Traditional recipes

Best Merguez Recipes

Best Merguez Recipes

Top Rated Merguez Recipes

Whether you're entertaining two or 10 around the holidays, it's hard to beat a frittata when it comes to serving up a hearty and healthy breakfast.Akin to a large, flat (i.e. unrolled) omelette, frittatas are the perfect brunch item, in my book. It's a vehicle for all sorts of toppings, here salty and spicy merguez sausage, rich green winter kale, chunks of roasted sweet potato, and delicate caramelized onions. All of the ingredients can be prepped in advance, so all you need to do is mix the eggs and add the ingredients about 20 minutes before you want to eat.This recipe serves two, but it can be easily doubled or tripled to feed your group. Just use a larger sauté pan and be sure to cook the frittata until the center is just set — it will certainly take longer in the oven. Serve with toasted slices of hearty farm bread, fresh butter, and jam.Click here to see Lazy Sunday Brunch Recipes.


Recipe Summary

  • 4 pounds boneless lamb shoulder, cut into 3-by-1-inch strips
  • 1 pound lamb or pork fat, cut into 2-by-1-inch strips
  • 4 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon hot paprika
  • 2 teaspoons ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons ground coriander
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon red wine vinegar, chilled
  • 3 tablespoons cold water
  • 1/4 cup harissa
  • 15 to 18 feet (about 1/2 ounce) salted pork or sheep casings

Spread the meat and fat strips on 2 large rimmed baking sheets. In a small bowl, combine the garlic, dry seasonings and spices and sprinkle the seasoning mixture all over the meat and fat. Refrigerate the meat and fat for 15 minutes. Drizzle the liquid ingredients all over the meat and fat. Freeze the seasoned meat and fat until very firm, about 45 minutes.

Chill the bowl of a stand mixer and the meat grinder's parts in the freezer. Set up the grinder with the coarse grinding plate place the bowl below. With the machine at medium-high speed, gradually drop in the meat and fat. Add any liquid on the baking sheets to the ground meat.

Put the ground meat in the freezer again to keep it at 32° to 40° (at 45°, the fat begins to melt, ruining the texture of the sausage). Using clean hands or the paddle of the stand mixer, knead or beat the meat until a sticky mass forms, about 50 seconds be careful not to let the meat get too warm. Refrigerate for up to 3 hours.

Meanwhile, soak the pork or sheep casings in warm water for 30 minutes. Drain the casings. Working over the sink, gently run warm water through each casing. Pinch both ends and lift up the water-filled casing. Look for any spots that leak and cut out those portions.

Place the sausage stuffer in the freezer for 15 minutes. Set up the sausage stuffer and slip all but 6 inches of a casing onto the tube, leaving the trailing end untied. Tightly pack the sausage mixture into the canister. Start cranking the sausage stuffer very slowly until the meat emerges from the tube. Now tie a knot at the trailing end of the casing. Slowly crank the sausage into the casing, using your free hand to regulate how tightly the sausage is packed make sure not to overstuff the casing. When the casing is nearly stuffed, tie off the end.

Starting at one end, pinch off the first link by pinching your fingers around the sausage to separate the filling 6 inches is a good average length. Then, roll the link toward you 3 to 5 times, creating a twist in the casing. Move down to form the next link, rolling 3 to 5 times in the opposite direction (this prevents unraveling). If the casing splits, remove the stuffing near the split and tie the casing closed before proceeding. Alternately, the links can be formed by sectioning them off with butcher's twine. Repeat with the remaining casings and sausage.

Hang the sausages on wooden or metal racks over 2 rimmed baking sheets, making sure not to crowd them so that air can circulate around them. Sterilize a needle over a flame. Prick holes all over the sausages with the needle, especially where there are air pockets. Let the sausages hang to dry for 1 to 2 hours, then wrap in butcher's paper and refrigerate overnight before cooking.


The Great Ojja versus Shakshuka Mystery

I’ve already shared my love affair with Shakshuka (I have a recipe for it here in fact). What is it? It’s baked eggs (or if you stay on the stovetop, poached eggs) in a spicy, garlicky, tomatoey, peppery sauce. It’s often touted as a famous Israeli breakfast, but that’s not quite true because shakshuka is originally from Tunisia. It made its way to Israel via Sephardic Jews migrating from Tunisia to Israel. It’s easy to see why the Israelis adopted it. It’s delicious!

