Traditional recipes

Warm Shrimp and Escarole Salad

Warm Shrimp and Escarole Salad

Hearty escarole maintains its volume when cooked, which makes it a great choice for a quick sauté with shrimp.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 2 anchovy fillets packed in oil, drained
  • 2 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons drained capers, chopped
  • 8 radishes, trimmed, quartered
  • 1 1/4 pounds large shrimp, peeled, deveined
  • 1 head of escarole, torn into large pieces (about 10 cups)
  • 3 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Recipe Preparation

  • Heat oil and butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add anchovies and cook, mashing with the back of a spoon, until anchovies dissolve and a paste forms, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and capers; cook, stirring constantly, until garlic is fragrant but not brown, about 1 minute.

  • Increase heat to medium-high. Add radishes and cook, tossing often, until crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Add shrimp; cook, tossing occasionally, until just cooked through, about 4 minutes.

  • Add half of escarole and toss until beginning to wilt, about 1 minute. Add remaining escarole and toss until wilted, about 1 minute more. Remove from heat.

  • Add Parmesan and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper; toss to combine.

Recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen,

Nutritional Content

4 servings, 1 serving contains: Calories (kcal) 300 Fat (g) 14 Saturated Fat (g) 4.5 Cholesterol (mg) 230 Carbohydrates (g) 7 Dietary Fiber (g) 4 Total Sugars (g) 1 Protein (g) 34 Sodium (mg) 690Reviews SectionThis recipe was a fast favorite for my family - it's everything you want - love it!!!

Shrimp and escarole salad with radishes and parmesan

Shrimp and lemon are a match made in heaven, especially in this light and clean salad, served over fluffy couscous.

Just one anchovy filet, fried and mashed, is a nod to traditional Caesar dressing, and adds depth and special flavor to the shrimp. It takes no time at all for the shrimp to cook, so keep a close eye and toss often for even color. Cook, relax, and enjoy!

What we send: 2 large garlic cloves 5 oz radishes 1 oz Parmesan 1 lemon 1 small head of escarole 8 oz medium-large shrimp 1 cup couscous 1 pat butter 1 anchovy fillet packed in oil coarse salt olive oil freshly ground black pepper

Equipment: microplane or grater large skillet medium saucepan

Recipe steps: 1. Prep ingredients Peel and finely chop garlic. Trim top and bottom of radishes then cut into thin wedges. Grate Parmesan. Juice ½ of the lemon cut other ½ into wedges. Remove stem end from escarole and tear leaves into large pieces. Wash well and spin dry. Season shrimp all over with salt and pepper.

Make couscous In medium saucepan, bring 1 cup water and a pinch salt to a boil. Add couscous, stir, and cover. Remove from heat and set aside to steam, 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork and cover to keep warm until ready to serve.

Cook anchovy and garlic Heat butter and 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium. Drain anchovy from oil and cook, mashing with the back of a spoon, until anchovy dissolves, about 30 seconds. Add garlic cook, stirring constantly, until garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Increase heat to medium-high.

Cook shrimp Add radishes and shrimp. Cook, tossing often, until radishes are crisp-tender and shrimp are almost cooked through, about 2 minutes.

Cook escarole Add escarole, season with salt, and toss until beginning to wilt, about 1 minute. Remove from heat.

Finish Add lemon juice and ½ of Parmesan. Season with salt and pepper toss to combine. Serve salad over couscous topped with remaining Parmesan, a sprinkle of cracked pepper, and lemon wedges on the side. Enjoy!


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Warm Grilled Shrimp Salad (Emeril Lagasse)

Warm Seafood Salad

Warm Seafood Salad

Shrimp Salad With Warm Bacon Dressing and Summer Bruschetta

Shrimp Salad With Warm Bacon Dressing and Summer Bruschetta

Warm Shrimp and Potato Salad

Warm Shrimp and Potato Salad

Warm Shrimp and Potato Salad

Warm Shrimp and Potato Salad

Warm Shrimp and Endive Salad

Warm Shrimp and Endive Salad

Warm Shrimp And White Bean Salad

Warm Shrimp And White Bean Salad

Warm Shrimp and Orange Salad (Michele Urvater)

Warm Shrimp and Orange Salad (Michele Urvater)

Warm Caesar Salad with Grilled Shrimp and Scallops

Warm Caesar Salad with Grilled Shrimp and Scallops

Warm Shrimp-and-Potato Salad (Food Network Kitchens)

Versatility

There are so many appetizing ideas for escarole.

You can chop it and use it with salad ingredients. It holds up well with any kind of dressing be it warm or cold.

