Traditional recipes

Lemon-Roasted Green Beans with Marcona Almonds

Lemon-Roasted Green Beans with Marcona Almonds

Ingredients

  • Nonstick vegetable oil spray
  • 2 pounds green beans, trimmed
  • 1 onion, peeled, cut into 8 wedges
  • 6 large fresh marjoram sprigs
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon (packed) finely grated lemon peel
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped Marcona almonds or roasted regular almonds

Recipe Preparation

  • Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 450°F. Spray 2 large rimmed baking sheets with nonstick spray. Combine green beans, onion wedges, and marjoram in large bowl. Drizzle with oil, then sprinkle with coarse kosher salt and pepper. Toss; divide between prepared sheets.

  • Roast vegetables 15 minutes. Reverse sheets. Continue to roast until beans are tender and beginning to brown in spots, about 10 minutes longer.

  • Transfer vegetables to bowl. Add lemon juice, grated lemon peel, and half of chopped almonds. Toss to coat; season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with remaining almonds.

Reviews Section

5 Ways to Remix Frozen Vegetables

Growing up, my mom was a great cook and my earliest cooking teacher. But, like most busy moms, she sometimes relied on a little help in the kitchen—spice mixes, frozen ingredients, and rotisserie chickens—to get dinner on the table on time.

How to Put Supermarket Rotisserie Chicken to Work

But my mom always added a special touch: taco meat got upgraded with fresh chopped cilantro, sautéed vegetables were finished with pat of flavorful butter, and roasted vegetables were dolloped with sour cream and grated cheddar cheese, creating a creamy, cheesy topping. My mom taught me a ton about cooking, but the most important lesson was that simple (read: convenience) food doesn't have to mean boring or basic.

Use these tricks, straight from the expert—my mom, natch—and you can turn any bag of frozen vegetables into something fresh and flavorful.


Whole 30, Day 24: Green Beans

Are green beans Whole 30 approved? Absolutely! While they are legumes, normally avoided by paleoesque programs, they are quite plantiferous (is that a word? it should be) and are totally acceptable, along with the likes of mangetout and snow peas. Yeah, these guys have been selectively bred to be eaten, by humans. Sure, you can pick them right off the plant and eat them raw, no special processing, soaking or long cooking needed to make them palatable. So go ahead and enjoy your little green pods.

Green beans always remind me of holidays in France. I don't know how they do it, but French food is always just so incredibly delicious. Just toss some green beans in butter with some fresh herbs and a clove or two of garlic and you can't really go wrong. I like the thicker varieties in curries and the thinner varieties in stir fries and salads. Sure, you could even dip some raw or lightly steamed green beans into your Courgette Hummous from Day 16!

This twist on green beans almondine was taken from www.epicurious.com and is credited to Molly Stevens.

Lemon-Roasted Green Beans with Marcona Almonds
Ingredients:
Olive oil spray
2 pounds green beans, trimmed
1 onion, peeled, cut into 8 wedges
6 large fresh marjoram sprigs
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Coarse kosher salt
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon (packed) finely grated lemon peel
1/2 cup coarsely chopped Marcona almonds or roasted regular almonds

Preparation:
Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 450°F. Spray 2 large rimmed baking sheets with oil. Combine green beans, onion wedges, and marjoram in large bowl. Drizzle with oil, then sprinkle with coarse kosher salt and pepper. Toss divide between prepared sheets.

Roast vegetables for 15 minutes. Reverse sheets. Continue to roast until beans are tender and beginning to brown in spots, about 10 minutes longer.

Transfer vegetables to bowl. Add lemon juice, grated lemon peel, and half of chopped almonds. Toss to coat season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with remaining almonds


Previous posts in this series:
Whole 30, Day 1: Leeks
Whole 30, Day 2: Peppers
Whole 30, Day 3: Celeriac
Whole 30, Day 4: Turnips
Whole 30, Day 5: Spinach
Whole 30, Day 6: Aubergine/Eggplant
Whole 30, Day 7: Broccoli
Whole 30, Day 8: Mushrooms
Whole 30, Day 9: Cabbage
Whole 30, Day 10: Carrots
Whole 30, Day 11: Fennel
Whole 30, Day 12: Sweet Potatoes
Whole 30, Day 13: Chicory
Whole 30, Day 14: Asparagus
Whole 30, Day 15: Cauliflower
Whole 30, Day 16: Courgette/Zucchini
Whole 30, Day 17: Kale
Whole 30, Day 18: Butternut Squash
Whole 30, Day 19: Celery
Whole 30, Day 20: Bok Choy
Whole 30, Day 21: Tomatoes
Whole 30, Day 22: Onions
Whole 30, Day 23: Globe Artichoke


