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Broiled Pluots with Brown Sugar

Broiled Pluots with Brown Sugar

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August 3, 2012

By

Nina Fomufod

Nina Fomufod

Broiled Pluots with Brown Sugar

For a simple, summery dessert, fruit is the best way to go. This dish highlights the natural flavor of the pluots, while adding a light, sweet layer. For a more robust dish, serve with vanilla ice cream.

Click here to see Apricots and Cherries and Peaches and Pluots, Oh My!

Ready in

10-15 m

2

Servings

66

Calories Per Serving

Related Recipes

Ingredients

  • 3 pluots, sliced
  • 1 Tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 Teaspoon cinnamon

Directions

Place the pluots on a large baking sheet. Sprinkle each slice with the sugar and the cinnamon. Set the oven to broil, put the baking sheet in the oven, and cook until the sugar is melted. Serve and enjoy!

Nutritional Facts

Servings2

Calories Per Serving66

Total Fat0.3g0.5%

Sugar14gN/A

Protein0.8g1.5%

Carbs17g6%

Vitamin A17µg2%

Vitamin C9mg16%

Vitamin E0.3mg1.4%

Vitamin K7µg8%

Calcium23mg2%

Fiber2g8%

Folate (food)5µgN/A

Folate equivalent (total)5µg1%

Iron0.3mg1.7%

Magnesium8mg2%

Monounsaturated0.1gN/A

Niacin (B3)0.4mg2.2%

Phosphorus17mg2%

Potassium167mg5%

Sodium1mgN/A

Sugars, added4gN/A

Zinc0.1mg0.8%

Have a question about the nutrition data? Let us know.

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Pluot 'jam' can make a sweet and savory sauce

A few weeks ago I came home from the market overloaded with fruit and great ambitions for creating jars and jars of preserves. Part of my goal was to practice my skills for a canning class I had organized with Amy Shelf, co-owner of Succulence: Life and Garden, a store in San Francisco's Bernal Heights that sells canning equipment and Amy's handcrafted jams.

I had already loaded up on cherries, nectarines, boysenberries and strawberries that I couldn't resist at San Francisco's Alemany Farmers' Market when I noticed one last stone fruit stand. When I asked if they had any fruit for canning, they handed me a flat heavy with overripe apricots, peaches and pluots for $5. It was a great deal, even though greener fruit is generally better for jam because it holds its shape and has more pectin.

As often happens with these sorts of ambitious kitchen projects, I reached saturation point somewhere about three-quarters of the way through. I had already made two batches of apricot preserves when I took a look at a bowl of chopped up pluots that were destined for more jam. But I couldn't face stirring another pot and then dealing with the sticky mess afterward, so I stuck the pluots in the refrigerator.

Later that night I decided to work the jam concept - and those chopped pluots - into a savory sauce for grilled lamb. Making preserves is all about cooking fruit with sugar until it gels, which can take quite a bit of time, but you can do a simplified version for quick sauces that don't need to be as thick.

Fresh herbs, sauteed onion and garlic provide a savory balance to the sweet fruit, and red wine makes the combination saucy and a bit pickle-y. I added some sugar to thicken the sauce a bit, but not so much that it was cloying. The sauce actually tasted too sour at first, but was just right with the rich grilled lamb and the Syrah we poured with it.

The following week, the jam class turned out to be a fun way to spend an evening. About eight of us gathered in a friend's tucked-away garden cottage in Noe Valley, where Amy shared her canning wisdom and we chopped, measured and stirred for what seemed like forever, then poured our glistening creations into waiting jars (and shared the dishwashing). The event was to raise funds for our kids' school sometimes Amy conducts private canning workshops (go to thesucculence.com) or you can always plan your own jam-making party with friends.

This is the time of year we all need foods to bring to potlucks or picnics. I've been making a lot of whole grain salads lately for this purpose and recently decided to make one with a mix of wheat berries, barley and brown rice, mostly because I had small amounts of each in the pantry.

