Traditional recipes

This Chef Thinks Everyone Should Eat More Worms: Here’s Why

This Chef Thinks Everyone Should Eat More Worms: Here’s Why

Ecuadorian chef Juan José Aniceto Cueva thinks we should all get used to eating bugs, especially smoked worms

Get over the squeamish factor.

As climate changes worsen and the sustainability of animal protein-based diets remains in some question, scientists and chefs are increasingly turning to alternative means of feeding people. Ecuadorian chef Juan José Aniceto Cueva says: “Let them eat worms.”

Chef Cueva specializes in authentic Amazonian cuisine, which uses ingredients that would make most of us lose our appetites. But Cueva wants to dispel the notion that dishes like smoked worms are gross or foreign.

“We want to get rid of this connotation that Amazonian gastronomy is exotic, because it isn’t exotic. It is a way of life,” he told Ozy magazine.

Smoked chontacuros is an Amazonian dish that literally means “tree worm,” from chonta, the name of the tree where these grubs can be found. He prepares the worms in traditional cooking stoves. The protein-packed larvae can be served toasted on kebab skewers and have a “rich, unique flavor,” according to Piran Café.

You don’t have to be in the Amazon to appreciate insect cuisine. Here are 9 Countries Brave Enough to Eat Insects Without a Chocolate Coating.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.


This year, Chef Massimo Bottura’s restaurant, Osteria Francescana, was ranked No 1 by The World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards. You may know him from the Netflix original series: Chef’s Table. What you may not know is the Italian chef also founded the non-profit association ‘Food for Soul’ to empower communities to fight food waste, with thoughtfully designed community kitchens in Milan, Rio de Janeiro, London and Paris. All part of his inspiring crusade to use art, design and food to transform spaces and people.

In Rio de Janeiro, at the 2016 Olympic games, Refettorio Gastromotiva, his first International community kitchen was launched. It aimed to promote social integration using surplus food and celebrity chefs to tackle food waste and nourish the city’s poorest. (Refettorio comes from the Latin reficere, meaning ‘to re-make’, and also ‘to restore.’) Essential work in a world where one-third of the food we produce is thrown away and over 800 million people are undernourished. Food for Soul has also opened Refettorio Ambrosiano in Milan, Refettorio Felix in London and Refettorio Paris. So far they have cooked 450,000 dishes, served 150,000 guests and recovered 45 tonnes of food by sourcing quality, in-date ingredients that are perfectly edible but would otherwise go to waste.

Chef Massimo recently released Bread Is Gold, tackling food waste with creativity and the star power of 65 chefs, including Daniel Humm, Alain Ducasse and René Redzepi. Recently speaking at a Slow Food Nations Chef Summit, he discussed the importance of food rescue. Like Slow Food’s pioneers, he believes food can provoke change and tells MetroPlus why this is the age of the activist chef.