Lemon Roasted Green Beans with Almonds & Shallots


Roasted green beans are one of my favourite snacks. If you have never tried roasted beans…..stop reading this, and go turn on your oven. The flavour and delicious texture they develop once roasted is soooooo good.


I have been wanting to share a roasted green bean recipe for awhile now, but green beans tossed in olive oil and cooked in the oven for 15 minutes seemed a little too simple, even by my standards.


Although this recipe is still very simple, there are a few extra ingredients that really pump up the flavour without overpowering the star of the show, the roasted beans!


The sauce is very basic and contains just olive oil, lemon juice, chopped garlic and shallots and a drop of honey (or other sweetener of choice). The zest flavour of lemon becomes much more subtle once cooked, and the chopped shallots become slightly caramelized and stick to the beans. Before serving lemon zest and flaked almonds are added to the beans for added crunch.


This is such a simple side dish that can go with literally anything, from fish, to steak to a turkey dinner. The leftovers are also delicious cold, and I have been eating them as a salad for the past few days.

Here are a few other side dishes that you might enjoy:

If you make this recipe let me know in the comment section below, I would love to hear what you think or take a photo and tag me (@everylastbite_) on Instagram, I love seeing your photos!


October 21, 2008

Jumbalaya, y'all!

I spent my college years fattening up in the beautiful city of New Orleans. The ultimate triumvirate of food, booze and good times make this one of the best places on earth seriously. So this past weekend I brought that triumvirate together again, in my teeny tiny apartment in Washington, DC!

The recipe I am going to share with you is not your traditional jumbalaya necessarily, but it tasted damn good so lay off, ok?! The reason I used this recipe in the first place is due to a series of events that began the fall of 2007, when my roommate moved away. I was very sad, but excited to find out that she left me one very decrepit, but working crock pot! There is nothing easier or more homey than a meal ladled steamily out of a crock pot. I used to visit my grandparent's house for Sunday Lunch, a meal that never wavered from pot roast with potatoes, onions, celery and carrots that had been simmering since before church in the morning.

Thus, I found myself scouring the interwebs for delicious slow cooker recipes. I finally found one, from Robin Miller on the Food Network. With recipe in hand, I invited a bunch of friends over for a feast of jumbalaya, corn bread and copious amounts of wine! A friend contributed some choco chip pumpkin pancakes for dessert and we had a fantastic time! That was Jumbalaya Feast #1.

So due to popular demand and the falling leaves outside, Jumbalaya Feast #2 came to fruition last weekend. This time I used some chicken stock I made and froze the week before (another potential post that is waiting in the wings), which made an incredible difference in the flavor. Homeade stock takes jumbalaya to the max(imum flavor capacity!). I whipped up some cornbread, ladled the Jumbalaya over rice, and splashed with tobasco. It was devoured at lightning fast speed, leaving only a little room for the many bottles of wine to fill any remaining stomach space.

Here are a few of the people who consumed it, who all happen to be men (my lady compatriot Kelsey had already moved on to another location). Sorry the pic is so blurry, but I didn't have time to adjust the exposure for fear that this perfect tableau might be disturbed.


Because I know you all want your dinner guests reduced to slavering, ravenous beasts (no offense to those guests who might read this) I recommend you follow this recipe:


The Post-Event Wrap Up (and recipes!)


The Spread!


The turkey finally came out of the oven. And can I say, we did good! The turkey was so unbelievably moist. Taylor had to get a quick lesson in turkey carving from the New York Times while I started to clean the massive mess we had made. 5 minutes later, he was back and hacked up that turkey like a pro. While I know carving is an art, we both decided we prefer the ‘hunk’ method – thick slices of juicy meat, and legs eaten right off the bone. Yum.

