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Scientists Working on Creating Lab-Grown Chicken

Scientists Working on Creating Lab-Grown Chicken

The product would consist of meat grown using animal cells, potentially revolutionizing the agriculture and the food production

You could have your chicken and eat it, too, so to speak.

SuperMeat, a Tel-Aviv-based business, wants to revolutionize the entire food industry by rendering poultry slaughter unnecessary. They want to “grow” chicken breasts in labs instead of killing chickens on farms and in production facilities.

That’s right: their hope is that one day, when you think of where your chicken breast comes from, you will picture a man in a white lab coat instead of a weathered farmer in overalls (or a crowded poultry battery). The lofty goals of SuperMeat, as CEO Koby Barak explains, are to “revolutionise the food industry, and promote an animal-free humane solution to world hunger and environmental degradation.”

Since its product comes from animal cells, biologically it would look and taste the same as conventional meat. However, it would have a much smaller environmental impact, would be guaranteed as disease-free, and would not involve any animal cruelty.

SuperMeat has a two-year timeline to perfect its lab-grown chicken breast. Once that project is successful, the company wants to create a device so that anyone — from supermarkets to consumers — can produce homemade chicken breasts themselves.

Animal husbandry has a massive ecological footprint. Nearly 20 percent of the United States’ greenhouse gas emissions come from the industry, and the animals have an outsized portion of both land and water resources. Granted, most of that impact comes from the cattle industry, but SuperMeat’s product would nevertheless help reduce the environmental impact of the industry. It could also make chicken — the world’s second most popular meat after pork — cheaper for people to buy, potentially creating a solution to the too-real problem of world hunger.


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Lab-Grown Chicken Meat Will Make Its Restaurant Debut This Saturday

Earlier this month, Good Meat Cultured Chicken was approved for sale in Singapore. Now, it’s heading to its first commercial restaurant.

For cultured meat—which has gone by many names including lab-grown meat, clean meat, or slaughter-free meat—the question has not been “if” but “when.” The development of growing animal cells into edible meat has continued, only the timeline was uncertain. Back in 2016, an Israeli company called SuperMeat even took a guess, suggesting their lab-grown chicken would be available by July 2021. Turns out they weren’t far off, but they also weren’t the first ones to get there.

This weekend, Eat Just—which until recently was best known for its plant-based Just Egg—will become the first company in the world to have their cultured meat served commercially at a restaurant. Earlier this month, Eat Just claimed a world’s first after getting regulatory approval to sell its Good Meat Cultured Chicken in Singapore. Now, that cell-cultured meat will debut at Singapore’s 1880 restaurant on Saturday to a handful of select diners: “young people age 14 to 18 who have shown, through their consistent actions, a commitment to building a better planet.”

“This historic step, the first-ever commercial sale of cultured meat, moves us closer to a world where the majority of meat we eat will not require tearing down a single forest, displacing a single animal’s habitat or using a single drop of antibiotics,” Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of Eat Just, stated. “We’re thrilled to partner with 1880 to launch a product that will someday be served on the dinner tables of families living in the suburbs of Birmingham, Alabama, to the skyscrapers of Shanghai.”

Eat Just explains that this inaugural event—offered to about 40 total guests in five-person seatings from December 19 to 22—will feature four-course meals prepared by 1880 Executive Chef Colin Buchan, who’s previously worked at a number of Michelin-starred restaurants.

To help tell Good Meat’s story, the meal is intended as 𠇊n immersive journey through the past, present and future of our food system.” But the final course is the star of the show: “three cultured chicken dishes, each bite influenced by a top chicken-producing country in the world: China, Brazil and the United States.”

Specifically, the Chinese-influenced dish will feature a bao bun, crispy sesame cultured chicken, spring onion, and pickled cucumber Brazil will be represented by phyllo puff pastry, cultured chicken, black bean puree, crispy garlic, and lime and the U.S. dish will have Southern flair with a crispy maple waffle and cultured chicken with spices and hot sauce.”

“This is a very exciting collaboration for me,” explained Buchan, who worked alongside Eat Just’s team in creating the dishes. “It&aposs working with new ingredients, something very creative, something we&aposve never quite seen before and I think people are going to love it.”

After this initial event, cultured meat will take a short break while 1880 serves its planned Christmas menu. But Eat Just states that, when the new year arrives, Good Meat Cultured Chicken will be on the menu, with dishes slated to sell for about $23, or “what one would expect to pay for a premium chicken dish” at 1880 usually. In the announcement, Chef Nate Park, Eat Just’s director of product development, simply stated, “We look forward to sharing [cultured chicken] with 1880’s clientele in the coming weeks and months.”


Watch the video: Πώς χωρίζουμε το κοτόπουλο σε μερίδες. Yiannis Lucacos (November 2021).