Traditional recipes

Boudin blanc recipe

Boudin blanc recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Poultry
  • Chicken

Boudin blanc is a white sausage, a speciality from the Champagne Ardenne region of France. Good thing, as it's marvellously delicious!

21 people made this

IngredientsMakes: 10 sausages

  • 500g cooked chicken, skin removed
  • 250g ham
  • 200ml milk
  • 150g bread (without crust), chopped
  • 1 knob butter
  • 400g white mushrooms, finely chopped
  • 4 shallots, finely chopped
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • 200ml creme fraiche
  • 100ml sherry
  • 100g ground almonds
  • 1 pinch paprika
  • 1 pinch cayenne pepper
  • 1 pinch dried thyme
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 handful fresh parsley, chopped
  • 1 small jar truffle shavings (optional)
  • 1 hog casing
  • 1 red pepper
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 2 tablespoons butter

MethodPrep:2hr ›Cook:1hr ›Extra time:1hr resting › Ready in:4hr

  1. Roughly chop chicken and ham and place in a food processor. Process till well combined and finely chopped. Set aside.
  2. Place the milk and bread in a pan over low heat. Stir constantly till the mixture turns into a paste. Remove from heat and set aside.
  3. Melt the knob of butter in a large frying pan. Add the shallots, mushrooms and lemon juice. Cook and stir till soft and all liquid has evaporated. Remove from heat and let cool slightly.
  4. In a large bowl, combine the chicken and ham mixture, bread mixture and mushroom mixture. Add the egg yolks, creme fraiche, sherry, almonds, paprika, cayenne, thyme, salt and pepper. Mix well with your hands till well combined.
  5. Stiffly beat the egg whites. Fold into the sausage mixture gently. Finally, fold in the parsley and the truffle shavings. Cover and chill for 1 hour.
  6. Soak the casing in cold water for about 30 minutes. Place the wide end of a sausage stuffing funnel up against the sink tap and run cold water through the inside of the casing.
  7. Using a medium sausage stuffing funnel attachment, place the casing on the outside of the tube. Start passing the meat mixture through the funnel, stopping as it just starts to come out the other end. Tie the casing into a knot at the end, then continue passing the meat mixture through the funnel, supporting the sausage with your other hand. Once the meat mixture is finished, tie the other end of the casing into a knot.
  8. Twist the casing at regular intervals to create individual links, alternating between twisting in opposite directions.
  9. Add the sausages to a large pot of lukewarm water with the pepper and bay leaf. Over low heat, bring the water to just below simmering (about 90 degrees C), and hold there for 40 minutes. Drain well and run sausages under cold water to stop the cooking.
  10. To serve, cook the sausages in the remaining 2 tablespoons of butter in a frying pan over medium heat, about 7 minutes per side.

To serve...

Try serving the boudin blanc with a traditional accompaniment, Mustard sauce.

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Boudin Blanc Recipe Ideas

We've been out of homemade sausages for awhile, so we're planning to pick up a leg of pork and casings this week.
Besides Italian, I'm planning to make Boudin Blanc (Louisianna style), basically following a recipe like this:

Cook together ground pork, cream, water, onion, garlic, green onion.
Add cooked white rice, mix well.
Add seasonings (bay leaf powder, sage, salt, pepper, cayenne).

First, any suggestions that may enhance the recipe? I was thinking of cooked ground chicken livers, making a kind of dirty-rice boudin blanc. Any other ideas?

Would day-old, uncovered refrigerated rice be better, or fresh, hot, moist rice, right outta the pot be better?

Finally, how would these puppies freeze? Ahhh, actually, how would they cook up after being frozen? I'm concerned about the rice content not going through freezing and thawing too well - like frozen rice entrees.


Boudin kolaches

When I recently went to go vote, there were boxes of kolaches at the polling station for people to snack on as they waited in line. What struck me was that while there were plain sausage and jalapeño sausage kolaches, this being Dallas, absent was the Houston and Southeast Texas favorite, the boudin kolache.

Now, when I say kolache, what I really mean is klobasnek, as these were the contained pastry that was stuffed with savory sausage, and the kolache is instead the open pastry with a sweet filling. So, some may know them as sausage kolaches, but their true name is kloabsnek, with the plural being klobasniky.

As for those who are unfamiliar with boudin, it’s a rice and pork sausage that originated in Louisiana Cajun country. You might also see it spelled as “boudain” though purists insist that the addition of the “a” is incorrect. There is also a French sausage known as boudin, which is a blood sausage, but the American version gets its funkiness from pork (or chicken livers) instead.