Tunisian Ojja. What is it? It’s baked eggs (or if you stay on the stovetop, poached eggs) in a spicy, garlicky, tomatoey, peppery sauce. But wait? Isn’t that shakshuka? Yes. Yes it is. So then Ojja is Shakshuka then? Um… Yes? Yes. It is. I think…

So then why 1) a different name and 2) a different recipe? Well, because 1) I don’t know! And 2) I’ll get to that in a moment!

In her book The New Mediterranean Jewish Table: Old World Recipes for the Modern Home , author Joyce Goldstein suggests that the difference between ojja and shakshuka is that in ojja the eggs are stirred into the tomato and pepper sauce mixture whereas in shakshuka they’re sort of poached whole on the surface. That would make ojja similar to a Turkish dish called Menemen , by the way. She’s not the only person to clear up the confusion in this way, by the way. Confusion resolved, right? I certainly thought so. But there’s still a problem.

Rim and Munya, two cousins who were born in Tunisia and now live in Seattle, and who are responsible for the excellent food blog Our Tunisian Table , make the ojja/shakshuka distinction differently.

Rim and Munya insist that eggs poached in spicy tomato sauce is actually ojja. Shakshuka, by contrast, usually has potato(!) in it and doesn’t always have eggs. The name shakshuka, they argue, has somehow over time and various cultural mutations come to be used for both dishes. That would make the breakfast dish that’s famous in Israel ojja by the way. And as for the stir the eggs in or let them poach whole question? It can be done either way. Both are still ojja (which is confused for shakshuka).

Are Rim and Munya right about this? I’m really in no position to say. I can tell you that I’ve never had shakshuka with potatoes, or for that matter without eggs. But then again, that may just mean I’ve only ever had ojja mistakenly called shakshuka. And Rim and Munya are from Tunisia and I am not. So I’m inclined to trust them on this.

But wait, it gets even more confusing! It’s common to have ojja with merguez (which is a spicy, garlic and harissa-spiked sausage), or to have ojja with eggs, or to have ojja with merguez and eggs ! POW!

But wait, there’s more! There is also a deluxe version of ojja made with…wait for it…seafood! And presumably no merguez and/or eggs! POW! Even more variables to contend with.

Anyway, I’ve given up on seeking clarity the matter for now. I’m comfortable with the mystery. I’m just a guy in Portland who likes to cook. And today I’m making Ojja Merguez ! That’s eggs and sausage in a spicy, garlicky, tomato and pepper sauce. You might know it as shakshuka with sausage in it. Hey, that’s cool with me too.


These 15 Tunisian Recipes Will Add Big, Bold Flavors to Your Mediterranean Diet

Thanks to their close proximity to the Mediterranean Sea, nations in the Middle East, Southern Europe, and North Africa share many culinary themes. But while they include overlapping dishes, the cuisines of these countries also inhabit their own unique spaces. The North African nation of Tunisia features a food tradition that will seem largely familiar to fans of Mediterranean fare, but the Tunisian affinity for bold spices and powerful heat quotients gives this country's cuisine a personality all its own. If you're a fan of the Mediterranean diet, you''ll love these delicious, top-rated Tunisian recipes.


Recipe Summary

  • 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 medium red onions, sliced 1/4 inch thick
  • Salt
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • Freshly ground pepper
  • Four 6-ounce merguez or fresh chorizo sausages, pricked all over with a fork
  • Four 6-inch pieces of baguette, split and toasted
  • 12 large cilantro sprigs
  • 4 lemon wedges, for serving

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil. Add the onions, season with salt and cook over moderately high heat, stirring, for 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to moderate and cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are softened, about 10 minutes. Stir in the honey and balsamic vinegar and cook over low heat, stirring occasionally, until richly caramelized, about 10 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

Light a grill. Grill the sausages over moderate heat, turning occasionally, until nicely charred and cooked through, about 15 minutes.

Set a sausage in each piece of baguette. Top with the caramelized onions and a few cilantro sprigs and close the sandwiches. Transfer to plates and serve. Garnish with the lemon wedges.


