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Eating Out Is Linked to High Blood Pressure for Young People

Eating Out Is Linked to High Blood Pressure for Young People

A new study shows that eating even just one meal out can raise the odds of pre-hypertension

College students may think eating out is a better alternative to cafeteria food, but they’d better rethink their options.

High blood pressure is an issue usually associated with middle age, but a new study of college students shows that young people, especially those who eat out, should really watch out for heart problems.

The study, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, found that pre-hypertension conditions (which can later lead to serious cardiovascular problems) were found in 27 percent of the 500 students surveyed (all of whom were college students in Singapore), and 38 percent of the students ate at least 12 meals a week away from home, suggesting a link between eating out and high blood pressure. Those with pre-hypertension were also more likely to be smokers and have low physical activity levels.

Even more alarmingly, researchers found that just one meal out per week could raise hypertension risk by six percent.

“Our research highlights lifestyle factors associated with pre-hypertension and hypertension that are potentially modifiable, and would be applicable to young adults globally, especially those of Asian descent,” researcher and professor Tazeen Jafar said in a statement.


17 Serious Side Effects of Eating Fast Food

Fast food. It's cheap, convenient, and predatorily marketed to us when we're young in the hope that we'll be consumers for life. For many companies, that strategy has paid off: more than 1 in 3 American adults consume fast food on a given day, according to the CDC.

But there's a wrinkle in that math. If we eat too much of this stuff, that frequent consumer's lifespan could be a lot shorter than if he'd eaten more food unassociated with clowns, colonels, kings, and freckle-faced girls with red pigtails. Studies have found that the higher the ratio of fast-food restaurants and convenience stores to grocery stores and produce vendors near home, the higher the prevalence of obesity and diabetes, which increase your risk of early death, in those communities.

See, in many cases, fast food is highly processed and contains large amounts of carbohydrates, added sugar, unhealthy fats, and sodium. These foods are almost always high in calories while offering little in the way of nutrition. And when fast food frequently replaces nutritious whole foods in your diet, it can lead to all sorts of bad health outcomes. Derailing your weight loss goals is just one.

Here are 17 serious side effects of a fast-food diet—all of which can happen to your body in a relatively short amount of time. And while you're making healthier choices, be sure you're stocked up on The 7 Healthiest Foods to Eat Right Now.


Disclaimer:

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Comments

Great advice for entertaining at home as well. Its really easy to set out salty chips, cold cuts and other party snacks that are processed instead of preparing yourself.

Control the sodium in the recipes you are making and serve a variety of fruits and vegetables cut into finger food sized bites. Leave out on your bartop or cocktail table for guests to choose from and they’ll be heart healthy favorites.


Your questions answered

May is National Obesity Action Month, dedicated to raising awareness about the health issues surrounding obesity. Obesity is linked to a wide range of health problems and it’s well documented that reducing your weight by 5-10% can significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and some cancers. You can make a difference this month by taking ownership of your own health and encouraging others to make healthier choices.

At LighterLife we offer a weight-loss solution that goes far beyond a diet. It can really help you improve your health.

We’ve asked Dr Kelly Johnston, our Head of Nutrition and Research here at LighterLife, to answer some of the questions you’ve asked us about our range of plans and how they can help you improve your health.

Someone following the LighterLife Total plan, a very low calorie diet (VLCD), will take in around 600 kcal a day. There seems to be some confusion about this type of diet being somehow considered unsafe or unsustainable. What are your thoughts on this?

So, to answer the first part of your question, no, VLCDs are not unsafe. In fact, they are quite likely one of the safest weight-loss plans out there in that they are highly regulated and the products should meet strict nutritional criteria. The LighterLife VLCD provides people with all of the vitamins and minerals their body needs without the extra calories, something which is hard to achieve using conventional food restricted to this calorie allowance.

Above and beyond the typically minor side-effects experienced on a VLCD, data collected from studies in which people have consumed formula diets for weeks at a time have shown no adverse effects, providing the plan is used correctly and accordance with instructions. VLCDs have been consumed safely in Europe for over 30 years and are very much an integral part of dietary management of obesity.

As far as them being a sustainable option, published data from independent academic institutes as well as data obtained from our own clients shows that, contrary to popular belief, VLCDs are in fact a sustainable option for successful weight loss. Once clients have got through the first couple of days in which they switch to fat-burning (a process called ketosis), there is a marked effect on appetite which shows that, counterintuitively to the amount of calories being consumed, individuals simply do not feel particularly hungry and are completely sated with their four Foodpacks per days.