I have a recipe for homemade boudin, which I haven’t made since I’ve returned to Texas since it’s now available to me. That said, while I can find the sausage at the stores in Dallas, you still don’t see the ubiquity of boudin-enhanced dishes that you’ll encounter in East and Southeast Texas, such as said boudin kolaches.

There is much debate about the origin of boudin kolaches, as some stipulate they came out of Louisiana while others attribute the Cambodians that own and operate many of Texas’s doughnut shops as the creator of the combination. I have no idea. What I do know, however, is that they started to gain popularity around 2007 in the Houston area and the Beaumont area.

At first, they were simply a weekend special at Houston doughnut shops such as the Shipley’s on Main. Later, however, they started appearing daily and my first time enjoying one was at V&K Donuts, a Cambodian-owned doughnut shop in the Houston suburb of Jersey Village.

To be honest, I wasn’t sold on the idea of a rice-and-pork sausage being inside a roll, as I felt that might be a bit too heavy on the starch. But as I tucked into the still-warm tender pastry and tasted the savory, peppery blend of pork, herbs, and aromatics, I decided that the two made good companions after all.

There is no definitive way to prepare a boudin kolache, as some simply slice the sausages while others remove the filling from the casing before adding to the dough. Likewise, some pastries are sweet and soft while others are buttery and rich.

For mine, I prefer to keep the boudin in its casing as I find it’s easier to contain in the dough. And my pastry, which is an adaption of an old Czech-American recipe from the town of West (considered by some the kolache capital of Texas), is sweet and buttery.

Making kolaches isn’t a casual undertaking, but once you get your dough prepared, you can fill it with anything you like. In my past efforts, I’ve often focused on the fruit fillings, such as strawberry.

Yet even though I’m back in Texas, there are still regional specialties that are not common across the state. So, I share with you a recipe for boudin kolache, a savory, hearty breakfast pastry that is a distinct taste of Southeast Texas with its appealing blend of Czech, Cajun, and Texan cuisines.

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Homemade Saucisson: Boudin Blanc

Making sausage is really fun and we’ve made a lot of it at Le Cordon Bleu. It tastes much better than the commercial kind filled with chemicals, additives, and un-identifyable meat. It’s not difficult to make if you have a meat grinder (or a butcher who will grind it for you), a plastic pastry bag, and a sausage pastry tip. The trickiest part is finding the natural casing (intestines cleaned) and pure pork fat or fatback (so it won’t dry out). After you get the basic technique down you can get really crazy with maple sausage breakfast links or fiery Italian sausage, the possibilities are endless…

This article is for Matthew Rose who asked me how to make sausage, specifically Boudin Noir. I prefer Boudin Blanc for it’s delicate flavor and lack of blood, however, the methods are the same. The problem with Boudin Noir is finding the blood. Sometimes we get pints of it in the kitchens at LCB for specific recipes like Poulet en Barbouille – pint of pig blood anyone? Blood when it’s cooked binds ingredients together and turns a beautiful dark chocolate color, but it takes some getting used to. Here’s the technique:

Grind all the meat and fat up together. Weigh meat and add salt and pepper to it (20g salt/ kilo meat, 4g pepper/ kilo meat). Then mix meat and all precooked & cooled ingredients together in a big bowl. Load up your pastry bag with meat filing and pastry tip and scrunch casing over the tip then tie off the end of the casing. Gently squeeze away. Make sure not to overfill so you can tie off links with cooking string. Once finished poke a few holes in casing with toothpick, especially if there’s any air bubbles. Boil for 20 minutes then fry up! Voila!

After cross referencing many different Boudin Blanc recipes they all seem to be the same with the exception of whether or not to add breadcrumbs instead of potato starch. Here’s the old tried and true standby sans breadcrumbs…

Ingredients
400 g pork leg, shoulder, or loin (veal or chicken can be substituted)
150 pork fatback
20g potato starch or bread crumbs
1/2 onion, finely diced cooked and cooled (not browned)
6 egg whites
80 ml whipping cream
300 ml milk cooked with an onion and the peel of 1 orange (for flavor)
bay leaf and thyme
pinch nutmeg
20g salt
3g white pepper
1 meter sausage casing
kitchen string

Cooking liquid
500 ml milk
2 litres water
30 ml orange flower water

Instructions
1. Sweat onions with just a little butter over low heat (don’t brown). Add a pinch of salt & sugar.
2. For aromatic milk simmer low (60˚C maximum) with orange peel, bay leaf, thyme, and sliced onion.
3. Mix ground meat with onions, pepper, salt, potato starch.
4. In a cuisinart or blender put meat mixture and blend in egg whites, milk, and then cream till just mixed. Don’t turn cream into butter.
5. Start cooking liquid simmering (68-70˚C)
6. Load up your pastry bag with meat filing and pastry tip and scrunch casing over the tip then tie off the end of the casing. Gently squeeze. Make sure not to overfill so you can tie off links with cooking string. Once finished poke a few holes in casing with toothpick, especially if there’s any air bubbles.
7. Poach in cooking liquid for 20 minutes. Put in ice bath to cool. Then fry up in some peanut oil until golden brown.