Merguez kebabs

Use this mix to make these kebabs, or as sausagemeat. These quantities will give you just the right amount for today’s potato bake dish, but more than you need for the scotch eggs any you don’t use can be frozen or fried up for a smaller batch of these kebabs. Makes eight, to serve four (or 650g raw sausagemeat).

500g minced lamb (20% fat)
2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
2 tbsp rose harissa
1 tsp cumin seeds, toasted and lightly crushed
2 tsp coriander seeds, toasted and lightly crushed
2 tsp fennel seeds, toasted and lightly crushed
1 tsp sweet smoked paprika
¼ tsp cayenne
½ tsp ground cinnamon
2 tbsp olive oil
80g fresh white breadcrumbs
Salt

Put everything in a large bowl with a teaspoon of salt. Using your hands, mix to combine, then form into eight kebabs about 12cm long x 4cm wide x 2cm thick. Set aside in the fridge for 30 minutes, to rest and for the flavours to develop.

Heat the oven to 200C/390F/gas mark 6. Put a frying pan on a medium-high heat and ventilate the kitchen. Once the pan is hot, fry the kebabs for two to three minutes, turning halfway through, until golden brown all over. Transfer to a small tray, tip off any excess oil and bake for 10 minutes, until cooked through. Serve with a tomato and cucumber salad and some pitta.


The Meatwave

There can't be a bad Meatwave&mdashas long as I'm with my friend and grilling, I'm happy&mdashbut some certainly stand out as true achievements. One of those was last summer's Meatroccan Nights, where I decided to do an entirely Moroccan-themed menu that spanned eight different recipes. I tend to overdue the amount of recipes I tackle each time I have an audience, but that's part of the game, especially considering they won't all be winners. On that day last June though, each thing I pulled off the grill just seemed better than the last, and by the end of the day I remember feeling very accomplished and proud of what had just transpired. So to relive one of my prouder grilling moments, I'm dedicating the entire month of July to the Moroccan-influenced recipes from that day, beginning with the one that sparked the idea in the first place&mdashmerguez.

Next to tagines, merguez is one of the first things I think of when anyone mentions Moroccan cuisine. These little sausages are crazy delicious with their spicy and earthy flavor against rich and juicy lamb. A good merguez sandwich is my go-to when I'm doing quicker Moroccan meals, and it rarely disappoints.

Merguez was consistently on my to-do list, but one detail always gave me pause when considering tackling it&mdashsheep casings. Yes, to get those small links, sheep casings, instead of the larger hog casings, must be used. Other sausage makers I've talked to have lamented working with these delicate casing that are prone to bursting, and because of that, I just assumed I didn't want to even go through that frustration. But it was finally time to face my fear and give into my strong desire to make merguez.

As I emptied the large quantity of sheep casings into a bowl for soaking, I thought I had made a huge mistake. A fecal aroma filled my kitchen and seemed like it permeated in ever nook and cranny of my house at first. Sure, hog casings don't smell great, but they aren't rank like these were. After an initial shock at the odor, I composed myself and carried on.

I hoped that the meat and spices I was going to be working with would overtake that stench, and while it never did, my stomach started correcting itself as I began putting together the seasonings for the merguez. These started with whole cumin, coriander, and fennel that was toasted and ground. Those potent spices were then mixed with paprika and cayenne and set aside.

I then moved onto the meat portion, unfolding a beautiful leg of lamb that I cubed, removing any sinew and silver skin as I went. I added in a pound of cubed fat back, and then tossed all the meat with the spice mixture along with garlic and harissa&mdasha North African hot chili paste.

I've become accustomed to seasoning the meat before grinding, but I'm not quite sure why. I think it may date back to these chicken sausages with basil and tomatoes, where basil and sun dried tomatoes were added before processing to make use of the grinder to further break down those ingredients. It's a habit I should break, because grinding with the spices tends to just be messier and there's likely little to no advantage&mdashI haven't tested this theory yet, but I'm pretty sure it's true.

Really, the spices are probably best added after grinding and before mixing. I take my sausages for a spin in my KitchenAid along with a little liquid to form an loose emulsion and create a more cohesive, finer texture. Since the meat gets well incorporated in this stage, the spices and seasoning would distribute nicely throughout the meat here.