It sounds like there are lots of great health benefits associated with VLCDs. So, if someone has a condition like diabetes or high blood pressure, can they follow a VLCD?

We need to be clear about the type of diabetes we are talking about here. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) accounts for 90% of all cases of diabetes and is in a majority of cases a direct consequence of excess body weight. There is emerging data that, in many instances, it can be reversed through weight loss induced by diet, something which was previously thought to be impossible. In fact, there is currently a major multimillion pound study, funded by Diabetes UK and run by researchers in Glasgow and Newcastle, which is investigating the impact of VLCD usage on long-term remission of T2DM.

With high blood pressure, again this in itself will not prevent you from embarking on a VLCD and in fact there are rapidly reported improvements from people with high blood pressure who report needing to reduce their medications after a very short period of time.

However, we would always recommend speaking with your health care practitioner should you be recognised as having T2DM or high blood pressure and taking any medication for either of these, but definitely, our programmes are certainly an option for you.

Recent evidence reveals that the rise in type 2 diabetes also follows the rise in obesity. Is there anything people can do to check their risk of developing type 2 diabetes?

One of the most effective ways to identify your risk of developing or having type 2 diabetes is to measure your waist circumference, and it only takes 10 seconds.

You can find your waist by using your fingers to find the top of your hip bone and the base of your rib cage – your waist is midway between, roughly where your belly button is if you’re still not sure. Take a deep breath in and a deep breath out, then use a tape measure to measure your circumference at this point.

If you’re a woman with a waist circumference of at least 80cm or a man with a waist circumference of at least 94cm and have a BMI above 25, you’re at increased risk from developing type 2 diabetes. If you’re a woman with a waist circumference of ay least 88cm or a man with a waist circumference of at least 102cm and have a BMI above 30, then you’re at significant risk from developing type 2 diabetes.

That’s a pretty handy technique to know! Now, there are some people who think their metabolism will be damaged if they follow a VLCD due to the rapidity of the weight loss. Can you give us your thoughts on that?

Your metabolism will drop ever so slightly when you’re taking in less energy than your body uses and therefore losing weight – but this happens on every single diet that you go on, be it using conventional food and reducing your intake by 500 kcal per day, or using a VLCD like LighterLife Total.

When you reach your goal weight and increase your food intake again, your metabolic rate increases too, but it won’t be quite as high as it was when you were bigger.This is because your lighter body now needs less energy to function than it did when it was heavier, in the same way that a smaller house needs a smaller heating system to keep it warm than a bigger house.

So losing weight following a VLCD won’t negatively affect your metabolism. Just how much weight can you lose using a VLCD?

Well, the amount of weight loss will vary from person to person, but generally speaking on the LighterLife Total plan we advise that you can lose approximately a stone a month. Again, this figure will vary slightly depending on starting weight, but a stone a month is a typical amount of weight loss and certainly a VLCD will result in quicker weight loss than other diet-based weight-loss plans.

LighterLife provides weight-management solutions that focus on the psychological reasons that underpin people’s overeating and there is significant evidence that a therapeutic approach can provide most people with a much better opportunity to change and achieve a healthier, more fulfilled life. We combine a VLCD with weekly group sessions where trained counsellors use techniques such as CBT to help people find out more about themselves and their relationship with food. This also gives them the tools they need to maintain their weight loss in the long term.

If someone loses a stone a month, does that mean they will regain weight just as quickly when they go back to eating conventional food?

So, as already mentioned, what you do during the weight-management phase is key to helping prevent weight regain and maintaining that weight loss, and the journey is far from over once weight-loss goals have been achieved.

Once you’ve lost weight, you also need to re-educate yourself about healthy eating and nutrition and this process starts by moving onto our Management plan, which provides information about reintroducing conventional foods in a step-by-step fashion. You need to experiment with different foods, portion sizes and combinations and create a personalised healthy eating plan that works for you. Doing that and regularly attending our groups – for which there is evidence that it will help you to successfully maintain your weight – are key for keeping you healthy.

Ultimately, you need to be mindful of what you are eating and remember that, once you’ve successfully reintroduced food, you can either use our Management plan as described above or our intermittent fasting plan, Fast, in which you have four LighterLife Foodpacks a day for two days out of five and eat healthily for the other five days. Both are ideal solutions depending on your lifestyle and what fits in best with your schedule.