We originally picked this recipe planning on using a turkey breast or turkey pieces, but ended up coming home with a whole bird. So we adapted it. Doubled the brine so it’d cover the whole thing. The sauce made more than enough for glazing and leftovers, so no need to double that there (plus, 1/4 cup grand marnier is just perfectly the amount in one of those mini bottles… which if you’ve seen the prices for grand marnier, is all we wanted to buy.)

Cranberry Glazed Whole Turkey

Makes: way too much for two. Recipe from Emeril.

Ingredients
Brine:
3/4 gallon water
2 cups white wine
1 1/2 cups orange juice
1 cup kosher salt
1 cup light brown sugar
1/3 cup chopped ginger
1 tablespoon black peppercorns
4 bay leaves
4 sprigs fresh thyme
(double the brine if using a whole turkey vs. a turkey breast)

Turkey:
1 (6-pound) whole turkey breast or 1 (11.5-pound) whole turkey.
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon Essence, recipe follows

Glaze:
1 (12-ounce) bag fresh cranberries
1/3 cup chopped ginger
2 teaspoons orange zest
1 cup sugar
1/4 cup orange juice
1 1/4 cups water
1/4 cup orange-flavored liqueur (recommended: Grand Marnier)

Directions
Combine all of the brining liquid ingredients in a large non-reactive container (a giant ziplock works perfectly!) and stir to dissolve the salt and sugar. Rinse the turkey well under cold running water. Place the turkey in the brine, cover, and refrigerate, turning occasionally, for at least 12 hours and up to 24 hours.

While the bird is brining, make the cranberry glaze by combining the cranberries, ginger, orange zest, sugar, orange juice, and water in a medium saucepan. Bring to a boil over high heat, stirring occasionally, and reduce to a simmer. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes, or until cranberries burst and sauce is very thick. Strain through a fine mesh sieve into a mixing bowl to cool. When cooled, add the liqueur and stir to combine. Cover and refrigerate until you are ready to glaze the bird. (Make sure to return the glaze to room temperature before serving. If the glaze gets too thick, thin it with a bit of water.)

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Remove the turkey from the brine and discard the brine. Place the turkey, breast side up, in an aluminum foil lined roasting pan. Pat dry with paper towels. Rub the turkey with the vegetable oil and sprinkle on all sides with Essence.

Roast the turkey until it is golden brown and almost done, which always takes longer than you think it will, so start early. Remove the turkey from the oven and brush all over with about 1/3 cup of the cranberry glaze. Return the turkey to the oven and continue cooking until an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the breast registers 160 to 165 degrees F, about 10 minutes longer. (If the turkey begins to get too dark before it is cooked through, cover loosely with aluminum foil until it reaches the desired temperature. Transfer to a platter and let rest at least 30 minutes before carving.

Carve into *thick* slices. Serve with the remaining glaze passed at the table.

These potatoes are SO good. People often make garlic mashed potatoes, but what’s the point when you can’t even taste the garlic? I mean, 1 pound of garlic is just the beginning! We also made a variation on these potatoes last year, but added about 1/2 cup fresh basil to the puree. Gives them an extra kick and a nice green hue. Also, sneak some soy creamer in there instead of the whipping cream… no one will ever know the difference!

The original recipe is a bit liquidy… we actually used double the potatoes (4lbs) but the same amount of butter/creamer.

The Definitive Mashed Potato with Roasted Garlic

Ingredients
For the Garlic Paste:
1 pound whole garlic heads
1/2 cup pure olive oil
Gray sea salt and freshly ground pepper

2 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes
3 sticks unsalted butter, at room temperature
1 tablespoon garlic paste
1 1/2 cups heavy cream, or more to taste
Sea salt, preferably gray sea salt, and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 to 2/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Directions
Start with the roasted garlic: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.

Peel the outermost layers of skin off the heads of garlic. Cut off the top 1/3 of the heads to open the cloves. Drizzle with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Wrap in aluminum foil and cook for 30-45 minutes, or until soft (almost mushy) and golden. Remove from heat and let cool. Pop garlic cloves from their skins and place cloves in a food processor, along with 1/4 cup olive oil. Puree until smooth you should have a paste-like consistency.

