Traditional recipes

Millennial Pink Mushrooms Are the Latest (And *Greatest*) Trend We're Eyeing

Millennial Pink Mushrooms Are the Latest (And *Greatest*) Trend We're Eyeing

You can buy seeds and cultures online to grow these beauties right in your backyard.

Like most of the rest of the world, we at Cooking Light are not immune to the charms of food trends—especially if they’re healthy.

From new grains to the best snacks for weight loss, it’s always fun to find something surprising. But, unfortunately, often the trends that rock the food world aren’t necessarily so healthy (we’re lookin’ at you, s’mores doughnuts).

Stay up to date on what healthy means now.

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So when we find something that’s fun, new, and wholesome, we’re pretty excited about it. All of this to say…we were playing on Instagram yesterday (shameless plug, follow us!), when we stumbled across what at first looked like flowers. But were they, dear reader?

No(!).

This beautiful photo was taken by Instagram maven Aliza J Sokolow (in Paris?! How chic.) They're mushrooms. Luscious oyster mushrooms in everyone’s favorite Millennial Pink. We’re calling it: they’ll soon be taking over the internet, and we’re here to not so subtly remind you that we basically just dropped them right into your lap.

You can order them online, grow them yourself, or we’re guessing, find them in restaurants soon enough. Fun fact? They just came into season.

So, if you need us, we’ll be experimenting with these, bringing a little blush to pasta recipes, some pink to our pizza, and beautiful color to grain bowls.


The 6 Home Trends You'll See Everywhere This Year, According to the Experts at Etsy

After a tumultuous year, homeowners are ready to welcome fresh and comforting pieces into their homes and get decorating, especially as we continue to spend more time inside than ever before. It’s easy for your current décor to seem underwhelming in recent—when you are staring at it day after day, it’s bound to happen.

Enter Etsy’s fresh home trend predictions for the year, which embrace what homeowners need most: clean spaces, comfort, and of course, pieces that have emerged after social media deemed them as must-haves. Here are the trends that Etsy predicted will appear everywhere this year.


Blush Pink Home + Fashion Trends

The saying goes that life imitates art imitates life. Well, my saying would be my decor mimics my fashion mimics my decor!

It’s seems that a trend of mine is that what I’m loving in home decor, I also love in fashion. A couple years ago I wrote a post about trending tassels and trending banana leaf prints (both of which I’m still loving for my home and fashion accessories!)

Another trend I am loving for both my home and fashion style is blush pink! I’ve always loved this color in my home decor and design. Lately I’ve started to notice I gravitate towards this soft blush hue in my closet too.

I’m an avid Amazon shopper, and Amazon has really stepped up their home decor AND their fashion options in the last few years. You can get SO many stylish trendy options on Amazon that will be on your doorstep in two days!

With Valentine’s Day just around the corner and Spring just a few short weeks away, I’ve been eyeing the soft blush and peachy pink hues even more lately. Here are some of my favorite home decor + fashion finds from Amazon (all with the 2 day shipping option!)


14 Clean Hair Products For Healthier Summer Locks

Starting your own business can feel isolating without a network of women to bounce off ideas, ask questions, and cheer you on along the way. Enter Selfmade, Brit + Co's 10-week highly-interactive virtual course that brings together top female entrepreneurs to teach you how to build a new business — from business plan to promotion — or grow your existing one.

The best part? Selfmade now provides one-on-one mentoring with successful entrepreneurs who've been where you are right now and who care about making a difference for women in business. They include business owners, founders, VCs, and subject-matter experts in industries such as finance, advertising, marketing, licensing, fashion, and media.

Our summer mentorship program will feature a host of new mentors we're excited to connect you with, including:

Linda Xu, Entrepreneur and E-Commerce Expert

Linda is the co-founder and chief growth officer at Cart.com, a Series-A e-commerce technology platform that partners with brands to help them grow. Linda served as head of growth at Sitari Ventures where she oversaw strategy and operations. She has acquired and advised tech and consumer companies as a private equity investor at global firms including The Riverside Company and Lazard. Additionally, Linda spent a brief stint on the team launching Uber Freight. She loves all things food and plants.