I started a pan of salted water, added the wheat berries to cook for about 25 minutes, then the barley, then the brown rice. Then I drained them all together and spread them out on a pan to cool.

You can add almost anything from there - but I was pretty happy with the combination of sauteed Swiss chard and crunchy corn, with some chopped tomatoes and a sherry vinaigrette. Serve it as is, piled with fresh cheese, or as a side dish to the Grilled Lamb Chops with Savory Pluot "Jam" the grains' earthy flavor works deliciously with the succulent, smoky red meat.

Either way, you'll have a cooking adventure worthy of a summer evening.

Whole Grain Salad With Tomatoes, Corn & Swiss Chard

Serves 4 to 6

Use this as a side dish for grilled meats, pack it for a picnic food or serve it as a main course salad over lightly dressed greens. For the grains, I like combining 1/2 cup each of wheat berries, barley and brown rice because of the combination of textures and flavors. Each one takes a different time to cook, but I cooked them all in a pot of salted water, adding them at different intervals so they would be done at the same time. You can vary the vegetables by using cucumbers, grilled or sauteed marinated mushrooms, zucchini, eggplant, peppers, or baby arugula.

  • 1 1/2 cups whole grains, such as wheat berries, farro, brown rice and/or barley, cooked according to package directions
  • -- Vegetable oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch Swiss chard, stems removed leaves chopped or ripped into 2-inch pieces
  • 1 ear corn, kernels removed
  • -- Salt and pepper to taste
  • 2 ripe tomatoes, chopped into 1/2-inch dice
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh oregano, thyme, rosemary or chives, or a mix of herbs
  • 4 teaspoons sherry or red wine vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • -- Crumbled fresh goat cheese or feta, or cubed fresh mozzarella (optional)

Instructions: Bring a medium to large pot of well-salted water to a boil. Add the grains and cook according to package directions. Wheat berries take around 1 1/4 hours barley and brown rice usually take between 30 and 50 minutes. Drain thoroughly, then spread out on a rimmed baking sheet to cool you'll have close to 5 cups cooked grains.

Place a large frying pan over medium heat, and add a splash of oil. Add the garlic and saute briefly, then add the Swiss chard leaves, a few handfuls at a time, and cook until wilted, 1-2 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the corn kernels and just a splash of water. Cover and cook until the corn is done, about 2-3 minutes. Drain liquid, then season with salt and pepper.

Place the grains in a large bowl add the Swiss chard mixture, tomatoes, green onions and herbs, and toss to combine. In a small bowl, mix the sherry vinegar and olive oil season with salt and pepper, then toss into the salad. Adjust seasonings you might need more salt and pepper.

Serve immediately, topped with the cheese, if using. You can also keep this for later. Let cool, cover tightly, and refrigerate up to 2 days. Top with cheese when serving.

Per serving: 276 calories, 6 g protein, 40 g carbohydrate, 11 g fat (2 g saturated), 0 mg cholesterol, 123 mg sodium, 6 g fiber.

Wine pairing: Slightly nutty whole grains make a good base for vegetables and cheese, which are nicely accompanied by the 2009 Columbia Crest Winery Two Vines Washington Sauvignon Blanc ($8).

Grilled Lamb Chops With Savory Pluot 'Jam'

This jam also works with grilled pork chops or seared duck breasts.

  • 2 pounds lamb chops, such as rib, arm or shoulder chops
  • -- Oil, as needed, for grilling
  • -- Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion (about 1/2 medium onion)
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely chopped fresh thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 1/2 pound pluots or plums, pitted and cut into wedges
  • 1/8 cup dry red wine
  • 1 tablespoon sugar

Instructions: Season the lamb chops liberally with salt and pepper. Preheat a grill or grill pan to medium-high heat, and lightly grease the grate with oil. When preheated, grill the lamb to desired doneness. Let rest, tented with foil.