With the meat done and confirmed delicious after cooking and eating a little merguez patty, I was feeling good. That high was about to go downhill as I moved on to stuffing.

By this point, I had become accustomed to the off smell of the casings, but as soon as I started handling them, I suffered a relapse of that initial unpleasantness I experienced. That, with the combination that they were difficult to get on the horn, already made me a bit agitated.

Then the expletives started to fly as my fear was confirmed and the casings kept bursting in quick succession. This meant more tedious work of loading up the casings, and more dealing with that odor.

After a while though, I seemed to be getting the hang of it. I slightly under stuffed the sausages to help prevent bursting, and by the end, I can say things went smoothly, more or less. Once the last of the meat was safely encased, I was only too happy to salt those stinky casings and get them back in the fridge.

At the grill, I was faced with yet another test of my will. As I put these little merguezs over direct heat, they quickly went up in flames. My heart sank as I wondered if all the torture I put myself through up to this point was fading in a blaze of glory, but alas, I had a two-zone fire and was able to safely move these links to the cool side of the grill and roast them until done.

One taste of a finished link and all struggle that came before was quickly forgotten&mdashthe merguez was awesome! The links had the unique earthy heat that defines them, along with the full flavor of lamb that stayed juicy despite the fact that I had almost scorched them to death. The links were a great start to what was going to become a better day whose best part was that beauty of a sandwich above, but that's a story for next week.

Published on Tue Jul 1, 2014 by Joshua Bousel

Merguez

  • Yield 4 pounds
  • Prep 1 Hour 20 Minutes
  • Cook 10 Minutes
  • Total 1 Hour 30 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons whole cumin seed
  • 2 teaspoons whole coriander seed
  • 2 teaspoons whole fennel seed
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 2 tablespoons Kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 3 pounds lamb shoulder, cut into 3/4-inch cubes and removed of gristle
  • 1 pound lamb, beef, or pork fat, cut into 3/4-inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons freshly minced garlic (about 6 medium cloves)
  • 1/3 cup harissa
  • 1/3 cup ice water
  • Lamb casings, soaked in warm water for 30 minutes prior to use

Procedure

  1. Place cumin, coriander, and fennel seeds in a cast iron skillet over medium heat and toast until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a spice grinder and grind into a fine powder. Transfer spice mixture to a small bowl and mix in paprika, salt, and cayenne.
  2. Place lamb and fat in a large bowl. Add in spice mixture, garlic, and harissa. Toss to through coat meat and fat in spices. Place in refrigerator until ready to grind.
  3. Grind mixture through a meat grinder, fitted with small die, into a bowl set in ice.
  4. Using paddle attachment of a standing mixer, mix on low speed for 1 minute. Add in water and mix until liquid is incorporated and sausage is uniform and sticky, about 1 minute more.
  5. Form a small sausage patty place rest of sausage mixture in refrigerator. Cook patty in a small frying pan over medium-high heat until cooked through. Taste and adjust seasonings of sausage if necessary.
  6. Stuff sausage into lambs casings and twist into 6-inch links. Refrigerate until ready to cook.
  7. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and spread the coals evenly over entire surface of coal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Grill over medium-high direct heat until sausage registers 155°F when an instant read thermometer is inserted in middle of link. Remove from grill, let rest for 5 minutes, and serve.

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Comments

David Somerville Beautiful sausages!

I have never worked with lamb casings. not looking forward to fecal aromas. think I'll stick with hogs! Posted Tue, Jul 1 2014 9:21PM

BK All Day awesome! if merguez is ever on the menu anywhere i can't not order it. may have to breakout the kitchenaide mixer (wedding present that is still in the box). Posted Fri, Jul 4 2014 1:23AM

Mike Baylus So I made these this morning, and wow! What a juicy, flavorful sausage! I've been making sausages for some time, but have somehow skipped these babies. They'll be in my regular rotation from now on. I ended up using pork fat, as there wasn't enough extra fat on the shoulder chops to use. Also, I couldn't find jarred harissa easily, so I made my own. Pretty easy. Thanks for this recipe! Posted Fri, Aug 28 2015 1:25PM


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Snack stick recipe.

