Traditional recipes

Brussels Sprout, Blue Cheese, and Glazed-Pecan Salad

Brussels Sprout, Blue Cheese, and Glazed-Pecan Salad

Ingredients

  • 2/3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 5 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 4 pounds brussels sprouts, trimmed
  • 6 ounces Maytag blue cheese or Danish blue cheese, crumbeld (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • Glazed Pecans, coarsely chopped

Recipe Preparation

  • Whisk first 3 ingredients in medium bowl to blend. Season vinaigrette to taste with salt and pepper.

  • Cook brussels sprouts in large pot of boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about 8 minutes. Drain. Transfer to bowl of ice water to cool. Drain well; pat dry. Cut brussels sprouts in half lengthwise and place in large bowl. DO AHEAD Vinaigrette and brussels sprouts can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover separately; chill. Bring both to room temperature; rewhisk vinaigrette before continuing.

  • Toss brussels sprouts with enough vinaigrette to coat. Transfer to deep platter; spoon any remaining vinaigrette over. Sprinkle with blue cheese and Glazed Pecans.

Recipe by Michael McLaughlin,Reviews Section

MBQG Recipes

Whisk the first 3 ingredients in a medium bowl to blend.  Season vinaigrette to taste with salt and pepper.

Cook brussels sprouts in large pot of boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about 8 minutes.  Drain.  Transfer to bowl of ice water to cool.  Drain well pat dry.  Cut brussels sprouts in half lengthwise and place in large bowl.  (Vinaigrette and brussels sprouts can be prepared 1 day ahead.  Cover separately chill.  Bring both to room temperature rewhisk vinaigrette before continuing).  

Toss brussels sprouts with enough vinaigrette to coat.  Transfer to deep platter spoon any remaining vinaigrette over.  Sprinkle with blue cheese and Glazed Pecans.

Glazed Pecans (makes 1 1/2 cups)

December bonus:  Great for gifts too!

  • nonstick vegetable oil spray
  • 1 1/2 cups pecans (about 6 ounces)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.  Spray large baking sheet with nonstick spray.  Stir pecans and oil in medium bowl to coat.  Mix sugar, cayenne, and salt in small bowl, then add to pecan mixture and toss to coat.  Scatter coated pecans on prepared baking sheet.  Bake until pecans are brown and crisp, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes.  Transfer baking sheet to rack and cool completely.  Can be made 3 days ahead, store airtight at room temperature.


MBQG Recipes

Whisk the first 3 ingredients in a medium bowl to blend.  Season vinaigrette to taste with salt and pepper.

Cook brussels sprouts in large pot of boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about 8 minutes.  Drain.  Transfer to bowl of ice water to cool.  Drain well pat dry.  Cut brussels sprouts in half lengthwise and place in large bowl.  (Vinaigrette and brussels sprouts can be prepared 1 day ahead.  Cover separately chill.  Bring both to room temperature rewhisk vinaigrette before continuing).  

Toss brussels sprouts with enough vinaigrette to coat.  Transfer to deep platter spoon any remaining vinaigrette over.  Sprinkle with blue cheese and Glazed Pecans.

Glazed Pecans (makes 1 1/2 cups)

December bonus:  Great for gifts too!

  • nonstick vegetable oil spray
  • 1 1/2 cups pecans (about 6 ounces)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.  Spray large baking sheet with nonstick spray.  Stir pecans and oil in medium bowl to coat.  Mix sugar, cayenne, and salt in small bowl, then add to pecan mixture and toss to coat.  Scatter coated pecans on prepared baking sheet.  Bake until pecans are brown and crisp, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes.  Transfer baking sheet to rack and cool completely.  Can be made 3 days ahead, store airtight at room temperature.

December 2002 Bon Appetit Magazine

Comments

  • 2/3 c olive oil
  • 5 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 3/4 teaspoon sugar
  • 4 pounds brussels sprouts, trimmed
  • 6 oz Maytag blue cheese or Danish blue cheese, crumbled (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • Glazed Pecans (see recipe below), coarsely chopped

Whisk the first 3 ingredients in a medium bowl to blend.  Season vinaigrette to taste with salt and pepper.