I saw on Twitter that you’ve just come back from the European Congress on Obesity where you were presenting research you carried out on intermittent fasting. What did the research reveal?

We presented a variety of data, which has been generated as a result of work with our academic partners at the University of Surrey and Kings College London.

One of these studies showed that after just four weeks of intermittent fasting in overweight participants with larger waist circumference, beneficial effects on blood pressure were seen. So, basically we showed that while participants on both a standard ‘continuous energy restriction’ diet or a 5:2 intermittent-energy-restriction (intermittent fasting) diet, in combination with adherence to healthy eating guidelines, resulted in equivalent weight loss and changes in body composition, the 5:2 intermittent fasting resulted in greater reductions in 24-hour and day-time systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and these were clinically significant reductions.

Furthermore, the same study also showed that equivalent improvements in insulin sensitivity were seen between the two dietary intervention groups and that there were benefits after two days on a VLCD for insulin resistance. So this is clear data that intermittent fasting is a credible alternative to conventional dieting and certainly further work needs to be done to determine if the effects on insulin sensitivity have cumulative benefits over the longer term.

So, you can see there are lots of life-changing benefits with VLCDs and intermittent fasting. In January LighterLife was proven best value £ for lb for fast weight loss on ITV’s Save Money: Good Health. So not only can LighterLife help you lose weight and improve your health, our VLCD combined with our unique behaviour-change programme could also be a fantastic, cost-effective solution for helping to tackle Britain’s obesity crisis.

To find out about our weight-loss plans and find your local group, visit lighterlife.com or call our friendly Mentors on 0800 2 988 988.


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Does Your Family Eat Out a Lot? Watch Your Blood Pressure

By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, March 12, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know that too much salt contributes to high blood pressure, but you might not realize how easily eating out could put you and your kids at risk.

Many entrees at leading restaurants and fast food places contain almost a full day's allotment of salt, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Remember, that's 2,300 milligrams, or about one teaspoon.

With many Americans eating out an average of five times a week, all that salt adds up. And the more salt you eat, the greater the odds for high blood pressure (hypertension), a major contributor to heart disease and stroke.

By some estimates, the average American takes in 50 percent more salt than the daily limit, and this excess starts in childhood. Kids between 6 and 10 years of age take in 2,900 mg a day, while teens top out at about 3,700 mg.

Studies done around the world have looked at salt consumption and high blood pressure. A study of 500 people, aged 18 to 40, found that the more restaurant meals people ate every week, the higher their odds of pre-hypertension. Young people with even a slightly elevated blood pressure level are at very high risk of full-blown hypertension.

About 80 percent of the salt consumed has been added by manufacturers of processed foods or at restaurants. While the salt in hundreds of processed foods has gone down slightly in recent years, a Harvard study reported that it has gone up in many fast food items.

To protect yourself and your family when dining out, ask about the salt content of meals you're thinking of ordering. Restaurants with 20 or more locations must provide this on request, and many chains post the numbers online. Finally, resist reaching for the salt shaker.


Copyright © 2019 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Dinner ideas for type 2 diabetes

A person can manage diabetes through a combination of exercise, healthcare, and careful dietary planning. Dinnertime can be varied, flavorsome, and fulfilling for people who have diabetes.

The Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention (CDC) report that in the United States, over 30 million people currently have diabetes and another 84 million adults have prediabetes, with 90 percent of them being unaware.

In this article, we look at some exciting, nutritious dinnertime options for people with diabetes. We also explain important considerations when eating at a restaurant or cooking for others and discuss how to manage alcohol intake.

Share on Pinterest Dinner need not be bland for people with diabetes.

Following a healthful diet does not have to mean that people with any type of diabetes have to give up their favorite foods.

The key is eating appropriate amounts and making sure there is a balance between proteins, carbohydrates, and fats, with an emphasis on fiber.

The following are classic American meals suitable for a person with diabetes. People can apply these to a range of individualized meal plans, as long as they carefully control the portions.