I like this one. Adjust garlic and heat to your pref. Maybe some white pepper if you want the after glow.

Start cooker at a low temp and gradually increase til you hit 170F.

Sticks are done at 154F IT.

Ice water bath and hang to dry.

I just made this as summer sausage in 2-1/2" x 18" casings, but it should work great as a stick.

These were made with 5# ground whole sirloin tip and 1# pork butt. (Double batch)

SummerSausage04Small.jpg

1 cup cold Buttermilk
1-1/2 tablespoons Morton Tender Quick
2 teaspoons mustard seed
1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon coarse ground black pepper (butcher grind)
2 teaspoons liquid smoke flavoring (optional)
3 pounds lean ground venison or (90/10 ground beef)
1 cup coarsely shredded Sharp Cheddar Cheese or (Hi-Temp cubes)
2 tsp Chipotle Powder (or to taste)

Driedstick

Smoking Guru

I just did some Lem pepper sticks last weekend they were great tasting with a little heat on the end. they are on sale on lems web site

Woodcutter

Master of the Pit

1 lb of ground pork butt

Mix, stuff in sheep casings and smoke to an IT of 155.

I tried to make ham sticks like Nueske's or Maplewood Meats and came up with this recipe from a canadian bacon recipe.

I would substitute the Tender Quick with the correct amount of cure#1 and add salt separately. These sticks turned out really good from this recipe just a little salty for me. (good with beer).

DSCN7357.JPG

DSCN7354.JPG

Big casino

Master of the Pit

1tsp coarse ground black pepper - add more if you like pepper taste

2tsp white ground pepper - substitute with black pepper if you dont have this

1tsp onion powder - more or less to taste

1tsp garlic powder - more or less to taste

If you like it hot add the following

2TBS ground cayenne pepper - more or less to taste

mix all spices and cure#1 into 1 cup of ice cold water mix into ground beef until mixed through

stuff into casing, hang at room temp until casings are dry, approx 1 to 2 hrs,

place into smoker preheated to around 130 degrees for one hour to dry casings, then add smoke for 1hr or until desired color, then raise heat to 150 for one hr then raise heat to 180 until an internal temp of 152 to 160 degrees,

place into ice cold water until IT drops below 90, if you want you can then spray the sticks with hot water to remove any grease on the casings, then rinse in cold water again then bloom sticks at room temperature until casings are dry or desired color is obtained then refrigerate in a brown paper bag

Debbie easton

Newbie

Fished

Smoking Fanatic

Reinhard

Master of the Pit

Debbie easton

Newbie

Big casino

Master of the Pit

Hoity toit

Master of the Pit

Hoity toit

Master of the Pit

Big casino

Master of the Pit

I leave the mustard seed whole, but you could crush them if you want to, I just like the look of those little yellow seeds in my sausage. LOL

I have heard of guys toasting them too but I have yet to do that. probably the next batch I make

Hoity toit

Master of the Pit

I leave the mustard seed whole, but you could crush them if you want to, I just like the look of those little yellow seeds in my sausage. LOL

I have heard of guys toasting them too but I have yet to do that. probably the next batch I make

Grouse

Fire Starter

1tsp coarse ground black pepper - add more if you like pepper taste

2tsp white ground pepper - substitute with black pepper if you dont have this

1tsp onion powder - more or less to taste

1tsp garlic powder - more or less to taste

If you like it hot add the following

2TBS ground cayenne pepper - more or less to taste

mix all spices and cure#1 into 1 cup of ice cold water mix into ground beef until mixed through

stuff into casing, hang at room temp until casings are dry, approx 1 to 2 hrs,

place into smoker preheated to around 130 degrees for one hour to dry casings, then add smoke for 1hr or until desired color, then raise heat to 150 for one hr then raise heat to 180 until an internal temp of 152 to 160 degrees,

place into ice cold water until IT drops below 90, if you want you can then spray the sticks with hot water to remove any grease on the casings, then rinse in cold water again then bloom sticks at room temperature until casings are dry or desired color is obtained then refrigerate in a brown paper bag


Why Student Debt Is a Racial Justice Issue

Student loan debt burdens more than 44 million Americans, and prevents millions from buying homes, starting businesses, saving for retirement, or even starting families. This debt is disproportionately affecting Black families, and Black women in particular.