Cook brussels sprouts in large pot of boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about 8 minutes.  Drain.  Transfer to bowl of ice water to cool.  Drain well pat dry.  Cut brussels sprouts in half lengthwise and place in large bowl.  (Vinaigrette and brussels sprouts can be prepared 1 day ahead.  Cover separately chill.  Bring both to room temperature rewhisk vinaigrette before continuing).  

Toss brussels sprouts with enough vinaigrette to coat.  Transfer to deep platter spoon any remaining vinaigrette over.  Sprinkle with blue cheese and Glazed Pecans.

Glazed Pecans (makes 1 1/2 cups)

December bonus:  Great for gifts too!

  • nonstick vegetable oil spray
  • 1 1/2 cups pecans (about 6 ounces)
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.  Spray large baking sheet with nonstick spray.  Stir pecans and oil in medium bowl to coat.  Mix sugar, cayenne, and salt in small bowl, then add to pecan mixture and toss to coat.  Scatter coated pecans on prepared baking sheet.  Bake until pecans are brown and crisp, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes.  Transfer baking sheet to rack and cool completely.  Can be made 3 days ahead, store airtight at room temperature.


Easy Shortcuts

And there’s no shame in shortcuts and make-ahead steps (you know we love those here at THK!).

Yup … to make this ridiculously easy salad even more ridiculously easy … you can buy pre-crumbled goat cheese in a little tub, to save the couple minutes of crumbling it yourself.

And you can make the dressing a day or two in advance and store it in the fridge. (Hint: it’s so delicious, you might even want to make a double-batch while you’re at it, to use on other salads throughout the week. It’s also especially delicious on our Superfoods Shredded Brussels Sprout Salad.)

Oh – and those awesome candied pecans ? They take about 5 minutes total, and can be made ahead, too!

At “go time” – you just toss it all together! (And use all the time you saved to sign yourself up for Mom of the Year and Hostess with the Mostess!)

Lucky you … you’ll probably even have time to sign up for my “We Love Salad Fan Club”! After one taste of this one, you’ll want to be a lifetime member!


Blue Sprouts Recipes

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Brussels Sprout, Blue Cheese, And Glazed Pecan Sal .

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Goes well with holiday foods or special dinners

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Find and rate low calorie, healthy recipes at SparkRecipes. Plus use our fr .

Find and rate low calorie, healthy recipes at SparkRecipes. Plus use our fr .

Brussels Sprouts With Blue Cheese Sauce

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Mixed Green Salad with Pecans, Goat Cheese, and Honey Mustard Vinaigrette

Ingredients

  • Pecans:
  • 4 ounces whole pecans
  • 1 tablespoon butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • Honey Mustard Vinaigrette:
  • 3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons honey mustard
  • 1 clove garlic, minced (about 1 teaspoon)
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Salad:
  • 1 pound mixed salad greens, including fresh baby spinach
  • 4 ounces goat cheese
  • 1/4 cup sweetened dried cranberries
  • 1 red bell pepper, cored, seeded, and cut into 1-2 inch thin slices

Method

Preheat oven to 300°F. Put the pecans in a bowl, sprinkle the melted butter over them, and toss until they are all well coated with butter. Then sprinkle the pecans with sugar and gently toss again until they are lightly coated.

Line a baking sheet with Silpat or parchment paper and spread the coated pecans out over it in a single layer.

Bake in the 300°F oven for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and let sit until cool enough to touch.

Place the olive oil, balsamic vinegar, honey mustard, minced garlic, and red pepper flakes in a jar, cover and shake until the dressing is well mixed. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Place the salad greens and spinach in a large bowl. Add the goat cheese, dried cranberries, red bell pepper, and pecans. Toss with 1/4 cup of the dressing.


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Brussels Sprout, Blue Cheese, and Glazed-Pecan Salad - Recipes

For the past ten years, Alex and I have celebrated Thanksgiving at our friends’ house in Brooklyn. We’ve built a fire, enjoyed their cooking, and stayed late drinking wine. But! This year, our friends will be out of town, so WE ARE HOSTING 12 PEOPLE…

Here’s our plan:
My aunt is handling the turkey and gravy.
My dad is bringing wine.
We’re in charge of the rest.