Stephanie Cartin, Social Media Expert + Entrepreneur

An entrepreneur at heart, Stephanie walked away from her corporate career in 2012 to follow her passion to launch Socialfly, a leading social-first digital and influencer marketing agency based in New York City. Socialfly has since blossomed to over 30 full-time employees and has been named to Inc. 5000's fastest growing private companies two years in a row. The agency has worked with over 200 well-known brands including Girl Scouts, WeTV, Conair, Nest Fragrances, 20th Century Fox and Univision. Stephanie is the co-host of the Entreprenista Podcast and co-author of Like, Love, Follow: The Entreprenista's Guide to Using Social Media To Grow Your Business. She is also a recent recipient of the SmartCEO Brava award, which recognizes the top female CEOs in New York and a Stevie Award for Women Run Workplace of the Year.

Kristina Ross, Content Creator + Social Media Whiz

Kristina Makes #Content is a social media ✨funtrepreneur✨, creative strategist, and public speaker for all things Internet related. Four years as a magazine editor and producer/copywriter in the world of advertising (Mercedes, Cancer Research, French Kiss Records), Kristina packed her bags and decided to go remote with social media as she saw a booming industry. Since then, she built @thefabstory from 10k to 1m followers in just 18 months and now specializes in creative strategies behind social media advertising and user acquisition. Her campaigns have levelled apps from the top 50 into #1 in their app store categories overnight. Kristina's work and experiences have been featured in Forbes, Thrive Global and has given several talks at Harvard Business School on the big bad world of #content.

A.V. Perkins, Selfmade Alum and Creator of AVdoeswhat

A.V. is a DIY expert and creator of Avdoeswhat.com. What began as a traditional Do-It-Yourself blog has grown into a lifestyle platform that includes crafts, upcycled furniture and pop culture. As a digital host for HGTV Handmade, along with appearances in Bustle, The Pioneer Woman, and BuzzFeed, A.V. is determined to help thrifty millennials realize "Life is better when you Do-It-Yourself!" A.V. is also the co-creator of University of Dope, an exciting thought-provoking card game that celebrates Hip Hop culture.The first of its kind.

David Mesfin, Creative Director + Brand Expert

David is a multi-disciplinary designer and creative director with award-winning integrated campaign background, including the Super Bowl, FIFA, NFL, and global launch campaign. He has created global partnerships to increase brand awareness through traditional, digital, social, and experimental marketing campaigns, collaborating with C-suite leaders from Genesis, Hyundai, Honda, Sony, Adidas, Oakley, Toyota, Neutrogena, Land more to communicate their company's vision through creative and marketing. He has earned awards from Cannes, One Show, Clio, Webby, EFFIE, Communication Arts, Google Creative Sandbox, OC and LA ADDY, DIGIDAY, TED | Ads Worth Spreading, American Advertising Federation, FWA, The A-List Hollywood Awards, IAB Mixx, and Graphis.

Jasmine Plouffe, Brand Strategist

Jasmin is a brand strategist/graphic designer who helps female entrepreneurs attract their dream customers by sharing their story and taking their branding and graphic design to a whole new level.

Plus, our Selfmade Alum will be there to guide you along the way! Go from feeling alone to feeling deeply connected to a community of like-minded women. Our professional business and career coaches will encourage you to take the next step toward your biz goals via weekly Accountability Pods. Students will have access to a wide community of like-minded entrepreneurs, including experts, founders, future business partners, freelancers, and more.

This summer, Selfmade coaches include Niki Shamdasani, co-founder and CEO of Sani, a South Asian-inspired fashion brand Emily Merrell, founder and chief networking officer of female-focused networking organization Six Degrees Society Dr. Annie Vovan, whose career spans the corporate world, non-profit space, and service-based and e-commerce businesses and Cachet Prescott, a business mindset coach and strategist.

Ready to take your business idea to the next level? Enroll in Selfmade Summer session today!