  • Steak: Stick to 3-ounce (oz) portions. People should avoid or limit the amount of butter when cooking steak. Choose center cuts for less marbling and fat. While the occasional, 3-oz steak will not make too much difference within a diabetes diet, those with the condition should limit red meat intake. Apply the same caution when choosing cuts of lamb, veal, or pork.
  • Regular or sweet potato: Skip high-fat add-ons and toppings, such as bacon, sour cream, and butter. Substitute sour cream for Greek yogurt, which can provide protein and healthful bacteria.
  • Garden salad: Add vinaigrette for taste instead of using pre-packaged salad dressings. Packaged dressings can have a high salt content.
  • Salmon: This fish is high in omega-3 fatty acids, which may reduce the risk of heart disease and inflammation. Baking or grilling wild salmon is a good way to avoid adding extra fat to the meal. Other oily fish options for diabetes include albacore tuna, mackerel, sardines, and trout.
  • Steamed asparagus: Steaming is a healthful way to prepare vegetables. Be sure to choose low-glycemic-index (GI) vegetables, such as broccoli, tomatoes, green beans, and eggplant. These vegetables increase blood glucose at a slower, more manageable rate, decreasing the risk of a blood sugar spike.
  • White meat: Roasted turkey or chicken is a good choice. Be sure to remove the skin, which contains high levels of saturated fat.
  • Burgers: Wrap the patty in lettuce instead of using rolls, or eat only half of the bun to limit carbohydrate intake.

Exercising after any meal can reduce blood sugar. Physical activity allows the muscles to remove glucose from the bloodstream without insulin. This is especially helpful after consuming the occasional sweet treat or heavy meal.

Tips for quick, healthful meals

The following tips may help people with diabetes create healthful and interesting dinners:

  • Keep a supply of frozen vegetables, low-sodium canned tomatoes, and low-sodium canned beans.
  • Consider serving salad as an entrée.
  • Eggs can be great for dinner, too. An omelet serves as an excellent source of protein.
  • Prepare a batch of slow-cooker chili for storage and consumption over several days. Limit serving size to about one cup of chili and include a large salad or a side of veggies with this filling entrée.
  • Combine frozen vegetables with a whole-grain or chickpea pasta for higher fiber, toss them into a stir-fry, or add them to a frozen, whole-wheat pizza crust.
  • Enjoy corn tacos with rotisserie chicken, vegetables, salsa, and non-fat Greek yogurt.

A person with diabetes may have to take a dose of rapid- or short-acting insulin after a meal, even if they have a pump that provides slower-acting insulin to regulate blood sugar outside of mealtimes.

It is important to discuss an appropriate insulin dose with a healthcare provider who specializes in diabetes management.

Maintaining a consistent, well-balanced diet can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels under control.

Portion control is also important. The “plate method” is a tool to help people control portion size more easily.

Several organizations, including the American Diabetes Association, endorse this method. It can be very useful for planning dinners and developing meal plans.

Follow these simple steps:

  1. Draw an imaginary line down the center of your plate.
  2. Divide one half into two further sections, so that your plate now consists of three parts.
  3. Fill the biggest section, half the plate, with non-starchy vegetables, such as spinach, green beans, salsa, mushrooms, broccoli, or others.
  4. Use proteins to fill one of the smaller sections, or a quarter of the plate. Healthful options include skinless chicken, salmon, shrimp, tempeh or tofu, eggs, and lean turkey. Legumes can fit in either the protein or the starch section as they provide both nutrients.
  5. Grains, legumes and starchy vegetables can fill the remaining quarter. These could include corn, beans, sweet potatoes, quinoa, and whole grain bread.
  6. Complete the meal with a serving of fruit or dairy.

This method allows people with diabetes to more easily visualize their nutrient intake.

Diabetes-friendly dinners do not have to exclude a dessert or treat. Holding back on carbohydrate-rich foods during the main part of the meal, such as bread or pasta, means that a person with diabetes can spend the “saved” carbohydrates on a small serving of dessert.

Remember to take a blood sugar reading 2 hours after a meal.

People with diabetes do not have to limit themselves to bland foods.

The following meal ideas offer a wide range of healthful meal options, including:

  • one cup of Spanish-style brown rice mixed with pinto beans, chicken, and salsa
  • cod fillets with puttanesca sauce, green beans, and quinoa
  • tempeh or tofu stir-fry with a mix of Asian vegetables
  • caribbean red snapper, a small baked sweet potato, and vegetables
  • shakshuka, a spicy, North African egg dish
  • Dijon chicken, baked sweet potato fries, and steamed broccoli
  • skillet whole-wheat or corn tortilla pizza
  • bean and wild rice burgers with spinach and avocado salad
  • asian salmon fillets, shredded cabbage and peanut ginger sauce, zucchini, and chickpea or bean noodles
  • shrimp tacos, using 100 percent corn tacos, pineapple salsa, jicama (yam bean), and carrot and bell pepper slaw
  • add extra vegetables to a meal by using a spiralizer to make zucchini “noodles,” trying cauliflower “rice,” or using squash instead of pasta.