For the potatoes: Cube the potatoes. Then put the potatoes in a large saucepan with salted cold water and place in the refrigerator overnight (or 30 minutes. whatever you have time for!). Add some more salt and then bring to a boil over high heat. Cook until tender, about 10 minutes. Drain well, place potato cubes in a food mill, and grind to remove skins. Alternatively, smash the potatoes with a large fork or potato masher.

Heat 1 tablespoon of the butter in a large saucepan over medium heat until the butter stops foaming and turns a light brown. Add the garlic paste and cook quickly. Add the cream, season, to taste, with salt and pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and fold in potatoes with a wooded spoon or large whisk. Add the remaining butter by tablespoons, stirring after each addition. Stir in the extra-virgin olive oil. Season with salt and pepper, to taste, and serve.

A nice twist on typical cranberry sauce. Though we might have added a bit too much cardamom… the sauce had a very strong flavor. If anything, add less than you think you need. But the vanilla, oh the vanilla! Why I’ve never had cranberry sauce with vanilla before, I do not know! We probably didn’t *need* to make this as the leftover glaze from the turkey was more than enough… but I’m very glad we did!

Cranberry Sauce with Vanilla Bean and Cardamom

Makes 2 1/2 cups. Recipe from Epicurious.

Ingredients
1 (12-ounce) bag fresh cranberries
1 cup sugar
1 cup water
2 1/4 teaspoons finely grated orange peel
1/2 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon cardamom seeds, lightly crushed, from green cardamom pods
1 vanilla bean

Directions
Combine first 5 ingredients in heavy medium saucepan. Add cardamom. Split vanilla bean lengthwise in half scrape seeds into cranberry mixture and add bean. Bring to boil, stirring often. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer until most of cranberries burst, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes. Transfer sauce to medium bowl. Cool, cover, and refrigerate cranberry sauce. DO AHEAD Basic Cranberry Sauce can be prepared 1 week ahead. Keep refrigerated.

I’m sure these would have been out of this world with marcona almonds. But we couldn’t find, nor afford marcona almonds. Nevertheless, they were delicious and a unique way to cook green beans. We actually used some pearl onions instead of regular onions, because we had some left and they seemed like they’d work nicely, which they did!

Lemon-roasted Green Beans with Almonds

Makes 8 servings. Recipe from Epicurious.

Ingredients
Nonstick vegetable oil spray
2 pounds green beans, trimmed
1 onion, peeled, cut into 8 wedges
6 large fresh marjoram sprigs
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Coarse kosher salt
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 teaspoon (packed) finely grated lemon peel
1/2 cup coarsely chopped Marcona almonds or roasted regular almonds

Directions
Position 1 rack in top third and 1 rack in bottom third of oven and preheat to 450°F. Spray 2 large rimmed baking sheets with nonstick spray. Combine green beans, onion wedges, and marjoram in large bowl. Drizzle with oil, then sprinkle with coarse kosher salt and pepper. Toss divide between prepared sheets.

Roast vegetables 15 minutes. Reverse sheets. Continue to roast until beans are tender and beginning to brown in spots, about 10 minutes longer.

Transfer vegetables to bowl. Add lemon juice, grated lemon peel, and half of chopped almonds. Toss to coat season with salt and pepper. Sprinkle with remaining almonds.

These were good, but we both felt we only tasted the bacon and not the sweet potato. Out of our over the top unbelievably good meal, these were the one thing we could have left out and not missed. If you’re interested, the recipe is over here… but maybe try cooking the potatoes in some olive oil instead of bacon fat, and then just sprinkling the bacon on top at the end. Oh, and be sure you don’t forget to buy the scallions. That could have helped a bit.

But what about the pie? Oh yes, the pie. You saw what it looked like fresh out of the oven. I was attempting to do this recipe from Epicurious, Pumpkin Pie Brulee. I added an additional egg and another vanilla bean (split and scraped) to the filling, and used the aforementioned Vodka Pie crust with amaretto. So far, so good. Then I went to do the sugar topping in the broiler… whoever decided that broiling something would carmelize the sugar quicker than it would burn the crust was deranged. Maybe 2 grains had melted when the edges of the crust started smoking. So we ended up eating a slightly singed pumpkin pie with granulated sugar sprinkled on top. A good pie nonetheless, less sweet than our Pumpkin Praline Pie. Plus it makes a darned good breakfast the day after. :)


Epicurious Recipes

  • Ginger Garlic Green Beans

Green beans cooked crisp-tender retain their vivid color and snap, bringing .