These Charming Pink Raspberry Slices by Krisztina Berta are, well … incredibly charming. The luxurious raspberry cream filling is made especially vibrant by a dash of beet powder and then it’s sandwiched between two layers of fudgy oat and date crust and topped with a dash of red beet powder and rose petals before serving.

Trying to make a good impression at your next brunch? Try Gabrielle St. Claire‘s Pink Sushi Rice Avocado Stacks! The rice is tossed in a tangy, vinegar and dragonfruit marinade and then layered with fresh cucumber, avocado, and lemon and finished with some sesame seeds. This is a great recipe to make when you need finger food for a party.


We’re living in the age of mushroom coffee, chocolate, jerky, and beer.

At the start of the pandemic, when Smallhold, a Brooklyn-based indoor mushroom grower, saw orders from restaurant partners decline, they began to pivot to mushroom growing kits—timed perfectly for those looking to pick up a new culinary hobby. And they were not alone.

Almost overnight, my Instagram feed was filled with suggestions for mycelium fruiting block kits from smartly marketed companies like North Spore and Nearby Naturals to grow bright pink or yellow oyster mushrooms right in one’s own home. For many, playing fungi gardener gave a sense of growing their own food in cramped apartments at a time when supermarket runs were fraught. For others, the sheer novelty of the colorful, wiggly mushrooms quickly sprouting out of their sawdust bases provided a shot of needed joy.

But the legitimate excitement and fascination around mushrooms during the pandemic extends well beyond just growing them. Today, fashion designers are working with eco-friendly mushroom leather. You can buy nonalcoholic beer brewed with turkey tail or lion’s mane that promises properties that help you minimize stress. There are a dozen chaga mushroom–based coffees that aim to eradicate brain fog without caffeine jitters, and chic chocolate bars peppered with ingredients like reishi that highlight increased energy and immunity as their alleged benefits.

In January, Multiverse Marketplace opened, claiming to be the internet’s first-ever dedicated space for the fungi kingdom, a curated online marketplace for purchasing mushroom products. Soon, they’ll release a mushroom-themed podcast, blog, and even their own in-house product. And they’re not the only mushroom media company launching: Mushroom People, from the team behind the weed-focused Broccoli magazine, will debut as its own publication later this year.

Due to increased interest, billions of dollars are pouring into the functional mushroom space, the non-psychedelic side of the industry (though once legalization is closer to fruition, it goes without saying that there will be plenty of money extended there, too) globally, the functional mushroom market is projected to make $69.3 billion by the end of 2024. It’s an exciting time for those who have benefited from the power of mushrooms and who see the potential in their flavor and medicinal qualities—there are more options on the market than ever before.

It would be easy to call the ’shroom boom just a trend, but many of these products are simply repackaging the way mushrooms have been revered for their medicinal properties for thousands of years.

It would be easy to call the ’shroom boom just a trend, but many of these products are simply repackaging the way mushrooms have been revered for their medicinal properties for thousands of years, particularly in East Asia and by indigenous groups throughout the world—only now with millennial-looking branding. It has been well documented, for example, that mushroom-cacao drinks were consumed by the Aztecs. For thousands of years, mushrooms have been a key component of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). And, in ancient Egypt, mushrooms were revered as symbols of immortality. Western companies are only now catching up and interested.

Andrea Hernández is a professional snack trend forecaster behind the newsletter Snaxshot, which has over 2,000 subscribers—a mix of CPG investors, founders, and snack-curious customers—who look to her for honest opinions about what’s coming in the industry. She even has an anonymous hotline so that subscribers can give their unfiltered feedback on products. Recently, she put together an entire issue about the emerging fungi space. Mushrooms, she says when we chat via phone, may be more attractive than ever for consumers to explore, as they touch on so many different elements exacerbated by COVID-19. On the wellness side, there are tinctures and powders, which can be consumed as is or incorporated into cooking, that claim to help with immunity, stress, and fatigue, among other things. On the snack side, mushrooms offer a way to eat less meat while packing in the glutamates of umami.

When Michael Pan went home to see his family in Malaysia a few years ago, he came across a household recipe for a dried mushroom snack that had no official name many of his family members are vegetarian Buddhists, and they looked to the natural sources of vitamins, fiber, and antioxidants present in shiitakes. It eventually became the basis for a hearty product I can’t stop buying: Pan’s Mushroom Jerky.