A doctor will prescribe an individualized meal plan, so people with diabetes should follow this closely.

When planning to switch out certain foods or prepare the meals above, research the nutritional content to make sure the alternative is safe for your meal plan.

Although people with diabetes can eat most foods in moderation, they need to keep their blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels within the target range, as they have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke.

The first step in planning healthful dinners for family members or friends with diabetes is to balance the levels of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats, while providing enough fiber.

By using the “plate method” to plan the basic framework of a meal, it is much easier to produce healthful and flavorful options that will be safe and nutritious for everyone.

As well as the examples above, the American Diabetes Association offers an extensive list of recipe ideas.

If an individual has a specific time range during which they need to eat, such as those following an insulin regimen for type 1 or type 2 diabetes, be sure to serve up any meals within this period.

Carbohydrate counting and GI

While it is important to limit and be aware of carbohydrate intake, carbohydrate counting is now a less vital part of diet management.

No single amount of carbohydrates works for everyone, so the doctor will individualize a target carb range as part of an individualized meal plan.

The type of carbohydrate is more important. The Glycemic Index (GI) is a method that scientists developed to measure the speed at which a particular carbohydrate releases glucose into the bloodstream.

Foods with a high GI number , such as rice and watermelon, increase blood glucose more rapidly than foods with a lower ranking. Low-GI foods, such as apples, release glucose more slowly, making blood glucose easier to bring down.

Knowing the carbohydrate content of foods can help individuals eat appropriate amounts at each meal or snack and still enjoy a varied and satisfying diet.

People who have diabetes should closely monitor portion size and balance high-GI foods with a protein, healthy fat, or fibrous, lower-GI food choice.

Portion control

The biggest challenge within a diabetes diet might be strict portion control. This is particularly true when a person eats their meal in a hurry.

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, portion sizes in American restaurants have increased by 200–300 percent in the last 20 years and might be a factor in the country’s rising obesity rates.

These giant servings can cause huge blood sugar spikes for people with diabetes. They should ask servers about portion size, take some of the food to-go, or share the serving with other people at the table.

The “plate method” is an effective tool for portion control when preparing meals at home.

Alcohol

Many people enjoy having a glass of wine or lager with their meal. However, people with diabetes need to be cautious about drinking alcohol, because it can seriously affect blood sugar levels.

However, one drink per day alongside food might be safe for women with diabetes, and two may be safe for men as an accompaniment to food.

Health authorities consider one drink to be a 12-ounce (oz) serving of beer, a 5-oz serving of wine, or 1.5 oz of distilled spirits, such as whiskey or vodka.

Avoid drinking alcohol when blood sugar is low or without also eating food. It is best to avoid craft beers, which often contain a far higher number of calories and alcohol content than light beers and lagers.

Calorie-free mixers, such as club soda, can also help reduce the health impact of alcohol for people with diabetes.

If a person with diabetes is taking metformin to manage blood glucose, alcohol might also interact with the medication and increase the risk of severe health problems, such as lactic acidosis, a life-threatening complication.

People should check their blood sugar levels and meet with their doctor and dietitian to find out whether any amount of alcohol is acceptable within their treatment plan.

People with diabetes have much to consider when eating at a restaurant.

  • Preparation: People with diabetes should find out how the chef has cooked any meat or fish. Order grilled, roasted, or baked meats, or choose a vegetarian option.
  • The contents of a sauce or soup: Choose broths over cream-based soups. Ask waiters to serve sauce and salad dressing on the side.
  • Ratios of different ingredients: It is important to identify the balance of vegetables and carbohydrates in the meal. Request steamed vegetables when possible.
  • Cuts of meat: Lean cuts of meat are best for people with diabetes. Be sure to trim any fat from the meat.
  • Making substitutions: Instead of choosing french fries or potatoes, go for non-starchy beans, cooked vegetables, or a salad.
  • The types of carbohydrates: Always select whole-grain options, such as whole wheat bread and pasta, if possible. Legumes and fruits are higher in fiber and are great carbohydrate choices for people with diabetes.