This light and satisfying soup highlights the earthy flavor of the greens.

In this take on bruschetta, the toasts are spread with a fava puree and top .

This vegetarian main course is satisfying and flavorful.

This recipe calls for aged Sherry (instead of vinegar), which gives the dre .

In another case of less is more, at-their-peak green beans—an old fav .

Farro is a nutty-flavored grain that's popular in Tuscany. It's not as heav .

Most people keep celery salt around primarily for Bloody Marys, but its gra .

Crisp beans are paired with sour onions and a sweet maple dressing.

Food editor Lillian Chou visited The Conscious Gourmet at their location in .

Orzo, Green Bean, And Fennel Salad With Dill Pesto

Food editor Gina Marie Miraglia Eriquez's grandmother used to serve tender .

More festive than your usual bagel and lox, this jar layers arugula and gre .

Even if you're a fan of the traditional green bean casserole, you might wan .

This is a fresh twist on green beans amandine. Marcona almonds, from Spain, .

It looks like a Japanese roll—but it's not! Green beans stand in for t .

Green Beans With Sage And Pancetta

Liberate your green beans from casserole purgatory with a lively mix of but .

Avgolemono, the tangy Greek sauce of egg yolks and lemon, combines with pas .

This dish is a welcome departure from run-of-the-mill sides. Lemon zest and .

Cut the green beans and bell pepper while the tofu marinates.

Despite the fact that they require few ingredients and little effort, these .

This recipe uses what is known in Indian cooking as a tarka — hot oil .


LIGHT & FRESH

Banh Mi Bowls- (Budget Bytes) This was a first-time recipe for me, and wow– so much flavor! Pork meatballs mixed with ginger and soy, pickled carrots and onions, jasmine rice.

Banh mi bowls

Salmon, broccoli, and sweet potatoes– One of my favorite meals. Linking you back to my own post where I walk you through how to time this meal to come out perfectly.

Perfection on a plate to me!

Fully Loaded Baked Potato Soup- (What’s Gaby Cooking) Pure comfort! I’ll be honest– this soup is a labor of love between baking the potatoes, cooking bacon, frying the potato skins (be sure to add salt!) etc… but it is perfect for a cozy weekend day project that is totally worth it.

Loaded baked potato soup

Red Lentil Soup with Lemon- (NYT Cooking) Soup like this is so easy to make with pantry staples! Customize it based on what you like and what you have. Pairs well with homemade bread… read on!


Thanksgiving Feast, Quaff – AND BEER!

Thanksgiving for me starts in September. Recipes are perused, shopping list is made, and the kitchen gets scrubbed. Every year, the meal changes, but one thing remains the same: 7 courses, prepared over 3 days and savored for 6 hours by 17 of my family and friends: and there is always a theme.

Our feast and quaff hit new heights in 2007. The Christmas before, my husband, Sam and his brother, Ben discovered beer brewing. Due to their new passion, our Thanksgiving of 2007 was to be centered on beer and not just any beer, but REALLY WONDERFUL BEER!

Now – I love food – actually, I am quite passionate about food, but beer – well, that’s another story. I am a wine drinker, and do not care much about beer (please don’t tell Sam that!), but this meal had to be FABULOUS and the beer had to be PERFECT.

In October, I had a conversation regarding my plans with the Sommelier at our local New Seasons. He was quite impressed, but did not have the knowledge of beer to help me out. Enter our beer expert from New York, Jonh (yes, that’s how it is spelled). After a plethora of emails back and forth, our meal was created! It was perfect and has yet to be outdone!

I included the recipe for the Wild Mushroom Strudel – absolutely Fabulous and a real show stopper!

The most delicious dessert was suggested by Jonh – easy to make and amazing! Tastes like an adult caramel apple.

Buon appetito!
This is my first entry in Lets Blog Off – I hope you enjoy it!

Thanksgiving for me starts in September. Recipes are perused, shopping list is made, and the kitchen gets scrubbed. Every year, the meal changes, but one thing remains the same: 7 courses, prepared over 3 days and savored for 6 hours by 17 of my family and friends: and there is always a theme.