In Sam Sifton’s funny (and incredibly opinionated) book Thanksgiving, he shares his rules for the feast. Here are three…

Keep drinks flowing. Start serving drinks the minutes your guests arrive, no matter the hour. Thanksgiving is not a time to judge.

Skip the appetizers. I did not sit in my kitchen on Saturday night making lists, and deal with brining a bird on Monday night, and bake pies on Tuesday night, and spend all of Thursday cooking turkey, sides and gravy, then set a table appropriate to presidents and kings, so that you could come into my house and eat a pound and a half of nuts and guacamole before sitting down for the Thanksgiving feast.

Desserts need not be extravagant. It absolutely should not be experimental or overly cute. It must not involve individual tartlets or parfaits, nor marshmallows in any form. Save the chocolate for nights of depression and anxiety. Instead, focus on the proper execution of the American classics: apple pie, for instance, with a mound of whipped cream, or pumpkin pie with same. These represent Thanksgiving’s highest achievement.

Thoughts? Do you agree with any or all?

Yesterday I tried out Food52’s menu genie. You answer questions about yourself and it gives you a menu to fit your personality and tastes. My menu included a delicious-sounding pumpkin pudding and ricotta toast.

So, here are my questions from the group: Do you have any side dishes you really love? Or overall favorite things? Do you do a kids’ table or cram everyone in? Please share… (My one big tip so far is to invite friends who are not American, so they won’t judge:)

(Image by Norman Rockwell. Sam Sifton quotes via Dinner: A Love Story.)

I love to do fruit for table decor. Maybe combined with a lovely cheeseboard down the center of the table. It looks pretty and encourages guests to stay around the table together longer.

I totally agree about serving something fresh and green – such a nice contrast on a plate filled with rich things! That being said my favourite holiday side dish is a wonderful, cheesy, eggy cauliflower and bacon gratin from Dorie Greenspan’s book, Around My French Table. Most people don’t expect cauliflower on a Thanksgiving table but it’s soooo delicious!

It’s our first Thanksgiving hosting too! We bought our first house about a month ago and we are excited to host, but we are still painting so there is much to do between now and then. I’m going to have a couple of apps b/c I want too, but I agree that it seems silly to eat before you feast.

Favorite sides from childhood: sweet potato casserole & watergate salad

Potential new favorite: Butternut squash, arugula, pomegranate seeds. I made it for the first time this week and I’m hooked. I used Trader Joe’s pre-cut squash, microwaved it, and then mixed it with maple syrup, butter, cinnamon and salt. Delicious.

My menu planning tip (for Thanksgiving especially, but really for any dinner party) is to picture the plate in your mind and bump up all the contrasts as much as you can. What colors are represented? Thanksgiving food tends to be brown and orange, so get some bright greens and red in there, like kale salad, pickled red onions on something, and a raw cranberry relish. What about texture? If everything is soft, add some crunchy and chewy components. And of course, contrasting flavors is important—not everything needs to be sweet! Even naturally sweet dishes like sweet potatoes taste better with a spicy kick, like a drizzle of chimichurri.

Parsnip and pear puree. So lovely and smooth, so easy to make (ahead of time!), and just unusual enough to feel special.

I’m a bit late to this post but

Dry brine your turkey. Seriously. Do it. Just rub it with salt and herbs the night before and pop it back in the fridge in a pan.

And then cook the turkey upside down (breast down)! This makes all the juices drip down and make the breast meat juicy and yummy.

Good luck and just have fun! Everyone else will just be glad they didn’t have to cook.

I would love to share from my household’s Thanksgiving experiences, because I really feel like we’ve nailed down some-sort of a routine and have learned quite a few lessons along the way.

First of all, what we do for Thanksgiving varies greatly year to year. Neither my boyfriend or myself have much family, and what family we do have is spread throughout the country. So, we have been a lone Thanksgiving duet more than once and we love it. Even when we fly solo, we’ll have friends over for cocktails, leftovers (for them) and desserts in the evening since we eat late and everyone else seems to eat early. Other years we have had our official Thanksgiving with family or at friend’s family’s houses, but I still have a few go-to recipes and will bring several dishes.