Portion size is also important. Take home half the meal to go, or share it with the table.

There are some foods and drinks that a person with diabetes should either avoid or strictly limit.

  • fried foods
  • sweets
  • sweetened beverages, such as blended coffee drinks, soda, sweet tea, or juice
  • white rice and white breads
  • “loaded” baked potatoes or nachos with excessive toppings
  • dishes with rich, creamy sauces
  • alcoholic beverages
  • artificial sweeteners

When people with diabetes plan dinner, a wide range of menu options are available and safe.

The main focus should be on controlling portion size and eating the recommended amounts of fiber, protein, and healthful fats. This becomes especially important when eating in restaurants.

A person who has diabetes may drink alcohol, but it is best to do so in moderation and alongside food.


How to Enjoy Dining Out with High Blood Pressure

When high blood pressure has afflicted us, we carry it along like a cross wherever we go, including the restaurants. Dining out with high blood pressure is a test us of our will power to avoid sumptuous meals laden with sodium and potassium rich foods in the restaurant. This may mean breaking the carefully planned meals laid out by your dietician.

Normally, foods from the restaurant are prepared in the central kitchen where the frozen food is also found. To preserve the foods, salt is added and some sauces used may come from ready to serve cans. Hence, the amount of salt and potassium in a particular food is hard to account.

Nevertheless, to at least provide you a little dining pleasure, here is a list of foods you can eat when dining out:

1 . No sauce broiled fish, meat and fowl.

2 . Vegetables prepared without salt and olive oil if possible.

3 . Steamed to perfection vegetables like broccoli, asparagus, etc. preferably unsalted.

4 . Potatoes and pasta seasoned in olive oil, garlic, lemon or spices. Better yet, always carry with you your own non-sodium seasoning.

5 . Shrimp, smoked salmon, salad with oil and vinegar, avocado or artichoke and unsalted mushroom.

6 . Mineral water, iced tea with lemon, tea, coffee or soft drinks in moderation.

7 . For dessert fruits, fruit mousse or fruit pie without the crust.

In like manner, there are foods to avoid like:

1 . Soup which may be served from cans or highly seasoned.

2 . Rice rich in carbohydrates.

3 . Appetizers often topped with cheese and sauces.

4 . Bread and rolls which always contain salt upon preparation.

5 . Cheese always contains salt no matter what.

6 . Breaded foods, since batter was used to prepare them.

7 . Foods fried in butter such as squid, chicken, fish or breaded veal.

8 . Food enhancers as a whole which always contain salt and sometimes monosodium glutamate (MSG)

9 . Alcoholic beverages but if unavoidable, try wine with soda (spritzers), a can of beer or a glass of wine only.

Simply eat only natural foods. Moreover, try to relay your message to the chef for the preparation of food with no salt. As a sauce substitute for broiled fish and chicken, Tabasco sauce is a good alternative. You can even request for a salad with the oil and vinegar on the side or even unsalted French fries.

On the other hand, if you will be travelling on an airplane, inform the airline that you are on a low-sodium meal. Give them notice of at least twenty-four hours including the travel time and flight number.

Remember, that it is not only your health that is at risk here but your money as well. So the next time that you think of dining out, keep in mind the foods to eat and avoid. In this way, dining out will be fun and enjoyable instead of being burdened by your high blood pressure.

Alvin Hopkinson is a leading health researcher in the area of natural remedies and high blood pressure treatment. Discover how you can get rid of your high blood pressure for good using proven and effective home remedies, all without using harmful medications or drugs. Visit his site now at http://www.minusbloodpressure.com

Alvin wrote for HealthCentral as a patient expert for High Blood Pressure.


Choose dishes which are based on lean proteins like chicken or turkey (where you can remove the skin) or lean red meats like fillet of pork or beef. Avoid fattier cuts of meat like belly pork or rump steak and remove any visible fat like the fat around the edge of a chop. Watch out for battered and deep fried dishes - even if the contents are lean (like chicken, fish, tofu or vegetables) the coating means they will come with lots of extra fat and calories.

Having a coffee or cup of tea while others have a pudding is a good way to round off a meal

Having a good helping of vegetables with your meal will add vitamins, minerals and fibre and help you towards your five a day, but beware vegetables that come with added butter, cheese sauce or salt. Ask the server for more information and see if there are any healthier alternatives.