INSTRUCTIONS

12 C coarsely chopped green onions 2 12 t cayenne Boudin is the French term for the blood sausage, or "pudding," made with the blood of the pig. Boudin blanc is a white sausage made with pork but no blood. This Louisiana version adds rice and is even whiter.

Makes 3 sausages, each about 30 inches long.

Place the sausage casing in a bowl. Pour in enough warm water to cover it and soak for 2 - 3 hours, until it is soft and pliable.

Meanwhile, put the pork in a heavy 4-5 quart casserole and add enough water to cover it by 1 inch. Bring to a boil over high heat and skim off the foam and scum that rise to the surface. Add 2 cups of onion, the bay leaf, peppercorns and 1 tsp salt. Reduce heat to low and simmer, partially covered, for 1 1/2 hours.

With a slotted spoon, transfer the chunks of pork to a plate. Put the pork, the remaining 2 cups of onions, the green pepper, parsley, green onions and garlic through the medium blade of a food grinder and place the mixture in a deep bowl. Add the rice, sage, cayenne and black pepper and the remaining 4 tsp of salt. Knead vigorously with both hands, then beat with a wooden spoon until the mixture is smooth and fluffy. Taste for seasoning.

To make each sausage, tie a knot 3 inches from one end of a length of the casing. Fit the open end over the funnel (or "horn") on the sausage making attachment of a meat grinder. Then ease the rest of the casing onto the funnel, squeezing it up like the folds of an accordion.

Spoon the meat mixture into the mouth of the grinder and, with a wooden pestle, push it through into the casing. As you fill it, the casing will inflate and gradually ease away from the funnel in a ropelike coil. Fill the casing to within an inch or so from the funnel end but do not try to stuff it too tightly, or it may burst. Slip the casing off the funnel and knot the open end. You may cook the sausages immediately or refrigerate them safely for five or six days.

Before cooking a sausage, prick the casing in five or six places with a skewer or the point of a small sharp knife. Melt 2 Tbsp of butter with 1 Tbsp. of oil in a heavy 12 inch skillet set over moderate heat. When the foam begins to subside, place the sausage in the skillet, coiling it in concentric circles. Turning the sausage with tongs, cook uncovered for about 10 minutes, or until it is brown on both sides.


Directions

Boudin is the French term fo the blood sausage, or 'pudding', made with the blood of the pig. Boudin blanc is a white sausage made with pork but no blood. This Louisiana version adds rice and is even whiter. Makes 3 sausages, each about 30 inches long.

Place the sausage casing in a bowl. Pour in enough warm water to cover it and soak for 2 to 3 hours, until it is soft and pliable. Meanwhile, put the pork in a heavy 4 to 5 quart casserole and add enough water to cover it by 1 inch. Bring to a boil over high heat and skim off the foam and scum that rise to the surface. Add 2 cups of onion, the bayleaf, peppercorns and 1 teaspoon salt. Reduce heat to low and simmer, partially covered, for 1½ hours.

With a slotted spoon, transfer the chunks of pork to a plate. Put the pork, the remaining 2 cups of onions, the green pepper, parsley, green onions and garlic through the medium blade of a food grinder and place the mixture in a deep bowl. Add the rice, sage, cayenne and black pepper and the remaining 4 teaspoon of salt. Knead vigourously with both hands, then beat with a wooden spoon until the mixture is smooth and fluffy. Taste for seasoning.

To make each sausage, tie a knot 3 inches from one end of a length of the casing. Fit the open end over the funnel (or 'horn') on the sausage making attachment of a meat grinder. Then ease the rest of the casing onto the funnel, squeezing it up like the folds of an accordion.