Our feast and quaff hit new heights in 2007. The Christmas before, my husband, Sam and his brother, Ben discovered beer brewing. Due to their new passion, our Thanksgiving of 2007 was to be centered on beer and not just any beer, but REALLY WONDERFUL BEER!

Now – I love food – actually, I am quite passionate about food, but beer – well, that’s another story. I am a wine drinker, and do not care much about beer (please don’t tell Sam that!), but this meal had to be FABULOUS and the beer had to be PERFECT.

In October, I had a conversation regarding my plans with the Sommelier at our local New Seasons. He was quite impressed, but did not have the knowledge of beer to help me out. Enter our beer expert from New York, Jonh (yes, that’s how it is spelled). After a plethora of emails back and forth, our meal was created! It was perfect and has yet to be outdone!

I included the recipe for the Wild Mushroom Strudel – absolutely Fabulous and a real show stopper!

The most delicious dessert was suggested by Jonh – easy to make and amazing! Tastes like an adult caramel apple.

Buon appetito!

Thanksgiving Feast & Quaff ‘07

Hordorves:
Gorgonzola Cheesecake with Crostini & Polenta Crust
Orval & Lindeman’s Pomme Lambic

Appetizer:
Wild Mushroom Strudel
Samuel Smith – Old Brewery Pale Ale

Soup:
Fennel-Potato Soup with Smoked Salmon
Westmalle Trappist Tripel

Salad:
Fresh Greens with Gorgonzola, Candied Walnuts & Raspberry Vinaigrette
Rochefort 6

Sorbet:
Bernardus Wit – Beer Sorbet

Main Course:
Turkey: Pancetta-Sage Turkey with Pancetta-Sage Gravy
Stuffing: Three-Mushroom Dressing with Prosciutto
Potatoes: Smashed Potatoes, Parsnips & roasted Garlic
Vegetable: Lemon-Roasted Green Beans with Marcona Almonds
Cranberry &Grand Marnier Sauce
Samuel Smith’s Winter Welcome Ale

Dessert:
Chocolate-Chile Pot du Creme
Apple Crisp with Rum Raisins
Pomme Lambic & Dulce de Leche Floats
Vanilla Ice Cream
Whipped Crème
Coffee, Tea
Lindeman’s Pomme Lambic

CARAMEL APPLES FOR ADULTS
Pomme Lambic (Lambic is an open fermented beer usually made in the attic with fruit. This one is made with apples).
Take a martini glass, put 1 scoop of Hagan Daaz’s Dulce de Leche and slowly pour the Pomme Lambic over the top. This will be the dessert your guests talk about for years!

Wild Mushroom Strudel (by Kim Cutts)
2 puff pastry sheets, thawed
1/4lb each: Shiitake and chanterelle mushrooms – sliced
1/2lb Portobello mushrooms – sliced
1 T garlic – minced
Pinched salt and pepper
2 T fresh thyme
1 T olive oil
1/3lb Chiantino Cheese, Shredded
¼ c toasted pine nuts
1 egg beaten
Heat a skillet over med high heat and sauté sliced mushrooms with olive oil, garlic, salt, pepper and thyme. Remove from heat when softened slightly and cool. Add toasted pine nuts and cheese and mix well. Spoon mushroom mixture over center of one puff pastry sheet, leaving a ½” border. Brush border with egg. Place second pastry over top, seal edges and cut slices in top pastry.
Bake in oven 350 for 25 – 35 minutes until puffed and golden brown – Serves 4 – 6


Sunday, December 11, 2011

Week 37 - It's the Most Wonderful Time of the Year

It's the most wonderful time of the year, but this year it seems busier than ever. With two holiday parties to attend, and three and a half days of work travel this week, I have no idea if we're going to be able to use much of the box at all. By the time I figured that out, though, it was too late to reschedule the week's box, so we're trying to make the best of it. I traded a few harder-to-use-up items (swiss chard, eggplants) for the delicious strawberries that the farm has had available at their market stand, as strawberries (and generally any fruit) will always get eaten! Quite a few items (lemons, carrots, beets and spaghetti squash) will make it until after I get back from my work trip, so I really just need to try to figure out a way to incorporate a few ingredients into a couple of meals. Following an overly ambitious week, this is going to be a pretty dull week in our kitchen. Hopefully, next week's mad dash to use up what didn't get consumed this week will make up for it!