The original product is made with dried shiitake mushrooms, water, avocado oil, organic coconut sugar, Himalayan pink salt, and organic chia seeds. The result is a chewy snack that can be eaten by itself or used in noodle dishes, salads, and charcuterie-free charcuterie boards. In a Shark Tank episode that debuted last November, Pan struck a deal with one of the show’s hosts, Mark Cuban. Since the episode’s premiere, the response has been outsized. Pan attributes part of his success to staying true to his origins and honoring the history of mock meat that’s rooted in ancient Chinese cooking.

“We’re at the cross section of a few things happening in the mushroom space, using mushrooms’ unique taste, texture, and health properties and building on that legacy,” he tells me when we chat on the phone. “The question then becomes how we leverage that history to get as many people as possible to enjoy the benefits of mushrooms, which, in our case, are shiitakes.”

Kirsten Kirby-Shoote is an urban farmer and member of I-Collective, an Indigenous food collective, who tells me that, overall, she’s excited about what’s happening with mushrooms, but she’s concerned by it, too. The “exoticism and exploitation of Indigenous medicine” in order to sell certain products is something she’s particularly wary of, especially right now, when Indigenous communities are disproportionately affected by COVID-19—and, likewise, of the potentially disrespectful harvesting practices she sees a lot of major companies employing. “Chaga in particular has very specific cultural traditions,” she says. “I consider land, water, and plants to be relatives once you divorce them from that, you’re more comfortable calling them a resource . . . you’re not going to see an emotional connection.”

“I’m all for casual foraging, but when it comes to purchasing mushroom products, it’s important to vet the company to understand how their mushrooms are grown and, if they’re wild-harvested, to make sure they’re wild-harvested sustainably and responsibly.”

Though mushrooms are a much more sustainable alternative to meat, improperly harvesting them seems to be on the minds of at least a few business owners I spoke with in the mushroom space, especially as many of them have seen sales soar during the pandemic. “I’m all for casual foraging, but when it comes to purchasing mushroom products, it’s important to vet the company to understand how their mushrooms are grown and, if they’re wild-harvested, to make sure they’re wild-harvested sustainably and responsibly,” says nutritionist and chef Rachael Gorjestani, cofounder of a line of products called Goldmine. She has doubts about what happens when major brands forage their ingredients at scale.

Nadine Joseph runs one of the few BIPOC-owned medicinal mushroom brands, Peak and Valley, which she was inspired to launch after pursuing academic work on the neuroscience of stress. She says that sustainability is a key tenet of her model—in terms of both sourcing and ensuring that farmers are paid a living wage.

With Peak and Valley, which sells adaptogenic powders, Joseph hopes to show that “everyone should be able to enjoy the power of mushrooms,” and she’s been exhilarated by seeing her customers use her products in unexpected ways, like sprinkling them on ice cream.

Even with ubiquity on Instagram and their longevity as one of the world’s oldest living organisms, there are still barriers to getting American customers on board the mushroom bandwagon, but attitudes are changing. “When I first started, I was met with a lot of skepticism,” says Pan. “I believed in my concept and kept going, and it’s amazing to see how much the consumer space has changed its attitude toward mushrooms over the past four years I tip my hat to the companies that came before us that help paved the way.”

Many have used the pandemic, whether they intended to or not, as a chance to realign their values. Mushrooms may well provide a blueprint for the food industry. After all, as author Anna Lowenhaupt Tsing writes in her prescient book The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins, “the uncontrolled lives of mushrooms are a gift—and a guide—when the controlled world we thought we had fails.”


The 16 Most Comfortable Sneakers & Sandals For Summer

Starting your own business can feel isolating without a network of women to bounce off ideas, ask questions, and cheer you on along the way. Enter Selfmade, Brit + Co's 10-week highly-interactive virtual course that brings together top female entrepreneurs to teach you how to build a new business — from business plan to promotion — or grow your existing one.