Meanwhile, pour the olive oil into a medium-large saute pan over medium heat. Add the onion and saute until tender, about 8 minutes. Add the thyme, rosemary and garlic, and saute for 1 minute. Add the pluots and cook, stirring to coat with the herbs, about 2 minutes. Add the red wine and sugar bring to a simmer and simmer gently until thickened and jammy, about 10 to 12 minutes.

Remove the garlic clove from the sauce, and season the sauce to taste with salt and pepper the sauce will be tart but this will go well with the lamb (and any wine you might serve with it). Serve the chops covered in the sauce.

Per serving: 289 calories, 31 g protein, 12 g carbohydrate, 12 g fat (5 g saturated), 100 mg cholesterol, 90 mg sodium, 1 g fiber.

Wine pairing: Lamb calls for a full-bodied red with tannin, while the pluot jam leads to a fruit-forward wine. It might be time to bring out a Petite Sirah blend like the 2006 Bogle Vineyards California Phantom ($16).


11 Dessert Recipes in 5 Ingredients or Less

Header image: CHOW

It’s summer and the weather is fabulous – who wants to be indoors cooking all day? No worries, with these 5 ingredients or fewer recipes, you will be the toast of the town with just a little more effort than it takes to make toast. Get those taste buds ready, it’s time for some very easy desserts:

1. Broiled Pluots with Zabaglione

This Italian custard is sweet, creamy, and delicious when broiled over halved stone fruit. If you don’t have pluots, try it with nectarines or peaches instead. Get our Broiled Pluots with Zabaglione recipe.

2. Dulce de Leche

A dessert in a can – yes, it’s really that easy. Just roast a can of sweetened condensed milk in a bain marie and wait until it turns golden brown and irresistibly thick and creamy. Eat it on toasted brioche, on cheesecake, or on a spoon. Get our Dulce de Leche recipe.

3. Sweet Panzanella

Okay, this technically has 6 ingredients but it’s way too easy an delicious not to include. Simply mix buttery croutons with sweet berries and sugar, and you have a delicious, light dessert that is perfect for a picnic or brunch. Get our Sweet Panzanella recipe.

4. Peanut Butter Chocolate Fudge

This pan of sweets will be finished before you are done reading this article. This fudge is chocolatey, nutty, and with the help of sweetened condensed milk and mini marshmallows, is a breeze to make. Feel free to mix in your favorite nuts or chocolate cookie pieces for an extra-indulgent dessert. Get our Peanut Butter Chocolate Fudge recipe.

5. Banana Hot Chocolate

Because those summer nights can get a little chilly. This hot chocolate is super decadent with half and half as its base. Blended banana adds a distinctly tropical back note. Feel free to use whatever chocolate you like – just make sure that it’s sweetened, because there is no extra sugar in this recipe. Get our Banana Hot Chocolate recipe.

6. Chocolate Dipped Strawberries

They’re not just for hotel suite upgrades anymore. These are a breeze to make and by following the simple tutorial for making tuxedos on the strawberries, you may ensure that every night is a black tie affair. Get our Chocolate Dipped Strawberries recipe.

7. Meringue Mushrooms

Finally, mushrooms that everyone will love – there’s no fear of fungus here. Egg whites are whipped with sugar and cocoa, then piped into little mushroom shapes before being baked into crunchy, irresistibly sweet cookies. Get our Meringue Mushrooms recipe.

8. Peaches ‘n’ Cream Pops

The sweetest fruit of summer combines with rich mascarpone, cream, and sugar to make the most decadent popsicles on the block. These are creamy and elegant enough to serve at an outdoor summer soiree. Feel free to use other stone fruit in place of peaches if that’s what you have on hand. Get our Peaches ‘n’ Cream Pops recipe.

9. Chocolate Dipped Raspberry Sorbet Bar

All you need for this sweet treat is a pint of raspberry sorbet and some really good chocolate. It’s a process to get the sorbet really frozen before you coat it in several layers of chocolate, but the result is worth it. Plus, it’s made with ingredients that you probably already have at home. Get our Chocolate Dipped Raspberry Sorbet Bar recipe.