How to Enjoy Dining Out with High Blood Pressure

When high blood pressure has afflicted us, we carry it along like a cross wherever we go, including the restaurants. Dining out with high blood pressure is a test us of our will power to avoid sumptuous meals laden with sodium and potassium rich foods in the restaurant. This may mean breaking the carefully planned meals laid out by your dietician.

Normally, foods from the restaurant are prepared in the central kitchen where the frozen food is also found. To preserve the foods, salt is added and some sauces used may come from ready to serve cans. Hence, the amount of salt and potassium in a particular food is hard to account.

Nevertheless, to at least provide you a little dining pleasure, here is a list of foods you can eat when dining out:

1 . No sauce broiled fish, meat and fowl.

2 . Vegetables prepared without salt and olive oil if possible.

3 . Steamed to perfection vegetables like broccoli, asparagus, etc. preferably unsalted.

4 . Potatoes and pasta seasoned in olive oil, garlic, lemon or spices. Better yet, always carry with you your own non-sodium seasoning.

5 . Shrimp, smoked salmon, salad with oil and vinegar, avocado or artichoke and unsalted mushroom.

6 . Mineral water, iced tea with lemon, tea, coffee or soft drinks in moderation.

7 . For dessert fruits, fruit mousse or fruit pie without the crust.

In like manner, there are foods to avoid like:

1 . Soup which may be served from cans or highly seasoned.

2 . Rice rich in carbohydrates.

3 . Appetizers often topped with cheese and sauces.

4 . Bread and rolls which always contain salt upon preparation.

5 . Cheese always contains salt no matter what.

6 . Breaded foods, since batter was used to prepare them.

7 . Foods fried in butter such as squid, chicken, fish or breaded veal.

8 . Food enhancers as a whole which always contain salt and sometimes monosodium glutamate (MSG)

9 . Alcoholic beverages but if unavoidable, try wine with soda (spritzers), a can of beer or a glass of wine only.

Simply eat only natural foods. Moreover, try to relay your message to the chef for the preparation of food with no salt. As a sauce substitute for broiled fish and chicken, Tabasco sauce is a good alternative. You can even request for a salad with the oil and vinegar on the side or even unsalted French fries.

On the other hand, if you will be travelling on an airplane, inform the airline that you are on a low-sodium meal. Give them notice of at least twenty-four hours including the travel time and flight number.

Remember, that it is not only your health that is at risk here but your money as well. So the next time that you think of dining out, keep in mind the foods to eat and avoid. In this way, dining out will be fun and enjoyable instead of being burdened by your high blood pressure.

Alvin Hopkinson is a leading health researcher in the area of natural remedies and high blood pressure treatment. Discover how you can get rid of your high blood pressure for good using proven and effective home remedies, all without using harmful medications or drugs. Visit his site now at http://www.minusbloodpressure.com

Alvin wrote for HealthCentral as a patient expert for High Blood Pressure.


The 15 Best Foods for Heart Health That You Can Eat

It's hard to go wrong with produce when it comes to protecting against heart disease.

At last count, 121.5 million adults in the United States have cardiovascular disease. That's very nearly half of the population. Eating a heart-healthy diet can make a significant impact on those numbers, though.

People who ate mostly fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, and legumes and less red or processed meat and sugar-sweetened beverages had up to 20% lower risk of cardiovascular disease, per a 2020 study. In fact, consistent research backs the benefits of a plant-filled diet when it comes to lowering cholesterol and preventing heart attacks and strokes. Paired with regular exercise, it's an important change you can make to protect your health.

"Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, preceding cancer and other chronic diseases," says Stefani Sassos, MS, RDN, CDN, Registered Dietitian for the Good Housekeeping Institute. "A heart-healthy diet emphasizes produce, fiber-rich whole grains, fish, nuts, legumes, and lean proteins. It is low in saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, and added sugar."

Almost every American could benefit from lowering their sodium intake. According to the American Heart Association, nine out of 10 Americans consume too much, increasing their risk for high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke.

Make a change by adding more heart-healthy picks to your grocery list. In addition to fruits, veggies, whole grains, nuts, and beans, healthy fats like those in fish and olive oil also deserve a spot on your plate. And of course, there's nothing wrong with including a little dark chocolate in the mix as well.


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