Use a leaf or two as a bed for some meat for presentation. Sometimes it is a good idea to substitute a leaf of escarole for bread for a wrap. it has a great crunch factor.

For a salad, pair with bacon, apples, toasted pecans, dates, and avocado cream-based dressings.

For soups or stews, combine sausage and white beans with the escarole.

Here are other ways you can prepare it: sauté, braise, stir-fry, and add to stew or soup. Spread blue, feta, or pecorino cheeses over a sauté.


The Bitten Word

We've been making lots of salads these days, mostly to atone for this, but also because in the crop of February magazines, it's the salad recipes that looked best to us.

Some are shaved salads others make use of some unusual ingredients. But in this case -- a Warm Shrimp and Escarole Salad -- we loved the idea of a salad that won't chill your bones on a cold winter night. 

Making this recipe was the first time we've ever deveined shrimp. We rarely buy shrimp. In fact, we've only posted a handful of shrimp recipes in nearly five years of writing The Bitten Word. We've pickled shrimp and broiled shrimp. A few other recipes have used shrimp along with other ingredients. It's a pretty slim shrimp inventory. (Blame chicken). Forrest Gump would be disappointed. (Points deducted for dated pop culture references!)

But we do love shrimp. At our local supermarket, the only shrimp that looked acceptable for this recipe were still in the shell. So we purchased a few pounds, brought them home and started shelling. Deveining a shrimp is actually quite easy -- a paring knife is helpful in removing the unsightly dark "vein" running down the length of the shrimp, which is easily pulled out and discarded. 

It's times like this, standing at the sink, deveining shrimp, when we realize we would struggle being restaurant chefs. Deveining just two pounds of shrimp is a somewhat tedious process. A chef working in a restaurant kitchen would face a far bigger pile of shrimp. Like many of you, we have a copy of The French Laundry cookbook. Something Thomas Keller shares in the book always comes to mind when we're doing tasks in the kitchen like peeling and deveining shrimp: "The great challenge [of cooking] is . to derive deep satisfaction from the mundane." We're not sure we could get there perhaps we could. Could you?

Anyhow, dealing with the shrimp was by far the most time-consuming task of making this salad. The rest is darn easy. Sauté anchovy, garlic and radishes in a pan. (Do not fear the anchovy in this dish. It literally melts away and gives the dressing a wonderful umami flavor.) Add the radishes and cook briefly. Add shrimp, cooking through. Add the escarole lettuce and wilt slightly. Serve.

At the end, the recipe suggests grated Parmesan and lemon. We actually found that we preferred the salad without Parmesan. 

But we loved the salad. The anchovy-garlic-caper trifecta gives the dressing a terrific punch of sharp flavors. The shrimp are a nice change of pace from other dishes we've been cooking. And overall, it's a wonderful diversion from cold winter salads. And we all need that in February. 


(This photo: Brian W. Ferry for Bon Appétit)

4 Servings
Total Time: 20 minutes

Notes from Zach and Clay of The Bitten Word:

Do not fear the anchovy in this dish. It literally melts away, and gives the dressing a wonderful flavor. 

We actually preferred this salad without the Parmesan. We suggest tailoring it to your own tastes. 

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
2 anchovy fillets packed in oil, drained
2 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 tablespoons drained capers, chopped
8 radishes, trimmed, quartered
1 1/4 pounds large shrimp, peeled, deveined
1 head of escarole, torn into large pieces (about 10 cups)
3 tablespoons finely grated Parmesan
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper

Preparation

Heat oil and butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Add anchovies and cook, mashing with the back of a spoon, until anchovies dissolve and a paste forms, about 3 minutes. Add garlic and capers cook, stirring constantly, until garlic is fragrant but not brown, about 1 minute.

Increase heat to medium-high. Add radishes and cook, tossing often, until crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Add shrimp cook, tossing occasionally, until just cooked through, about 4 minutes.

Add half of escarole and toss until beginning to wilt, about 1 minute. Add remaining escarole and toss until wilted, about 1 minute more. Remove from heat.

Add Parmesan and lemon juice. Season with salt and pepper toss to combine.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 pound medium (36 to 42 per lb.) peeled, deveined shrimp
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme leaves
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt, divided
  • About 7 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1 ¼ pounds mixed chicories (endive, escarole, frisée, and radicchio), cored, half sliced into ribbons, half torn into 4- to 5-in. pieces
  • ¼ cup chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 tablespoon lemon zest
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 1 can (15 oz.) white beans, drained and rinsed

Toss shrimp, garlic, thyme, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 1 tbsp. oil in a medium bowl to coat.