10. Mendiants

These miniature bites of chocolate, nuts, and fruit are fancy enough for wedding favors but easy enough to make on a weeknight to bring in for your co-worker’s birthday. If you don’t like pistachios or almonds, experiment with your favorite nuts. Get our Mendiants recipe.

11. Easy Pain au Chocolat

It couldn’t be any easier or more delicious than this. Good quality store bought croissants stuffed with your favorite chocolate hazelnut spread are ideal as breakfast or as dessert when topped with ice cream or whipped cream. Serve it with spiked coffee for a delicious boozy brunch. Get our Easy Pain Au Chocolat recipe.


Raspberry brown sugar gratin

This is the ugliest, best thing I have ever made with three ingredients and the happy ending to three weeks of obsessing. And here you probably just thought it looked like an accident, didn’t you?

This plan hatched last month when Regina Schrambling declared on Epicurious’ Epi-Log that one of the best ways to eat summer berries is to “just add fat” to them. Well, she didn’t have to ask me twice! Buried near the end of the post, however, is the real gem, a summary of a recipe from New American Classics by Jeremiah Tower (I thought his hair looked familiar…) in which berries, sour cream and dark brown sugar are broiled together in a shallow dish to create something he calls a “Russian Gratin.”

I have thought about nothing since. No, I am not being melodramatic, just ask my poor husband, who I informed that, being Russian, it was his destiny to love this. I became single-minded in my plight to make this happen but even that was a challenge that shouldn’t have been a challenge. First, I was saddened to learn that the book was out of print I ordered it used but decided I couldn’t wait until it arrived: I had to make it now now now! Still, it took three trips to the Greenmarket to find raspberries without mold on them. (I prefer them to wait to show signs of rot until five minutes after I get home.) And then, I conveniently forgot one small but pretty salient detail: me and the broiler don’t get along. Chalk it up to the cheapest oven a landlord can get away with buying, but every time I put something under it, the pilot light goes out a minute later. (Oh, delicious gassy brûlée!) I tried to finish it off with a blowtorch, which immediately set the brown sugar on fire (Mm, gassy and smoky!) and then finally I determined that it was as good as it was going to get.

“As good as it was going to get” does not do this dish justice, people. This is crusty, charred, half-cooked heaven in a gratin dish. I’ve never had anything like it but I’m pretty sure that until the end of time, when I have five minutes to throw together a dessert (or possibly even longer, because I’m forgetting any compelling reason to make something else), this is what it will be. Sure, I might deck it out with crème fraîche instead of sour cream, maybe I’ll use different berries or one day have a broiler than actually broils things, but I can assure you that even half-burnt, partially cooked with store-bought inorganic sour cream and berries halfway to the compost bin, this is the best thing to come out of my kitchen and into my belly in weeks.


Raspberry Brown Sugar Gratin (Russian Gratin with Raspberries)

  • Servings: 4 to 6
  • Time: 10 minutes
  • Source:Adapted from Jeremiah Tower's New American Classics via Regina Schrambling

[Updated to add] Ooh, I just had an idea — Swap thick, full-fat Greek-style yogurt swapped for sour cream and serve it at a brunch to what I have to imagine would be a round of applause. Or at least I’d applaud.

  • 1 pint (2 cups) fresh raspberries (or your choice of berry)
  • 1 pint (2 cups) sour cream (or crème fraîche)
  • 1 cup (190 grams) dark brown sugar

Keeping: The leftovers might look like something died in your fridge but I can assure you, are equally delicious.


Port gives this plum dessert added luscious flavor. You'll boil down the wine with allspice and brown sugar before mixing in the plums.

We love elaborate plum desserts, but we really have a soft spot for easy plum recipes like this one, which simply brings together the fruit, pungent blue cheese, and toasty almonds. Any leftover plum vinaigrette is awesome drizzled over pretty much any salad.

