Traditional recipes

New Food Groups: What We're Really Eating

New Food Groups: What We're Really Eating

First there was the pyramid. Then, there was the USDA's overhaul with MyPlate. But despite the attempts to reboot Americans' diets with food groups, a new study shows we're not sticking to them.

What we're really eating, say University of Alabama-Birmingham researchers, doesn't conform to the traditional food groups at all. What they found were five new food groups, and that these dietary patterns emerged based out of race, gender, age, and other demogrpahics. Their list:

Southern Diet: This includes everything at the very bottom of the pyramid, including fried food, processed meats, and sugary beverages. The authors found that African-Americans were more likely to stick to the Southern diet than Caucasians, as well as men, those making less than $35,000 per year, and people without college degrees.

Traditional: The range of foods in this group spreads from Chinese food to Mexican food, pasta, pizza, soup, and other mixed dishes. This also included frozen and takeout meals. The most common consumer in the traditional group? Those in the 45- to 54-year-old age group.

Healthy: At least some people are eating right. This includes the typical veggie, fruit, and whole-grain diet (or what the USDA advises you to eat).

Sweets: The group indicates large amount of sweet snacks and desserts.

Alcohol: Yep, the drink has its own category. With it comes proteins and salads, to balance out the booze. The study found that African-Americans tended not to follow the alcohol group.

It's unclear whether the study will actually have an effect on the USDA's standards for eating, but the authors say it will shed light on Americans' food choices.


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”


All The New Food And Drink You Can Look Forward To In 2021

Plenty of news coverage has been devoted to the ways the pandemic has changed how we eat, as evidenced by the skyrocketing revenues of food delivery apps . But what we eat is also changing.

The food and drink we’ll be consuming in 2021 reflect the reality of our current world (get ready for even more “immune-boosting” food and drink!), but also feature exciting flavors designed to thrill us every time we open the refrigerator or pantry.

We spoke to two seasoned food trend experts to fill you in on everything new and notable coming to your kitchen in 2021. Your shopping list is about to get a lot more exciting.

Immune-enhancing everything

Perhaps not surprisingly, food and drink that offer immunity benefits have seen renewed interest during the pandemic.

“This trend is especially important given the stress and anxiety brought on by 2020,” said Rachel Bukowski, team leader of product development at Whole Foods Market. “It’s a time when health is taking a front seat on our collective priorities, including companies incorporating functional ingredients like vitamin C, mushrooms and adaptogens to foster a calm headspace and support the immune system.”

Indeed, immunity is top of mind for many people right now, according to Melissa Abbott, vice president of culinary insights for The Hartman Group, a consumer research firm that studies American food and beverage culture.

“[Immunity] comes up every winter, but it’s taking a very specific focus [now] because people want to be resilient and not get sick,” Abbott told HuffPost.

Take beverage brands like Sunwink and Heywell , which play up the adaptogenic — or anti-stress — ingredients in their sparkling waters, such as ashwagandha and lemon balm. Vitamin-rich mushrooms have long been valued for their health benefits , which is why products such as Om Mushroom Broth , Pan’s mushroom jerky and Four Sigmatic mushroom-enhanced coffee have also sprung up .

Plant-based food featuring (less processed) plants

Perhaps you’ve seen plant-based foods on supermarket shelves that seem more like they’re processed on factory production lines than made from plants grown on a farm. You’re not alone.

“As much as everything has ‘plant-based’ on the front of [the package], we’re going to start to see more scrutiny of ingredients, processing and sourcing of plant-based things,” Abbott said. “I’m talking about any brand that has actual plants in it that identify as being a plant. Flour, sugar and fats generally don’t qualify.”

For example, Hilary’s veggie burgers have recognizable ingredients such as millet, kale, sweet potato, flaxseed and apple cider vinegar, and Dang keto bars cite almonds as the first ingredient on their nutritional label.

Behold this buffet of breakfast foods

In a Whole Foods Market report on food trends, the grocer shined a spotlight on breakfast. The morning meal is likely to be popular in 2021 and beyond, “as several employers are shifting to allow their team members to permanently work from home, or at least build more flexibility into their schedules,” Bukowski said.

That includes microwaveable Birch Benders Pancake Keto Cups , vegan sausage patties from Meatless Farm and plenty of cereal.

“We’re seeing cereal [sales] rise again, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that we’re home,” Abbott added. “There’s a nostalgia element to boxed cereal, but there’s quite a few cereals that don’t reflect the iconic ones that we grew up with.”