Heat a large frying pan over high heat. Add 1 tsp. oil and about one-quarter of chicories cook, stirring frequently with tongs, until just beginning to wilt, about 30 seconds (greens will continue to wilt as they stand). Transfer to a large bowl. Cook remaining chicories the same way, adding about 1 tsp. oil per batch.

Meanwhile, whisk together 4 tbsp. oil and 1/2 tsp. salt, the parsley, zest, and juice in a small bowl.

Reduce heat under pan to medium-high. Add shrimp and cook, turning occasionally with tongs, until shrimp are cooked through, about 2 minutes. Add beans and chicories and cook until warm, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and toss with two-thirds of lemon dressing. Serve with remaining dressing on the side.


Geography/History

True endives such as Escarole are believed to be native to Sicily and the Mediterranean region. It has been widely cultivated in England from at least the 1500s. It can be traced back to Greece, Rome and Egypt where it was used as a salad green. There are mentions of it made by Pliny and the poet Ovid in ancient Roman documents. Compared to the narrow leaved endive the wide leaved Escarole is believed to be the eldest variety. Endive is grown today predominately in France, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain and the United States.


Another Year in Recipes

The word “pasta” notwithstanding, the new recipe I tried this week is nothing like an Italian dish. It’s pure California in-your-faceness. The shrimp, beans, and escarole, each cooked separately, plus garlic, lemon zest, and toasted breadcrumbs, all of which dress the pasta, are more like a warm salad than a sauce. And, like most salad components, each tastes purely of itself, with no blending into anything subtle or complex.

I actually liked the combination. But Beloved Spouse, with the heritage of countless generations of Neapolitan ancestors looking over his shoulder at the dinner table, simply couldn’t approve of it. Maybe the fact that I spent three years in California in my twenties gave me a tolerance for the breed or maybe my own onlooking Polish peasant ancestors were just bowled over by all the flavors.

Be that as it may, the dish is from Joyce Goldstein’s Kitchen Conversations. This feisty lady, formerly owner-chef of a major San Francisco restaurant, takes all of Italy, Spain, France, Greece, Turkey, the Middle East, and North Africa as her purview – and turns them all into California cuisine. For my taste, many of her creations are way over the top, but I did enjoy this latest one – with only a few minor tweakings.

Several of the components of the dish have to be prepared in advance, which can be good or bad depending on your schedule. It was fine for me. I cooked both the shrimp and the white beans in plain water in the morning and put them into the refrigerator until needed. In the late afternoon I shredded the escarole and sauteed it with minced garlic zested a lemon turned a chunk of baguette into fresh breadcrumbs in the food processor and toasted them in the oven with olive oil, salt, and pepper.

At dinnertime, I put together all those prepared items (only half the breadcrumbs) and heated them through while the pasta was cooking . . .

. . . then just mixed them into the cooked pasta and topped with the remaining breadcrumbs.

As I said above, these were all good tastes, but none of them did anything much to or with each other. There were very nice textural contrasts, though – and the toasted breadcrumbs were the best I’ve ever tasted. For the first few bites, the power of the lemon zest was almost shocking, but then it settled into the background. I enjoyed the separate strands of flavors, but Beloved Spouse found the absence of harmony unpleasant. So the dish is not likely to enter my repertoire, but it was an interesting experiment.

For the record: My minor departures from Goldstein’s directions were to use less garlic for the escarole, less salt and pepper for the crumbs – she’s always extravagant with seasonings – and less cooking for the shrimp.


Grilled Polenta with Shrimp & Escarole

Place 1 tablespoon oil and garlic in a large saucepan over medium heat. Cook, stirring, until the garlic is sizzling and fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Add crushed red pepper cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add tomatoes and oregano bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until juicy, about 3 minutes. Stir in shrimp and escarole cook, stirring, until the escarole is wilted, about 2 minutes. Remove from the heat, cover and keep warm.

Oil the grill rack (see Tip). Grill polenta slices until hot and slightly charred, 3 to 4 minutes per side.

Divide the sauce among 4 shallow bowls or plates. Top with the polenta slices, sprinkle with olives (if using) and drizzle each serving with 1/2 teaspoon oil. Serve immediately.

Note: Escarole (a member of the chicory family) is a leafy green with a sweet-bitter taste. It's tender when cooked and can be used in braises, soups or stews. Look for it near other greens in the produce section, but do not confuse it with curly endive. Escarole has large, relatively broad leaves resembling densely packed leaf lettuce (curly endive has tight and finely ruffled leaves).

Tip: To oil a grill rack: Oil a folded paper towel, hold it with tongs and rub it over the rack. (Do not use cooking spray on a hot grill.)