Spoon the meat mixture into the mouth of the grinder and, with a wooden pestle, push it through into the casing. As you fill it, the casing will inflate and gradually ease away from the funnel in a ropelike coil. Fill the casing to within an inch or so fo the funnel end but do not try to stuff it too tightly, or it may burst. Slip the casing off the funnel and knot the open end. You may cook the sausages immediately or refrigerate them safely for five or six days. Before cooking a sausage, prick the cawsing in five or six places with a skewer or the point of a small sharp knife. Melt 2 tablespoon of butter with 1 Tblsp of oil in a heavy 12 inch skillet set over moderate heat. When the foam begins to subside, place the sausage in the skillet, coiling it in concentric circles. Turning the sausage with tongs, cook uncovered for about 10 minutes, or until it is brown on both sides.


Homemade White Pork Sausage (Boudin Blanc De Liege)

Bring milk, onions, carrots, celery, parsley, 3 shallots, garlic clove, bay leaves, salt, cloves, pepper, nutmeg and thyme just to boil in heavy 4-quart saucepan over medium heat.

Remove from het, cover and let stand 30 minutes.

Refrigerate until mixture is well chilled, about 2 hours.

Meanwhile, melt 1 tablespoon butter in heavy small skillet over low heat. Add remaining 4 minced shallots.

Cover and cook until very soft, stirring occasionally, about 15 minutes.

Purée with on/off turns in processor with pork, pork fat, eggs, flour, Port and ¼ teaspoon garlic until smooth.

Strain milk into processor, pressing down on solids to extract as much liquid as possible.

Blend into puree. Transfer to large bowl.

Stir in currants. Refrigerate 1 to 8 hours. (If processor has small capacity, purée in batches.) Cut sausage casings into 3-foot lengths.

Tie knot at one end of each. Gather 1 piece around tip of pastry bag fitted with ½-inch plain tip.

Spoon pork mixture into pastry bag, pressing down to prevent air pockets.

Pipe mixture into casing, twisting casing every 6 inches to create individual sausages.

Tie know at end of casing.

Repeat with remaining pork and casings. Tie twists in sausage with string.

Bring 8 quarts water to boil in stockpot. Remove from heat and add sausages.

Return pot to heat, adjusting as necessary to maintain water just below simmer (180 F).


  1. Place the pork roast in a large pot of water. (Add nothing to the pot but the pork roast at this time)Bring to a boil and, lower heat to medium and cook for about an hour, or until tender.
  2. As the pork roast simmers, you will notice a brown foam rising to the top from time to time. You need to skim that off as it forms.
  3. Remove the pork roast after it has finished cooking and set aside to cool. Be sure to save the stock. It has lots of flavor in it, and helps make the boudin mixture moist.
  4. After you have removed the pork roast, add green onions and chopped onions to the stock you just saved and boil for about 15 minutes.
  5. Remove from stock with a fine slotted spoon and set aside to cool off. (You need all of this and the pork roast to cool off, as you will be mixing with your hands.)
  6. If you are using a lot of pepper, you may want to use new plastic gloves to keep your hands from burning.
  7. Once the pork and the onions have cooled off, you need to grind the pork and onions together. If you don't have a grinder, you can always use a food processor. The mixture should not quite be as fine as raw hamburger meat.
  8. Once you have the pork meat and the onions incorporated, now it's time to add the cooked rice and seasonings. These you will mix by hand.
  9. First, add the cooked rice and you need to mix this very well, making sure the rice has no lumps in it when mixed.
  10. Next, add Cajun seasonings, salt and pepper, Cayenne pepper, or whatever type of seasonings you like with about 1 cup of the stock you
  11. just saved. Make sure you mix all of this well! That's why you use your hands and get all messy! You want this mixture to be sort of moist
  12. and spicy if you like it that way.
  13. Once you have all of this mixed up, taste test for seasonings. You may want to add more at this time. Again, it's up to your taste. If you need to add more spices, add them now, and mix with your hands again.
  14. Once you have the taste you like, you can now either stuff it into sausage casings with a sausage stuffer or just freeze the mixture and save for later to stuff chicken, pork chops, or veggies, or to make boudin balls.
  15. If you want to stuff the mixture into sausage casings and do not have a sausage stuffer machine, you can always cut the bottom off of a 1 liter plastic soda bottle, insert the neck end into the sausage casing, and stuff it that way. an old Cajun trick!
  16. You may have to put duct tape (another Cajun trick) around the neck to keep stuffing from coming out. This trick was taught to me by my good friend Thaddeus Hebert, thanks!
  17. If you have a long roll, you can tie it off as you go along. making uniform links, just cut off between ties.
  18. If you have stuffed the mixture into the sausage casings and want that great boudin, all you have to do is warm the boudin up, or some people also like to grill them.
  19. If not grilling, you can put them in the microwave, or put them in a pan with a little water. ( I prefer this method over the microwave.) Since everything is all cooked it doesn't take long.