Since 1995, Epicurious has been the ultimate food resource for the home cook, with daily kitchen tips, fun cooking videos, and, oh yeah, over 33,000 recipes.

© 2021 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement and Your California Privacy Rights. Epicurious may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices


Pluots And Apriums: The Best Of Both Parents

The crossing of plums and apricots has resulted in dozens of varieties of pluots, like these early queens.

Picking Fruit

Plumcots, pluots and apriums can be eaten out of hand or put into tarts, pies and crisps. They're also tasty in salads. Basically, they can be used in any recipe calling for stone fruit.

Purchase fruit that is plump and firm to the touch. Avoid fruit that is pale or has any bruising or cracks in the skin.

Ripen at room temperature in a closed paper bag until fruit is fragrant and gives to light pressure. Then refrigerate for up to three days in a plastic or paper bag. Bring to room temperature before eating for the fullest flavor.

More On Pluots And Apriums

The sweet, juicy, deep red flesh of the flavorosa pluot. Pat Tanumihardja for NPR hide caption

The sweet, juicy, deep red flesh of the flavorosa pluot.

About The Author

Patricia Tanumihardja writes about food, travel and lifestyle through a multicultural lens — she has lived on three continents and speaks four languages. She manages the Pacific Grove Certified Farmers Market on California's Monterey Peninsula. Her book The Asian Grandmothers Cookbook will be published by Sasquatch Books in October 2009. Please visit her Web site and blog.

One summer not long ago, my nose, discerning the unmistakable fragrance of summer's sweet stone fruit, led me to a canopy-covered market stall. As I inched closer I found, nestled among the everyday plums and apricots, plum imposters in shades of yellow, green and purple, and bright orange apricot look-alikes smudged with a peachy-red blush.

The friendly farmer, Tony Inzana, introduced me to pluots and apriums, complex hybrids of plum and apricot, or, in science-speak, interspecifics. Inzana held out a rosy specimen, rubbing the smooth, purple-black skin of a flavorosa pluot lovingly between his thumb and forefinger. Because a pluot is mostly plum, it looks more like a plum than an apricot. However, its insides are soft and grainy, unlike the firm flesh of a plum. I took one bite, and its floral and candy-sweet flavor exploded in my mouth, and juice dripped all over my fingers.

The aprium, on the other hand, has skin covered with scant fuzz and tastes like a sweeter apricot with a hint of plum.

Inzana grew his first pluots and apriums on his farm, Inzana Ranch, in Hughson, Calif., in 1997. "I had a desire to plant something interesting and . I like to take things that are unusual to sell at the farmers market," he says. Today, he has about 80 pluot trees and 40 aprium trees with zany names like flavorella, flavor grenade, flavor king, flavor queen and flavorich.

Interspecific fruits, however, have a much longer history.

More than a century ago, horticulturalist Luther Burbank bred the plumcot with a 50-50 plum and apricot split. However, it was Floyd Zaiger who revolutionized the fruit and made it widely available.

Zaiger bred the plumcot with a plum to create the pluot — three-fifths plum and two-fifths apricot — and coined the trademarked moniker. While the plumcot is a simple plum and apricot cross, pluots and apriums (70 percent apricot and 30 percent plum) are the result of intricate crossbreeding over several generations.

Before visions of Frankenfruit start taking shape in your mind, let me reassure you that the fruit are crossbred naturally. Zaiger performs no genetic modification and accelerates the natural selection process through hand pollination.

"We're like bees in nature," says Leith Gardner, Zaiger's daughter. "We take the pollen from one selection of fruit and combine it with another."

Unlike bees that flit from flower to flower in a matter of minutes, developing each hybrid takes 12 to 15 years, Gardner says. The final fruit adopts the absolute best qualities from the plum and the apricot. With a higher sugar content than that of a plum or an apricot alone, both the pluot and the aprium are known for their sweetness and intense flavor.