First: decide what’s worth your time. Nothing, absolutely nothing is worth a nervous breakdown standing in your kitchen on Thanksgiving day. Sit at your table at least a week before and decide what’s worth it to you. For example, my boyfriend’s favorite dish of the year is legit, homemade green bean casserole that I make using Deb’s recipe on Smitten Kitchen. If you haven’t tried it once, please consider it. As Deb points out, it uses more dishes than ideal when your kitchen is teeny tiny like hers or mine, but what you end up with will cause you to swear off the French’s Crispy Onions and Campbell’s Cream of Mushroom Soup version immediately. On the other hand, I refuse to make a cranberry sauce or relish that takes more than 5 minutes. I recently saw a recipe for cranberry apple relish that sounded delicious for 15 seconds until I realized that it simmers for 35-40 minutes. For me, that is Not Worth It. I will continue to throw cranberries into a small lidded sautée pan exactly ten minutes before dinner is plated with an eyeballed-amount of sugar and water and a grating of lemon and possibly nutmeg if I remember.

Deciding what’s Important to you (him: green bean casserole, a meat, turkey, rabbit, or duck, & real plates me: sweet potato casserole, sausage stuffing, cranberry sauce, & a stack of good-looking disposable napkins) and what’s Really Not (salad, a two hour potato dish, lots of choices, rolls that need to be kneaded by hand, place cards, napkin rings, & complicated decorations). I say do a few things but do them well.

For dessert, I typically make pie: traditionally pumpkin, but last year was Smitten Kitchen’s tart cranberry pie. BUT, if I lived in New York City instead of Eastern North Carolina, I would totally order a pie or a cake from a fantastic bakery ahead of time. There are plenty of things other people do better and that’s perfectly okay. Oh and always serve coffee with dessert.

Wishing you the very best results. Remember, it’s an experience. No one is following you with a camera.

P.S. after mulling over cocktail ideas, I decided that I’ll serve champagne with Thanksgiving dinner this year and I’m so excited about it. Now to find an Audrey Hepburn-esque outfit and the perfect toast.

yes to the audrey hepburn outfit! love it :)

We have to have sausage stuffing and homemade cranberry sauce. I was raised eating the canned cranberry sauce, but now love the homemade one, because it gives such nice tartness to the meal. I’m from the South, and we love a really yummy sweet potato casserole too. My parents are organic sweet potato farmers in Oklahoma, so they provide us with them! I think this year we are going to make a sweet potato pie too, with lots of whipped topping.

After my mum died, I started taking charge of christmas dinner (i’m sure if we did thanksgiving that it’d fall to me too!). I quickly learnt the following: turkey takes a really long time to cook, put it on earlier than you think and leave it to rest. people care about potatoes more than anything else so if you have to sacrifice something, don’t make it the potatoes. if you forget something, no one will notice or they’re too polite to say. mostly no one even wants pudding, they only eat it because it’s there. cheat where you can. I’m cooking for 7 adults and 3 kids this weekend and i’m cutting as many corners as i can (pre chopped veg? pre mixed yorkshires? ready made gravy? yes yes yes)

That sounds like a plan wish you luck :)

I worked at a cooking school for years and we did a ton of classes on Thanksgiving. The BEST thing I got out of testing and preparing all of the recipes season after season was Diane Phillips’ make ahead mashed potato recipe. She has a bunch of cookbooks but you can find this recipe online http://blog.nola.com/recipes/2006/11/the_diva_of_doahead.html. The last thing you want to be doing is mashing potatoes when you have guests. Hope this helps. Cheers!

I loved reading all the comments from your readers! I’m excited to be hosting Thanksgiving this year for my own family of five plus my son’s basketball team from Middlebury College! They have a game on the Sunday after Thanksgiving so we will host the whole crew at our place in Cornwall, Moxie Hill Farm. We have a great party barn and a shuffleboard table that I can convert in to a long harvest table. I try to make as much ahead as possible and the pioneer woman’s mashed potatoes are a big hit as well as a sweet potato dish and lots of stuffing. I buy my gravy from a local high end grocery store which is a lifesaver and I usually order a few pies from the bakery. I also am cooking a feast for my two vegan daughters so I usually make most of the sides vegan friendly. Check out my photos of the day on my instagram @mamanaughton. Have a great day and good luck in the kitchen!