Higher education has long been held as a critical gateway to getting a job and achieving economic stability and mobility. But because of long-standing systemic racial discrimination, Black families have far less wealth to draw on to pay for college, creating barriers for Black communities to access higher education and build wealth. Black families are more likely to borrow, to borrow more, and to have trouble in repayment. Two decades after taking out their student loans, the median Black borrower still owes 95 percent of their debt, whereas the median white borrower has paid off 94 percent of their debt.

Students of color pursue higher education in a social and economic system built on racist ideologies that is set up to work against them and perpetuate racial wealth and income and achievement gaps. To redress this systemic inequality, the ACLU, Center for Responsible Lending (CRL), and more than 300 other organizations are calling on the Biden-Harris administration and Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona to use their authority under the Higher Education Act to cancel $50,000 of student debt per borrower, and Congress must act as well.

To understand the systemic issues rooted in the student debt crisis, we must start with its history. Though we have normalized the idea that students must take on debt for college, historically students benefited from broad public investment in higher education. However, not all students benefited equally: Black students had little access to GI Bill benefits and, even a decade after Brown v. Board of Education (1954), predominately white institutions (PWIs) in many states resisted integration and equal treatment. Further, state and federal governments continued to inadequately and inequitably fund historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) despite the high-quality opportunities they provided and the critical function they performed for Black students and communities. This created and cemented the racial wealth and resource gap in institutions of higher education.

It was in this context that Congress and President Lyndon B. Johnson passed the Higher Education Act of 1965. Recognizing the value of broad higher education access, Johnson hoped the legislation would open the doors of opportunity to everyone, especially Black students and other students of color, through Pell Grants and other subsidies.

To join our Systemic Equality agenda to take action on racial justice, click here.

Yet by the end of the 20th century, just as Black and Brown students and women gained entry after decades-long legal battles and social struggles, reactionary policymakers shifted the significant costs of higher education from the public to individual families. What had been considered a public good when it was predominantly for white men, became a public burden to be shifted to families.

This shift away from public financing, which accelerated after the Great Recession, led to predictable and damaging results: Today the cost of higher education is beyond imagination. It is out of reach for most families, especially Black and Brown students, unless they agree to unsustainable debt. In effect, we are perpetuating the ugly legacy of redlining and housing discrimination by requiring the same Black families that were historically denied wealth to take on a greater debt burden than their white peers.

The student debt crisis is just one of the latest iterations in the long and shameful history of too many unkept promises to Black and Brown communities. This country didn't keep its promise to give formerly enslaved people the land that they worked on to build wealth following the Civil War. Then from redlining, inaccessible GI benefits, and now the decreased value of college degrees, Black people have continuously had the roads to economic success blocked outright.

Canceling $50,000 in student debt can help secure financial stability and economic mobility for Black and Brown borrowers who are disproportionately burdened by this student debt crisis and the impacts of the racial wealth gap in this country. But even after graduation, Black and Latinx people face substantial job discrimination and earn far less than their white counterparts. This income gap makes building financial stability and managing student loan repayment even harder. A college education actually deepens the wealth gap due to the high costs and structural issues in our system. Yet, higher education is a necessity, not a luxury, for today's workforce.

Due to these persisting inequalities, even with $50,000 cancelation per borrower, there will still be millions of borrowers with debt. That number will only grow unless we overhaul loan repayment altogether and create a debt-free college system. The Center for Responsible Learning argues that the federal government should improve repayment by: (1) clearing the books of bad debts, such as debts that have been in repayment for longer than 15 years (2) restoring limitations on collections and making student debt dischargeable in bankruptcy and (3) making repayment truly affordable and budget-conscious through a new income-driven repayment plan open to all borrowers. For new students, a new social contract could also double the Pell Grant and increase funding and support for HBCUs.

We have an opportunity to help millions of families realize their American Dreams, secure financial stability and economic mobility for Black and Brown families, and take a critical step toward closing the racial wealth gap. The charge is clear, the moment is here, and the time for action is now: The Biden administration must cancel $50,000 in student debt per borrower.