The best part? Selfmade now provides one-on-one mentoring with successful entrepreneurs who've been where you are right now and who care about making a difference for women in business. They include business owners, founders, VCs, and subject-matter experts in industries such as finance, advertising, marketing, licensing, fashion, and media.

Our summer mentorship program will feature a host of new mentors we're excited to connect you with, including:

Linda Xu, Entrepreneur and E-Commerce Expert

Linda is the co-founder and chief growth officer at Cart.com, a Series-A e-commerce technology platform that partners with brands to help them grow. Linda served as head of growth at Sitari Ventures where she oversaw strategy and operations. She has acquired and advised tech and consumer companies as a private equity investor at global firms including The Riverside Company and Lazard. Additionally, Linda spent a brief stint on the team launching Uber Freight. She loves all things food and plants.

Stephanie Cartin, Social Media Expert + Entrepreneur

An entrepreneur at heart, Stephanie walked away from her corporate career in 2012 to follow her passion to launch Socialfly, a leading social-first digital and influencer marketing agency based in New York City. Socialfly has since blossomed to over 30 full-time employees and has been named to Inc. 5000's fastest growing private companies two years in a row. The agency has worked with over 200 well-known brands including Girl Scouts, WeTV, Conair, Nest Fragrances, 20th Century Fox and Univision. Stephanie is the co-host of the Entreprenista Podcast and co-author of Like, Love, Follow: The Entreprenista's Guide to Using Social Media To Grow Your Business. She is also a recent recipient of the SmartCEO Brava award, which recognizes the top female CEOs in New York and a Stevie Award for Women Run Workplace of the Year.

Kristina Ross, Content Creator + Social Media Whiz

Kristina Makes #Content is a social media ✨funtrepreneur✨, creative strategist, and public speaker for all things Internet related. Four years as a magazine editor and producer/copywriter in the world of advertising (Mercedes, Cancer Research, French Kiss Records), Kristina packed her bags and decided to go remote with social media as she saw a booming industry. Since then, she built @thefabstory from 10k to 1m followers in just 18 months and now specializes in creative strategies behind social media advertising and user acquisition. Her campaigns have levelled apps from the top 50 into #1 in their app store categories overnight. Kristina's work and experiences have been featured in Forbes, Thrive Global and has given several talks at Harvard Business School on the big bad world of #content.

A.V. Perkins, Selfmade Alum and Creator of AVdoeswhat

A.V. is a DIY expert and creator of Avdoeswhat.com. What began as a traditional Do-It-Yourself blog has grown into a lifestyle platform that includes crafts, upcycled furniture and pop culture. As a digital host for HGTV Handmade, along with appearances in Bustle, The Pioneer Woman, and BuzzFeed, A.V. is determined to help thrifty millennials realize "Life is better when you Do-It-Yourself!" A.V. is also the co-creator of University of Dope, an exciting thought-provoking card game that celebrates Hip Hop culture.The first of its kind.

David Mesfin, Creative Director + Brand Expert

David is a multi-disciplinary designer and creative director with award-winning integrated campaign background, including the Super Bowl, FIFA, NFL, and global launch campaign. He has created global partnerships to increase brand awareness through traditional, digital, social, and experimental marketing campaigns, collaborating with C-suite leaders from Genesis, Hyundai, Honda, Sony, Adidas, Oakley, Toyota, Neutrogena, Land more to communicate their company's vision through creative and marketing. He has earned awards from Cannes, One Show, Clio, Webby, EFFIE, Communication Arts, Google Creative Sandbox, OC and LA ADDY, DIGIDAY, TED | Ads Worth Spreading, American Advertising Federation, FWA, The A-List Hollywood Awards, IAB Mixx, and Graphis.

Jasmine Plouffe, Brand Strategist

Jasmin is a brand strategist/graphic designer who helps female entrepreneurs attract their dream customers by sharing their story and taking their branding and graphic design to a whole new level.

Plus, our Selfmade Alum will be there to guide you along the way! Go from feeling alone to feeling deeply connected to a community of like-minded women. Our professional business and career coaches will encourage you to take the next step toward your biz goals via weekly Accountability Pods. Students will have access to a wide community of like-minded entrepreneurs, including experts, founders, future business partners, freelancers, and more.