GREEN BEAN BUNDLES. Seriously your kids will thank you and so will your taste buds.

Its a simple story really…
Kindergarten. I had a crush on Grant Caudell. Enter the Mother’s Day Class Cookbook. Flipped immediately to the page featuring Granny Caudell’s Green Bean Bundles. Obviously Mom and I had to make them that very night because she is a kick-ass mom. 22 years later, we are still eating green bean bundles for every holiday meal (though we did consciously decide to drop dear old Granny Caudell from the name after her grandson broke my 7 year old heart).

-2 can green beans
-1/2 slab of bacon (literally. cut it in half so they become short strips)
-1/2 pack dry Italian seasoning
Wrap about 3-4 beans in a strip of bacon. Fill up a casserole dish with as many of those suckers as you can and sprinkle with seasoning. Bake for 30-40 minutes with whatever else is obviously already in the oven. EAT. You’re welcome.

Hi! I like your sense of humor Caroline. And have enjoyed reading everyone’s thoughts.

Thanksgiving has always been a favorite holiday for me, particularly because I went into labor with our first born, soon after stuffing myself with a 2nd helping of Pecan Pie, after our annual family dinner at my Aunts house.
Our daughter will turn 40 November 27th! So exciting! ?
We’ve had Thanksgiving at her home in Bethesda Md. since she got married and had kids. She refused to travel on her birthday, 6 hrs. to Ct.

Her husband and mom are in charge and do everything. The kitchen is their domain. They are organized, experienced, methodical, and excellent cooks. They’ve got it down to a science and I’m always in awe.

Everyone will be coming to our home in Ct. this year.
And will not be arriving till Thursday. We have 5 grandkids ages 6 months to 7 years old.
There’s a possibility they will arrive the night before and we will wake up to a houseful which might be chaotic although truly wonderful.

I am beyond nervous about hosting this year. I don’t have anyone that I can count on to help. Everyone works full time and already has their plates full.
I haven’t entertained more than 6 people at a time, for as long as I can remember. I tend to get overwhelmed when my to do list is larger than usual and prefer simplicity and calm.
I feel I can’t even organize my thoughts or wrap my head around all I need to do start doing, in order to “get the party started”!
Let alone order the turkey, shop, prepare, cook, set a lovely table and be dressed and relaxed to welcome 16 guests.
Any thoughts to create a great, stress free and wonderful Thanksgiving?
Feeling overwhelmed.

We live in Brooklyn and get our turkey from Dinosaur BBQ. It saves so much stress and it has an amazing smoked flavor.


The Unofficial Big Green Egg Cookbook: Tasty Recipes and Step by Step Directions to Enjoy Smoking with Ceramic Grill

Publisher: Independently Published

Complete Ceramic Smoker and Grill Cookbook The ultimate cookbook for your Big Green Egg smoker and grill, with this cookbook you could smoke all types of beef, pork, lamb, fish and seafood, ham, poultry, veggies, and game. An essential cookbook for those who want to smoke meat without needing expert help from. Includes clear instructions and step-by-step directions for every recipe. Find these recipes in this authentic cookbook: BEEF ROAST WITH RICH COFFEE RUB SPICY KOREAN PORK BULGOGI ORANGE-MUSTARD GLAZED GRILLED HAM GARLIC AND HERB RACK OF LAMB HONEY-GLAZED PECAN SMOKED HALIBUT RED CHILI SCALLOPS WITH HOMEMADE SALSA APPLE, BOURBON, AND BACON STUFFED TURKEY CHILI-CRUSTED COLA WILD BOAR HAM TRIO OF MUSHROOM SALAD WITH TOMATO PERSILLADE Happy Smoking journey with Big Green Egg!


Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Sharing the Hard

In my mind lives a mental list of cards I want to send and emails I should return. I'd like to read a big stack of books. I'd like to be a better friend. I'd really like to get caught up with Liz Lemon - I miss her. I think about all of these things, all throughout the day, but when it comes to this - a quiet house - I'm just done. Altogether, in every way.

On Saturday I may have had a panic attack. It's possible. True, I have weirdo health issues that have made random chest pain a part of my life, but this time was different. I stood alone in my living room while my heart thumped out of my chest. I felt like Pepe Le Pew when he sees his skunk crush - I could swear the imprint of my heart was pushing out through my ribcage. I thought, This can't be a panic attack. I don't panic. But the longer my heart thumped, the more I remembered that my life has become a fight to survive. And I never thought I would say that. I am on my game every split second of every single day because it's not optional. I worry that everyone else is drowning in the wake. I worry that I've lost my mind.

And somehow, a lot of the time, I do it with a smile. This is the part that scares me.


I'm not smiling because I'm fake or clueless or Pollyanna. I'm smiling because I have found that life is better when it's mostly seen as a gift and I go down with the ship if I stop smiling for too long. I'm smiling because all of this crazy has become all I know.

If there were an Olympics for griping and self-pity, then I'd take the bronze. You might as well just know that. And if you're inclined not to believe me, I'll get you Cory's number. But I like to think that the scales of my life tip in the favor of the smiles. It makes me feel sane to believe that and sane is good, or at least as far as I can recall.

Then I remember how I burst into quasi-inconsolable tears this morning when the toilet clogged while Cory is out of town. I saw no possibility that the world was right or good in light of the clogged toilet. I tried to unclog it. I almost vomited. (*Important side-note: my mortal fear in life is clogged drains of all kinds. Clogged toilets give me nightmares and the shakes.)

Ruby sat by me and rubbed my back while I cried. My instinct was I should be hiding, but even clearer was the voice telling me that I don't ever want Ruby to feel like she has to hide. I want her to know that it's okay to feel all of these things. I sat there and cried and I thought of all of the women whose husbands are deployed right now. They probably save their emotional breakdowns for more important things. I wanted to bake them some banana bread and spritz some perfume on their hair. I thought of all of the moms dealing with the same kid stuff I'm dealing with and I wanted to march into their homes and demand that they go take a nap while I hold down the fort.

My muddied-up heart started to see that this is one reason we feel pain. It makes us human. It connects us. We remember the bruises and we recognize them on the hearts of others. I'll take empathy over sympathy any day.

I don't know when this season of my life will pass, but I do know that it will. In the meantime, I'll scratch and claw for some sanity. I'll daydream about getting out to do something fun, all the while knowing that there's no way in heck I'll have the energy to actually do it. I'll pray that my friends don't give up on me. I'll cut myself some slack, dang it.

If you know anything about me, or if you know enough to imagine certain things about me, or if you recognize yourself in me, then you can imagine what it feels like to blow my own cover. Please, I beg of you, do not nicely suggest that I might be depressed or that I should seek the counsel of a professional. Number one: Maybe I am. I don't think so, but it's probably too early to tell. I'll keep you posted. Number two: If I have to seek the counsel of one more professional right now I might show up naked and raging with troll hair and a wild look in my eyes. It could be the very thing that throws me over the edge.


What you can do is send your prayers my way. Or even better, find someone around you who needs help and go help her. Give her the benefit of the doubt or a manicure. Something. Then tell me about it. I like those kinds of stories.


As for you, if you're feeling beaten-down by a very small person, if your brain requires so much daytime vigilance that it revolts entirely at 8pm, if you are sick to death of calls from doctors reminding you that your kid has a serious, costly illness, if you're still not sure where you'll be living in June, if you're so dang tired that you cannot sleep at night, if you believe that you will never finish your stupid book, if you very quietly cuss at your carpeted kitchen sometimes, if plungers make you cry, if you're feeling misunderstood or judged, if you're tired of guessing and failing and grasping, if your husband brought you flowers yesterday because it really is that dire, if you're feeling left behind and maybe just a smidgen crazy (like really, truly crazy), please know that I am right here with you.

I'll bake you a pretend loaf of banana bread if you'll do the same for me.