More than 20 varieties of pluots have been developed by Zaiger Genetics, and more are being developed each season. Each variety comprises a different percentage of plum and apricot genes resulting in fruit of myriad physical attributes: Their skins can be saturated in golden yellow or pale green speckled with magenta, and their flesh range in color from creamy white to blood red.

Half a dozen aprium varieties are currently on the market, all with bright orange skins and flesh. A white-fleshed aprium will soon be distributed commercially.

Demand for these hybrid fruits, especially pluots, has skyrocketed. Pluots now make up a majority of the plum market. In fact, you might be eating a pluot or an aprium and not even know it. "Some stores don't want to label them [correctly] because they don't want to create another space for a fruit that looks similar, or that customers aren't familiar with," Gardner says.

Grown predominantly in Washington and California, pluots are widely distributed in Idaho, Oregon, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, and increasingly in parts of the Midwest and on the East Coast as varieties suited to these climates are developed. Apriums are a little harder to grow outside the Northwest and California.

Depending on your location, pluots and apriums are available May through October at specialty food stores, online and, of course, at the farmers market.


End of Summer Recipes

Make good use of all the last of summer’s precious produce.

Crispy Corn Fritters

When corn is new, we want to eat it straight from the cob, as fresh and unadorned as possible. As the season lumbers to an end, though, we’re looking for new ways to eat it—and, frankly, for ways that take advantage of the starchiness and diminished sugar of late summer corn—like this delicious fritter recipe. Get our Crispy Corn Fritters recipe.

Kuhn Rikon Stainless Steel Corn Zipper, $18 from Amazon

Less messy than cutting off the kernels with a knife (allegedly).

Cherry Tomato Tart with Anchovies and Garlic Confit

The last of the candy-sweet summer cherry tomatoes are great piled onto a free-form tart with soft, mellow garlic confit and briny anchovies (though if you must, you can skip the fish). Get the Cherry Tomato Tart with Anchovies and Garlic Confit recipe.

Watermelon Gazpacho with Pickled Watermelon Rind

When it’s still warm enough to enjoy cold soup, make this no-waste gazpacho that combines two summer icons: watermelon and tomatoes, plus fall fave fennel, among a few other ingredients. It’s fast, easy, and delicious, and the pickled watermelon rind garnish isn’t just a clever, tasty way to reduce food waste, it’s a great trick for preserving a little bit of summer into fall. Get the Watermelon Gazpacho with Pickled Watermelon Rind recipe.

Roasted Red Pepper Tart

Though they might come from greenhouses 9 months of the year, peppers come into their own after mid-summer. By late summer, just as fall is massing at the gates, local sweet peppers are at their peak. This elegant tart takes beautiful advantage of that and pairs them with salty feta and creamy ricotta cheese. Get our Roasted Red Pepper Tart recipe.

Blueberry Spice Coffee Cake

Fresh blueberries are one of the tastes of summer for us. Sprinkled through fruit salads, whizzed up in yogurt smoothies, even sauced for pancakes and waffles. Here, fresh, juicy berries turn the clichéd blueberry pastry into a thing, we realize, is best kept seasonal. Get our Blueberry Spice Coffee Cake recipe.

Shaved Fennel and Strawberry Salad

Fennel and berries don’t seem to have much to say to one another, especially in the same dish. This salad proves that assumption wrong. Late-summer strawberries, usually softer and riper than at other times during the summer, find a juicy purpose with refreshing, crisp fennel. Get our Shaved Fennel and Strawberry Salad recipe.

Sautéed Zucchini

The thing we love about eating zucchini at the end of summer, despite the fact of using up the prodigious yield from our gardens, is there’s such an easygoing variety for the slipping into shopping bags: green, golden, striated—it’s a variable bounty. Get our Sautéed Zucchini recipe.

