of course, know the outcome. And there are a minimum of artsy sunrises and sunsets.

All in all, it is a fabulous documentary of breathtaking beauty and considerable suspense, one that keeps you interested throughout, one that makes you anticipate what will happen next and to ask questions which may have no answers.


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

Premium content: this page is available only to subscribers. Click here to sign in or obtain access.

Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

Premium content: this page is available only to subscribers. Click here to sign in or obtain access.

Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

Premium content: this page is available only to subscribers. Click here to sign in or obtain access.

Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

Premium content: this page is available only to subscribers. Click here to sign in or obtain access.

Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

Premium content: this page is available only to subscribers. Click here to sign in or obtain access.

Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

Premium content: this page is available only to subscribers. Click here to sign in or obtain access.

Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

Premium content: this page is available only to subscribers. Click here to sign in or obtain access.

Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

Premium content: this page is available only to subscribers. Click here to sign in or obtain access.

Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

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Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Mexican horse meat a gourmet product

Horse meat was in the news last week when a study found some stores selling it as beef. But while not popular domestically, the product is actually exported to seven countries around the world where it is considered a delicacy.

More than 2.6 million kilograms of horse meat, graded as high-quality, reached foreign shores last year with Russia, Hong Kong, Egypt, Japan, Vietnam, Kazakhstan and Belgium among the customers.

There are 11 federally-certified slaughterhouses that have permission to kill horses for their meat, according to information from the Agriculture and Livestock Secretariat (Sagarpa).

Located in the states of Aguascalientes, Coahuila, Chihuahua and Zacatecas, the abattoirs slaughtered just over 128,000 horses last year.

Some of the product ended up in in Japan where a raw horse meat dish called basashi is considered a delicacy while in Europe the flesh is consumed in a variety of traditional recipes. In Kazakhstan its consumption is closely linked to the population’s nomadic roots.

At least some horse meat also ends up on dinner plates in Mexico although in most cases its consumption might occur unwittingly.

A study conducted by the National Autonomous University and published last week found that almost 10% of beef samples taken from meat markets in five cities turned out to be horse meat.

Three of the cities where the meat was detected — Aguascalientes, Zacatecas and Chihuahua — are located in states where abattoirs are legally slaughtering the animals.

In the wake of the revelation that horse is being sold off as beef, producers of the latter have called on authorities to tighten controls in order to avoid that consumers are deceived.

“The consumer has the right to know what meat they are buying,” said Enrique López, the head of AMEG, a national beef producers’ association.

“Authorities must do the work to check that another [kind of] meat is not being given to the consumer. The sale of horse meat isn’t prohibited but it’s not regulated for commercialization [aimed at] human consumption in the country . . .” he added.

While many consumers were shocked to find out that they may have been sold and consequently eaten horse meat inadvertently, if properly produced following normal sanitary guidelines it poses no danger to health and in fact is both highly nutritious and low in fat.

Nevertheless, the probability that taco stands will start offering tacos de caballo (horse tacos) openly, at least — alongside tacos al pastor or tacos de bistec remains low.

However, according to a 2015 telephone poll some people may have already eaten them.

A national survey carried out by the consultancy Gabinete de Comunicación Estratégica found that 71.8% of Mexicans who eat tacos in the street believe that there are stands that use not only horse meat in their tacos but dog meat as well.

Premium content: this page is available only to subscribers. Click here to sign in or obtain access.

Among the millions of Mexicans affected economically by the coronavirus are the country’s artisans. Dependent on tourism for their livelihood, they have been forced to look for alternative means of selling their creations. One option is online sales. With that in mind, Mexico News Daily is supporting efforts by the Feria Maestros del Arte, a non-profit organization in Chapala, Jalisco, to help artisans sell their products online by donating 10% of the revenues from annual subscriptions to the Feria.

Another element of the campaign is a series of stories called Artisan Spotlight that will highlight some of Mexico's talented artisans.

We ask for your support for the Artisans Online project by purchasing or renewing a one-year subscription for US $29.99, of which $3 will help artisans reap the benefits of e-commerce. Please click here for more information about Artisans Online.

Tony Richards, Publisher


Watch the video: Horseback Riding in Mexico! (December 2021).