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If You Build It, They Will Come for Brunch: An Interview with Blueberry Builders' Winter D’Angelillo

If You Build It, They Will Come for Brunch: An Interview with Blueberry Builders' Winter D’Angelillo

East One Coffee Roasters is a wonderfully hybrid eatery that opened on a prominent corner of Brooklyn’s Carroll Gardens earlier this spring. The front space, perfect for latte sippers and wine glass clinkers, blends seamlessly with the rear dining room despite the latter being far from traditional and boasting a number of conversation-worthy characteristics.

The woman behind the delightful and dynamic space is Winter D’Angelillo, AIA, a Senior Project Architect at Blueberry Builders, a New York City-based design and build firm dedicated to revolutionizing the construction industry with creative, personalized building solutions. We sat down with her to find out a little about what it’s like to design a restaurant for the first time, work as a woman in a male-dominated field, and see people enjoying the fruits of your labor.

The Daily Meal: What was your favorite aspect of designing your first restaurant? Winter D’Angelillo: The best part was when the final vision started taking shape. Like a play, the third act of construction was the most exciting and revealing; paint finishes started to align with furniture, and lighting, and plates, and glasses—the whole project came to life. The majority of a construction project is behind-the-scenes, so when it finally came together and looked cool, it was like the first signs of spring. It was pretty exciting to create a space that people want to hang out in, one that gives back to the community and to the owner. I feel East One accomplishes this ten times over.

What are the major advantages and disadvantages you encounter when working as a woman in such a male-dominated field?
You know, it’s such a double-edged sword to highlight being a woman in any male-dominated industry. No woman wants to be valued or considered differently than her peers because of her gender. This distinction should disappear, and people are judged solely on what and how they contribute. That said there is, in my experience, a lot of bullshit to deal with being a woman in both construction and in architecture. In construction, anyone young is presumed not to know anything, and women (or girls as we are often referred) can’t possibly know how to build. To build is equated with masculinity and strength. In old-timer professions, like architecture and construction, where experience and reputation are everything (esp. in New York), how could a girl possibly know better than a seasoned plumber where the best place for drainage is? I guess I gave them a run for their money.

What inspired you to showcase the roaster of East One within the space the way you did?
The coffee roaster is special. It looks cool, and you don’t usually see these things around. I wanted it to be celebrated, and put on display, in the center of the room, under the skylight, and right against the windows. It’s intriguing.

What is your favorite feature that you designed for East One's interior?
Tough question – In the front cafe, I dig the bar. I had to fight tooth and nail to get this bar built – it is oversized by typical bar standards to incorporate many times of day; early morning coffee rush, espresso making, pastry sales, and an area for cocktails and stool perching. When we were under construction, there was a lot of anxiety about it being too big, but I held fast to its generosity and it paid off. When you see it from the street, its impressiveness alone brings people in. And when hanging out there for a cup of coffee, you feel that the daily life of the shop and its inevitable operations has an equally important role to the customer areas because it’s such a fixture in the room. Usually the back-of-house is hidden in food establishments, but I think experiencing this is in an open way is much cooler. I also think a big bar gives the baristas a stage, and makes them feel like rockstars.

In the back dining area, I love the open kitchen and open roastery—they are both enclosed by steel and glass, so when you eat dinner you are basically smack in the middle of the these two production areas. It again gives you a feeling of community and inclusiveness in the “goings on” and looks quite industrial, but the lighting is soft and romantic, and the paint colors are gentle; all meant to make a lived-in, comfortable dining experience. It’s a different sensory experience from a typical restaurant, and this inclusiveness was one way to keep the coffee brand present in the back restaurant space where it’s not strictly about coffee.


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'


Rural, Urban and Suburban Homesteading


Image by palmettophoto1 from Pixabay


For over 35 years, Mother Earth News has been teaching readers the basics of homesteading and how to be self-reliant. Whether you dream of creating an urban or suburban homestead, or a rural farmstead, these practical skills, tools and home business ideas will help you move 'forward to the land.'