Broiled Pluots with Zabaglione

Pluots are one of botany’s great late-summer life enhancements—we love their variety, the sweetness and acidity, the slight blush of bitterness. This simple recipe weds delicious fruit with sweet, luxuriously textured sauce, and take the extra step of slipping both beneath the broiler. Get our Broiled Pluots with Zabaglione recipe.


End of Summer Recipes

Crispy Corn Fritters

When corn is new, we want to eat it straight from the cob, as fresh and unadorned as possible. As the season lumbers to an end, though, we’re looking for new ways to eat it—and, frankly, for ways that take advantage of the starchiness and diminished sugar of late summer corn—like this delicious fritter recipe. Get our Crispy Corn Fritters recipe.

Kuhn Rikon Stainless Steel Corn Zipper, $12 on Amazon

Less messy than cutting off the kernels with a knife (allegedly).

Cherry Tomato Tart with Anchovies and Garlic Confit

The last of the candy-sweet summer cherry tomatoes are great piled onto a free-form tart with soft, mellow garlic confit and briny anchovies (though if you must, you can skip the fish). Get the Cherry Tomato Tart with Anchovies and Garlic Confit recipe.

Roasted Red Pepper Tart

Though they might come from greenhouses 9 months of the year, peppers come into their own after mid-summer. By late summer, just as fall is massing at the gates, local sweet peppers are at their peak. This elegant tart takes beautiful advantage of that and pairs them with salty feta and creamy ricotta cheese. Get our Roasted Red Pepper Tart recipe.

Blueberry Spice Coffee Cake

Fresh blueberries are one of the tastes of summer for us. Sprinkled through fruit salads, whizzed up in yogurt smoothies, even sauced for pancakes and waffles. Here, fresh, juicy berries turn the clichéd blueberry pastry into a thing, we realize, is best kept seasonal. Get our Blueberry Spice Coffee Cake recipe.

Shaved Fennel and Strawberry Salad

Fennel and berries don’t seem to have much to say to one another, especially in the same dish. This salad proves that assumption wrong. Late-summer strawberries, usually softer and riper than at other times during the summer, find a juicy purpose with refreshing, crisp fennel. Get our Shaved Fennel and Strawberry Salad recipe.

Sautéed Zucchini

The thing we love about eating zucchini at the end of summer, despite the fact of using up the prodigious yield from our gardens, is there’s such an easygoing variety for the slipping into shopping bags: green, golden, striated—it’s a variable bounty. Get our Sautéed Zucchini recipe.

Broiled Pluots with Zabaglione

Pluots are one of botany’s great late-summer life enhancements—we love their variety, the sweetness and acidity, the slight blush of bitterness. This simple recipe weds delicious fruit with sweet, luxuriously textured sauce, and take the extra step of slipping both beneath the broiler. Get our Broiled Pluots with Zabaglione recipe.


Five ways to enjoy pluots

It’s a plum. It’s an apricot. It’s one great summer fruit. |Linda Lau Anusasananan, Sunset.com

1. Grilled: Cut pluots in half and brush with equal parts honey and Dijon mustard. Grill until browned on both sides. While you’re at it, grill pork or lamb chops to serve with the pluots. Recipe: Grilled Pluots

2. Glazed: Halve and pit pluots and put, cut side up, in a pie pan. Spoon apricot jam or orange marmalade generously over the top and broil until bubbly and browned. Serve over plain yogurt sweetened with jam or marmalade. Sprinkle with granola. Recipe: Glazed Pluots

3. Brûléed: Spread sliced or bite-size chunks of pluots in a shallow baking dish and sprinkle with brown sugar. Broil until bubbly and browned. Serve hot with vanilla ice cream or sour cream. Recipe: Brûléed Pluots

4. In salsa: Use chopped pluots instead of tomatoes in fresh salsa mix with lime juice and chopped chiles, onion, and cilantro. Great on grilled meats of all kinds. Recipe: Pluots Salsa

5. In salad: Add sliced pluots and crumbled blue or feta cheese to baby greens. Dress with a balsamic vinaigrette. Recipe: Plouts Salad