This summer, Selfmade coaches include Niki Shamdasani, co-founder and CEO of Sani, a South Asian-inspired fashion brand Emily Merrell, founder and chief networking officer of female-focused networking organization Six Degrees Society Dr. Annie Vovan, whose career spans the corporate world, non-profit space, and service-based and e-commerce businesses and Cachet Prescott, a business mindset coach and strategist.

Ready to take your business idea to the next level? Enroll in Selfmade Summer session today!


The 17 Best Vegetarian Cookbooks To Add To Your Collection

Veggie enthusiasts and staunch carnivores alike will love these.

Veggies get a bad rap&mdashand these veggie-lovers are out to change that. Every one of these cookbooks features inventive, plant-based recipes that'll make you rethink the way you eat.

If you think eating plant-based sounds less-than, think again. It's clear from this cover&mdashwhich features a beet juice-splattered apron and a meat cleaver&mdashthat the brothers who penned this cookbook are out to prove otherwise. They scored Woody Harrelson to introduce the book, which has veggie-forward twists on comfort food, like cauliflower ribs and mushroom steaks.

If you think vegans can't enjoy southern food like crispy fried "chicken," smoky gumbo, and spicy hush puppies, you're wrong! Author Jenné Claiborne took the meals of her childhood growing up in Atlanta and has given them a vegan twist in this cookbook.

Angela Liddon, the brains behind the Oh She Glows blog, came out with her first cookbook in 2014. Nearly five years later, it's still a major hit. The recipes are vegan, and many are allergy-friendly. You can also take the word of the more than 1,500 Amazon reviewers who've given the book five stars.

Mark Bittman&mdasha former NYT food columnist&mdashhas written six versions of his How To Cook Everything cookbook. They're all great, but this circa-2007 vegetarian one is crediting with making plant-based eating accessible to the masses. The updated 2017 version (seen here) has new charts, larger pictures, and a new section on smoothies.

You could eat every meal for days with the delicious recipes in this cookbook. The food takes its inspiration from the far of places like Barbados, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad, so you can find Caribbean sushi, cassava pancakes, cocktails, teas, and more. Barbadian chef Taymer Mason has outfitted this book with more than 200 recipes so you'll never have a boring meal again.

Every recipe the Minimalist Baker, aka Dana Shultz, makes must fit three requirements: It must require 10 ingredients or less, use just one bowl or pot, and take less than 30 minutes to prepare. What we're getting at is, this is a great, easy cookbook for newbie vegetarians.

The Nobu restaurant empire is famous for doling out creative, elegant, expertly-crafted dishes&mdashand that's exactly the sort of food you'll find in chef Nobu Matsuhisa's first vegetarian cookbook. You'll find vegetables (especially Japanese ones) prepared every which way&mdashpickled, steamed, roasted, boiled, fried. There are recipes for savory dishes, of course, but also for veggie desserts and cocktails.

After attending culinary school, Laura Wright worked in strictly vegan restaurants. In 2017, she finally dropped her first cookbook to the delight of her blog followers. The vegetarian recipes for every meal of the day take into consideration the different vegetables that come into season throughout the year.

These are the eggplants seen 'round the world. When chef Yotam Ottolenghi came out with Plenty in 2011, you couldn't escape the cover&mdashit was everywhere. And for good reason: Each of the 120-plus recipes is better than the next, and they're all organized by ingredient.


