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Review: The World's Best Restaurant Opens a Pop-Up in Mexico

Review: The World's Best Restaurant Opens a Pop-Up in Mexico

LATimes' Jonathan Gold tastes its beauty and conflict

Noma Mexico in Tulum served a melon clam.

The best thing I tasted last month may have been a lobe of fresh cacao fruit straight from its pod, a pale, glistening thing whose sweet essence whispered of litchi, vanilla and perhaps guanabana, with a crunchy seed whose rich bittersweetness barely hinted at the flavor of what most of its kind is destined to become. The second best may have been a young coconut at whose bottom rested a bit of caviar and a spoonful of coconut cream — I was directed to gently glide my spoon across the translucent flesh, scooping up perhaps a gram or two of the delicate jelly that coated its surface. The third may have been a sliced tiny banana, slicked with seaweed oil and dotted with a paste made with its own burnt peel.

Chocolate, coconut and bananas — flavors as familiar as childhood and as old as time, transformed or detransformed, presented in ways that in retrospect make them seem almost mystically of a time and of a place. And if somebody had read me the last sentence without pointing out that he had experienced these things at Noma Mexico in Tulum, I might have snorted hot coffee out of my nose. René Redzepi’s cooking is transformative, but it always sounds kind of weird.

Read the rest of Jonathan Gold's trip to Tulum on the LA Times.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Everything You Need to Know About Noma Mexico

After a champagne-soaked final night at his groundbreaking Copenhagen restaurant, chef René Redzepi is about to welcome guests to his latest endeavor, Noma Mexico. While the world waits for Noma 2.0, Redzepi, former Noma pastry chef Rosio Sanchez (who now runs the essential Copenhagen taqueria Hija de Sanchez), brand-new Noma business partner Ali Sonko, and plenty of cooks have headed to the beachside city of Tulum, where they are finally ready to welcome the public to the latest iteration of their famed tasting menu.

It’s a lot to take in, so here now, 20 questions that explain Noma Mexico:

1. What is it?

Briefly, this is third-ever full-scale Noma pop-up, wherein Redzepi and company decamp to a new city, set up shop, and open a restaurant for a predetermined amount of time. The idea is to bring the Noma ethos of hyper-locality (you know, like, what some, maybe, might call “a sense of time and place”) to tasting menu dining in different regions. The team learns about new ingredients and culinary styles while also delighting big meal trophy hunters around the world.

The first-ever full Noma pop-up was in Tokyo in 2015, followed by another in Sydney the next year. (Redzepi did a 10-day residency in London in 2012). Tulum is by far the least-populated city to ever host a Noma pop-up for American diners, it is also the closest Redzepi has been geographically. To make the pop-up happen, Noma partnered with American Express and Colibri Boutique Hotels.

2. Where is it?

The website describes the location as “nestled between the jungle and the Caribbean Sea in Tulum.” Tulum is located on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula’s coast line, an area known as the Riviera Maya. Noma Mexico is located on Carretera Tulum a Boca Paila, km 81.

3. How much does it cost?

The price for the tasting menu and beverage pairing is $600 USD per person, plus 16 percent local tax, and a nine percent service charge. Assuming no additional charges, that puts a meal for two at $1,500.

4. When does it open?

Officially, the pop-up opens tomorrow, April 12, but Redzepi and the team have been hosting preview dinners.

5. When does it end?

The last day of the pop-up is May 28.

6. Is it too late to get tickets?

Yes. The reservations via Tock are currently sold out. Tickets are popping up for sale on Craigslist, but be careful who you wire your money to, okay?

7. Does that mean I have zero chance of getting in?

Not exactly. Per Redzepi buddy and Momofuku chef-founder David Chang’s Instagram missive from Mexico (lightly edited for spelling and grammar): “Pro tip: Noma is offering a walk-in only bar menu separate from the sold-out, reservation-only tasting menu. So if you are in Tulum and sans reservations, queue up for the bar.”

(If that doesn’t work, and you find yourself wandering the beaches of Tulum looking for a bite to eat, Eater’s got you covered with 18 other fantastic Tulum restaurants.)

8. What does Noma Mexico look like?

It looks like a jungle-treehouse-fort-restaurant-beach-shack, very of a piece with style of the most famous Tulum dining destination, Hartwood.


Watch the video: Το ελληνικό εστιατόριο όπου τρώει η Μέρκελ. mp4 (December 2021).