Americans are the epitome of self-sufficiency and self-reliance. From the country's beginning in the 1600s, American settlers, pioneers, homesteaders, back-to-the-landers and farmers have relied on their ingenuity and creativity to live well on less, engaging their rural communities in the process.

Homesteading may be an old-fashioned word, but the concepts of self-sufficient living building a home (not just a house) and developing a home business are as appealing today as they were in the Homesteading days of the late 1800s. We, as a people, have always been inspired by the Laura Ingalls Wilder family, Daniel Boone, Henry David Thoreau, Joseph Smith, Helen and Scott Nearing, Carla Emery and Eliot Coleman. Through their writings on self-sufficiency and how to do things yourself, they have inspired thousands of people to give the notion of homesteading, rural living or farm life a try. They have shared with us their successes and failures and the joys and sorrows of the adventure. Their reports on building barns and outbuildings, tool usage and starting a home business are the modern homesteading Bibles. We admire and envy their ability to be self-sufficient.

INSPIRING HOMESTEADERS

Excerpted from Mother Made Me Do It by Jim Schley, Mother Earth News October/November 2003

In the late 1960s and early 70s, countless Americans in search of a hands-on, homemade life headed off the beaten track to find land of their own. In some areas these back-to-the-landers attempted to resuscitate rural communities and local economies with new approaches to agriculture and the revival of artisan crafts and old-time skills.

In 1975, Jim Schley moved from Wisconsin to rural New England to attend college. In the long Connecticut River Valley that forms the border between New Hampshire and Vermont, he found a place to sink his own roots: a gorgeous, water-lush land of conifer forests, dramatically distinct seasons, and strong traditions of subsistence farming and logging.

During this time, Jim met scores of people who had built their own houses and who grew most of their own food. Some had dowsed and then dug their own wells. Many had milled lumber for their homes from trees that were hauled out of the forests by horses. And some produced their household electricity with small hydro-turbines, wind spinners or solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Even though many of these folks were former suburbanites, their energetic creativity meshed well with the longtime regional traditions of homesteading: seasonal cycles of work hunting and foraging cutting wood in the winter sugaring in the spring and growing and preserving fruit and vegetables.

Excerpted from The New Pioneers by David Gumpert, Mother Earth News September/October 1971

When Sue and Eliot Coleman sit down to eat in their tiny one-room house, they use tree stumps instead of chairs. When they need drinking water, Sue walks a quarter of a mile through the woods to a freshwater brook and hauls back two big containers hanging from a yoke over her shoulders. And when the Colemans want to read at night, they light kerosene lanterns.

The young couple &mdash Sue is 26, Eliot 31&mdash aren't the forgotten victims of rural poverty or some natural disaster. They live as they do out of choice. They have deliberately given up such luxuries as indoor plumbing, store-bought furniture and everything that electricity makes possible. They have no telephone, no automatic mixer, no TV set.

With their two-year-old daughter, Melissa, Sue and Eliot are trying to escape America's consumer economy and live in the wilderness much as the country's pioneers did. They grow about 80% of their own food and spend only about $2,000 a year on things they can't make themselves.

The Colemans have been living this way two and a half years and they're proud of their accomplishment. 'If you listen to Madison Avenue, we don't exist,' says Eliot. 'They say it's impossible to live on $2,000.'

The Colemans are among a tiny but apparently growing number of young couples, often from middle-class families, who are taking up the pioneering life, or 'homesteading' as it's often called &mdash though today's pioneers usually can't get free land from the government as early homesteaders did. Favorite homesteading areas are New England, the Pacific Northwest, the Ozarks and Canada. Sue and Eliot have 40 acres of thick forest 30 miles south of a small town near the central Maine coast.

The Colemans say they personally know about a dozen couples who are taking up homesteading. A neighbor of the Colemans, Helen Nearing, 67, who with her husband, Scott, now 87, retreated to a homestead in Vermont in the early 1930s and later moved to Maine, says 'a lot of people, more than 100, are getting land and living off of it.'