Hellmann’s Creates Rainbow Vegan Mayo for Veganuary

Condiment brand Hellmann&rsquos created rainbow-hued, &ldquomillennial-inspired&rdquo vegan mayo flavors in honor of vegan campaign Veganuary. Each flavor gets its hue from plant sources, including spirulina (blue), beets (pink), turmeric (yellow), and basil (green). The new mayo products will, for now, only be available at the Vegan Rain-Bao pop-up truck on January 17 and January 18 in the Box Park in the Shoreditch neighborhood of London, England where Hellmann&rsquos will be serving up a variety of vegan bao (Chinese buns) for £1.00 ($1.31) while keeping an eye on which mayonnaise flavor is most popular. The menu will highlight each flavor in four options:

  • Candied Beetroot Bao: Salt-baked candied beets, pickled red cabbage, fried red onion, and beetroot mayo
  • Glazed Tofu Bao: Soy-glazed tofu, white sesame salad, pickled green chilli, and turmeric mayo
  • BBQ Jackfruit Bao: barbecue jackfruit, charred pak choi, spring onions, and spirulina mayo
  • Seared Shiitake Bao: Japanese spinach, seared shiitake mushrooms, Szechuan peanuts, and basil mayo

&ldquoWe&rsquore excited to give Hellmann&rsquos Vegan Mayo a rainbow-hued makeover in honor of Veganuary. The bao buns taste as good as they look, and we can&rsquot wait for people to get their hands on them,&rdquo Hellmann&rsquos Brand Manager Rhiannon Lines said. &ldquoWe&rsquoll also track sales in order to identify Londoner&rsquos favorite flavor bao and our &lsquostar jar,&rsquo in the hopes to bring back the special-edition (mayo jar) in the not too distant future.&rdquo

After a long legal battle over the usage of the word &ldquomayo&rdquo with California company JUST (maker of JUST Mayo) that started in 2014, Unilever-owned Hellmann&rsquos developed its own vegan mayonnaise and called it: Carefully Crafted Dressing and Sandwich Spread. In 2016, the vegan-certified spread (which Unilever sells under its &ldquoBest Foods&rdquo brand in some regions) launched in the United States and Canada before debuting in the United Kingdom in 2018 with new &ldquoVegan Mayo&rdquo branding.

Love the plant-based lifestyle as much as we do ?
Get the BEST vegan recipes , travel, celebrity interviews , product picks , and so much more inside every issue of VegNews Magazine . Find out why VegNews is the world&rsquos #1 plant-based magazine by subscribing today !


21 New Health and Fitness Trends for 2019

It&rsquos that time of year again, when MH gazes into its crystal ball &ndash or, rather, calls on a roster of industry insiders &ndash to compile the definitive list of the health trends set to change the game in 2019. So with the help of our fitness futurologists, see how you&rsquore set to spend the coming year.

To paraphrase Sesame Street, your workout will be brought to you by the letter F and the number 45. &ldquoThis will be the year for F45 in the UK,&rdquo says Jared Williams, founder of Fresh Fitness Food. That is, high-intensity interval training with the camaraderie of CrossFit, but not the cultishness. (The F stands for Functional 45 is the duration in minutes.) The Australian import has colonised every territory in its native country and is opening 35 US outposts per month. It plans to have over 500 studios in Europe by 2020, according to Williams: &ldquoAnd you thought CrossFit made a lot of noise.&rdquo

Energy drink manufacturers will be having more jittery palpitations than their highly caffeinated customers, what with the sugar tax and a mooted government ban on selling the beverages to children. Now, they also have healthy competition. &ldquoOur lifestyles show no signs of slowing down, so we&rsquoll see more brands using &lsquoclean energy&rsquo formats to offer the same boost without the obesity and heart disease risks,&rdquo says Future Laboratory writer, Rhiannon McGregor. Crack open a carbonated cold brew from Sandows (named after Victorian strongman Eugen Sandow), or try energy drink Flyte, made with green coffee beans and maca root. Believe the buzz.

Chrono-nutrition &ndash the idea that you&rsquore not just what you eat, but when you eat it &ndash will have its moment. &ldquoTiming food around our circadian rhythms has a big impact,&rdquo says Damian Soong, co-founder of plant-based supps brand Form. Disruptions to your body clock contribute to obesity: not only does insufficient shuteye sap your willpower, but your body also processes macros differently depending on the time of day. Enzymes involved in metabolism are regulated by the clock, too. Wake up to it.