*You can find sausage casings for boudin at Bass Pro Shops, or in some specialty grocery stores.


Boudin Blanc

Americans should not confuse this version with the version of Boudin Blanc made in Louisiana one. The Louisiana version — Boudin Blanc Creole — has rice in it European versions have milk in them.

The meat used in Boudin Blanc can be either minced pork, minced pork and veal, or chicken. The meat is finely-ground and mixed with bread and cream, then seasoned with spices such as marjoram and sage.

The sausages used to be mostly made for Christmas, but they are now made and sold year round. In France, truffles may sometimes be included in the ingredients, particularly at Christmas. In Belgium, for the Christmas and New Year period, they’ll add mushrooms, raisins, and pineapple.

There are many different recipes in different regions:

Avranches Onions, lard, chicken breast, cream, bread crumbs, pork, eggs, salt, pepper. (Avranches is in the Manche department, Normandy, on the Mont St-Michel Bay)
Castres Tarn Half lean pork, half egg panade flavoured with herbs, wrapped in caul, baked in oven
Catalan or Pyrénées Greyish white, added eggs and a good deal of herbs
Classic (made thoughout France) White lean meat from pork and veal or chicken, pork fat, milk, eggs, sometimes truffles, in pork intestines, 5 to 6 inches (12 to 15 cm) long
Havre and Normandy style Light yellow, lots of pork fat with no lean, very fatty, often milk, eggs, bread crumbs, a starch of some kind or rice flour
Mazamet Tarn Half pork rind and half panade mixture based on egg, poached in water
Rethel, Ardennes Lean meat, pork fat, milk, eggs, no starch or bread crumbs. Has IGP status since October 2001. In Rethel, a “boudin blanc” festival is held each April.
Richelieu (made throughout France) Chicken. Sometimes truffles. rich, formed into balls, wrapped in caul fat.
South-West Pork, breadcrumbs, starch, eggs, a good deal of herbs, beef intestines. about 1 1/2 inches in diameter

Regarded as particularly good are those versions made in Normandy and in the Loire valley.


Boudin blanc recipe - Recipes

Any time spent on the grinder/extruder is time well spent.

We’ve been working on our handmade sausage recipes and techniques for almost a year now. We’ve made Texas hot guts, pure pork, Sweet Italian, Polish and a few experimental-style sausages during this time.

The subject of boudin has come up periodically when we’ve been wool gathering and/or bragging amongst ourselves about how good a job we’re doing, but we’d never tackled the legend.

Til now. When we planned our most recent Scrumptious Chef Pop Up restaurant we knew the theme was going to be Cajun so it was mandatory that handmade boudin be on the menu.

Time to get in touch with Johnson’s Boucaniere over in Lafayette and see how the masters go about the art.

Handmade Boudin From The Scrumptious Chef Cooking Crew

We neither asked for nor received an official recipe. We were more interested in technique than anything else. Since Johnson’s recipe is a 70 year family tradition we reckoned they wouldn’t be parting with it anyhow.

It’s how they keep the bills paid.

Here’s our guide to making the best boudin you will ever put in your mouth

6 bunches Onion, green, tops only, chopped finely

3 lbs Pork belly, roasted, finely chopped

12 oz Liver, pork, cooked and finely chopped

8 each Intestines, pig, soaked in hot water

* Add rice, cook according to package directions

* Blend hot rice with onion tops, pork belly, and liver, season heavily with salt and peppers

* Thread intestine onto extruder, tie knot in end, feed rice mixture into feeder funnel at top of machine, as stuffed intestine reaches 6″ in length, spin it to form sausage shape, continue til intestine reaches end

* Repeat til intestines are depleted

Voila. You now have a batch of handmade boudin. This batch size makes 36 sausages, each roughly 6″ long

tasting notes: by using such a small amount of liver the offal flavor was minimal. Personally we love the stuff but we were making this batch for a crowd so we democratized the recipe.

By cutting down on the moisture in the rice you help to maintain the integrity of the kernel.

You could use pork shoulder instead of belly but we chose belly so the links would be juicy with fat.

This is a boudin template, you could branch out in all sorts of directions: make a crawfish boudin, a beef boudin or a chicken boudin for instance.

Several eaters at the food party remarked that this was the best boudin they ever ate. Bear in mind these men are seasoned veterans of the meat markets of Western Louisiana.

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