A new type of immersive fitness is making a splash. &ldquoExpect a rise in swimming-pool-based resistance training,&rdquo says London's Workshop Gymnasium founder, Lee Mullins &ndash that is, if you can make it back to the surface while you&rsquore holding dumbbells. Pumping iron underwater was pioneered by surfer Laird Hamilton: his XPT Extreme Pool Training is LA&rsquos &ldquomost exclusive workout&rdquo. XPT now trains coaches in the method, while Virgin Active has rolled out its own Hydro class. You won&rsquot hit a max squat (and shouldn&rsquot try), but lifting in liquid is a solid cardio and core workout that&rsquos easy on your joints. Plus, no one will see you sweat.

You heard it here first: as Alexa, Siri and Cortana usher us ever closer to the film Her, you&rsquoll have audio workouts coming out of your ears. &ldquoSome brands are tapping into this fast-growing digital fitness trend,&rdquo says Laura Hill, senior editor at global news portal Welltodo. The ClassPass Go app offers over 600 guided sessions, from strength work to running, with coaches imparting instructions and motivation. And Amazon-owned audiobook seller Audible has added fitness app Aaptiv&rsquos workouts to its library, guiding you through HIIT, meditation and even sleep.

As an MH reader, you likely didn&rsquot buy the questionable assertions that landed Gywneth Paltrow&rsquos lifestyle website Goop in court. But you are still inundated with nebulous &ldquowellness washing&rdquo. Thankfully, there&rsquos a backlash against fake news. &ldquoJust as the food industry sets standards around organic and GM products, brands will certify their claims,&rdquo McGregor says. For example, UK start-up WellSpoken awards a &ldquoMark&rdquo to approved brands and bloggers. Though who&rsquoll approve these certifiers is yet to be seen&hellip

&ldquoWellness communities&rdquo, designed with residents&rsquo health in mind, will provide a solid foundation for better living. &ldquoWith more of us focused on health, it follows that our cities should facilitate this,&rdquo says McGregor. The global market for these living spaces will reach $180bn by 2022*. But they&rsquore not all affluent enclaves: under the NHS&rsquos Healthy New Towns initiative, 10 UK housing sites will incorporate health services and green spaces.

&ldquoThe biggest new trend in nutrition is the carnivore diet [AKA zero carbs]: eating only animal products,&rdquo says nutrition researcher, Kamal Patel. The illogical conclusion of paleo and keto has already caused much beef between stakeholders and critics. But the impending publication of a meaty tome by orthopaedic surgeon Shawn Baker, one of the diet&rsquos chief proponents, will bring more debate and anecdotal stories of followers&rsquo recoveries from autoimmune diseases. To be fair, Patel points out that randomised trials into its long-term effects will likely never be done, and it may be useful for detecting food intolerances, but he adds: &ldquoIt is, of course, the worst possible diet and an affront to vegans.&rdquo

Swap dad bod for &ldquodad strong&rdquo with your children in tow and burn off their excess energy. &ldquoParents are aware of the need to get active, but time pressures mean exercise isn&rsquot easy to fit in,&rdquo says Steven Ward, CEO of non-profit movement lobby UKactive. &ldquoThat&rsquos why fitness-sector pioneers are offering cross-generational workouts.&rdquo Take your offspring to David Lloyd Clubs&rsquo Prama, a cross between a dancing arcade game and Tron, in which lights and music create a sort of next-level hopscotch. Or spring for trampolining at Oxygen FreeJumping, or kids&rsquo memberships at Virgin Active. Your set, Junior.

As soothsaying sci-fi author William Gibson almost said, virtual-reality (VR) fitness is the future &ndash and it&rsquos already here, adopted in some form by more than 12,000 health clubs internationally. &ldquoVR will hit the mainstream in 2019, as major gym chains such as Virgin Active build it into their offerings,&rdquo says Ward. &ldquoEventually, this will allow clubs to offer personalised classes at all times of day.&rdquo An early adopter is Les Mills: its &ldquoimmersive&rdquo cycling class, the Trip, transports you out of your pain cave to computer-generated landscapes on a cinema screen. Or, if that&rsquos still too inconvenient, you can jump on a virtual bike on its gym floor and take a ride at your (moderate) leisure.


Watch the video: Μανιτάρια σωτέ (December 2021).