Traditional recipes

Poached Cod with Tomato and Saffron

Poached Cod with Tomato and Saffron

For this cod recipe, you want to cook it at a lazy simmer; it will make all the difference between buttery, flaky fish and rubbery, tough fillets.

Ingredients

  • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon Aleppo pepper or ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 1 14.5-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes, drained
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 5-ounce skinless cod fillets

Recipe Preparation

  • Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and Aleppo pepper and cook, stirring often, until fragrant (garlic should not take on any color), about 3 minutes.

  • Add tomatoes, crushing with your hands as you add them, wine, bay leaves, saffron, and ½ cup water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until flavors meld, 5–7 minutes; season with salt and pepper.

  • Reduce heat to medium-low; season cod with salt and pepper and place in skillet. Cover and cook at a bare simmer until cod is opaque throughout and beginning to flake, 5–7 minutes (thicker pieces will take longer to cook).

  • Gently transfer cod to shallow bowls and spoon poaching liquid over.

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 220 Fat (g) 8 Saturated Fat (g) 1 Cholesterol (mg) 60 Carbohydrates (g) 8 Dietary Fiber (g) 2 Total Sugars (g) 4 Protein (g) 27 Sodium (mg) 470Reviews SectionA really lovely and simple way to cook a fish! I only made a quarter of it because I only needed a small amount of fish. I also added some shallots in the beginning and didn’t have any saffron. Seems like a forgiving and flexible recipe. It was so easy and was really tasty! I have a big bag of frozen cod in the fridge and this is my plan for the rest of it!

Poached Cod with Fennel, Tomatoes, and Olives

We are so into cod lately so when I came up with the recipe for this poached cod with fennel, tomatoes, and olives &mdash I knew it was going to be spectacular.

The light, tender, flakey fish is so versatile to work with especially when it&rsquos poached in a delicious broth bursting with flavour.

One of my favourite things about cooking is that you can take a very bland and basic item and turn it into something extraordinary.

I&rsquom starting to like layering flavours to create a more depth of flavour in a dish!

I don&rsquot typically like ordering seafood at restaurants because I feel like they don&rsquot give you nearly enough of a portion.

It makes sense because they need to make margins and profit but it&rsquos always so dissatisfying to me so I tend to try to stick to other proteins.

Now, when it comes to making seafood at home, I am very generous with portions! Haha

Lately I&rsquom really into cod, too, because it&rsquos lean protein. There is hardly any fat on it and you get great source of protein and other nutrients along with it.


Preparation

Step 1

Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and Aleppo pepper and cook, stirring often, until fragrant (garlic should not take on any color), about 3 minutes.
Add tomatoes, crushing with your hands as you add them, wine, bay leaves, saffron, and 1/2 cup water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until flavors meld, 5-7 minutes season with salt and pepper.
Reduce heat to medium-low season cod with salt and pepper and place in skillet. Cover and cook at a bare simmer until cod is opaque throughout and beginning to flake, 5-7 minutes (thicker pieces will take longer to cook).
Gently transfer cod to shallow bowls and spoon poaching liquid over.

You want to cook the cod at a lazy simmer it will make all the difference between buttery, flaky fish and rubbery, tough fillets.


Poached Cod in Tomato Broth

Start to Finish: 20 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound wild-caught cod fillet, cut into 3-inch squares
  • One 28-ounce can organic whole peeled tomatoes (BPA-free), drained
  • 1.5 cups pastured chicken stock
  • Small pinch of saffron (about 15 threads)
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 tablespoons avocado oil
  • Sea salt to taste

Instructions:

  1. In a frying pan set to medium heat, add oil. Using your hands, crush the peeled tomatoes into the pan. Add stock, saffron, bay leaves, and salt to taste.
  2. Bring broth to a simmer over medium heat, then reduce heat to low.
  3. Add cod fillets and cover, simmering for 5-7 minutes or just until fish begins to flake.
  4. Serve fish with tomato broth.

Makes: Serves 2

Nutritional Information (Per Serving):

  • Calories: 167
  • Fat: 10.3g
  • Saturated Fat: 1g
  • Cholesterol: 35mg
  • Salt: 100mg
  • Carbs: 1.6g
  • Dietary Fiber: 0.4g
  • Sugar: 0g
  • Sugar Alcohols: 0g
  • Net Carbs: 1.2g
  • Protein: 18g
  • Calcium: 7mg
  • Potassium: 65mg

Note on ingredients: Tomatoes are in the nightshade family and can cause inflammation in sensitive people. See how you feel after consuming nightshades and avoid them as needed.


Poached Cod with Tomato and Saffron

I fell in love with this dish when I first saw it published in Bon Appetit a couple years ago. In fact, I found the photo of the dish so striking that I cut it from the magazine and pinned it to the bulletin board in my kitchen, along with a handful of other drool-worthy food shots to act as a small art installation decorating the space while my home was staged for sale. For the LONG 2 + years it took me to sell the house I looked longingly at the shot of this dish everyday, but for some damned reason never got around to cooking it until a few weeks ago. Such a shame, because this dish is so flavorful, and SO easy that I’m sure it’ll become a regular in my dinner rotation.

I love cooking fish this way, especially delicate fish like cod that tends to flake and fall apart if not handled with care. The gentle poaching not only ensures the fish stays moist and tender, but also infuses the cooking liquid with tremendous flavor. I’m generally not a huge proponent of saffron, but here it adds a lovely complexity to the broth and plays very nicely with the Aleppo. I tossed in a few left-over spears of asparagus to warm through late in cooking for truly satisfying, but light, one-pot meal. Make sure you have a crusty, artisanal loaf on hand to sop up all the broth left in your bowl when the fish is gone, it’s too good to waste.


6 Recipes to Simmer Over this Weekend

Buttery cod is slowly simmered in a broth of crushed tomatoes and saffron threads for a tender dinner that flakes apart at the touch of a fork.

Poached Cod with Tomato and Saffron

Apple cider reduces into a seasonal syrup for these fluffy but chewy yeasted waffles. Be sure to start the waffle batter the night before—the overnight rise creates their unforgettable texture.

Overnight Waffles

Cider Syrup

In this simple dish, yellow lentils simmer with turmeric and smoky black cardamom. As the lentils cook, whole spices like cinnamon sticks and cardamom pods are fried in oil to make tadka—a seasoned and deeply flavored oil that makes the topping for a healthy and comforting Indian dinner you should be having all the time.

Tadka Dhal

A homemade curry paste of ginger and guajillo chiles—AKA khao soi—brings the heat in the base of this Thai-inspired soup that’s brimming with juicy dark chicken meat and creamy coconut milk. Noodles are coated with the deeply flavored sauce for the best take on chicken noodle soup you’ve had this season.

Chicken Khao Soi

After bubbling on the backburner, cheesy grits form the foundation for this wintry take on the grain bowl, with crisp bits of bacon and spicy wilted chard providing crunch and nourishment (respectively). A poached egg is added at the end, of course. This is brunch!

Cheesy Grits With Poached Eggs, Greens, and Bacon

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Since 1995, Epicurious has been the ultimate food resource for the home cook, with daily kitchen tips, fun cooking videos, and, oh yeah, over 33,000 recipes.

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How to Cook Fish à la Nage: Poached in a Flavorful Broth

There are a lot of ways to prepare fish. You can broil it, fry it, grill it, sear it in a pan, or roast it. You can cure it for ceviche or gravlax, cold- or hot-smoke it, or even eat it completely raw. One of my favorites, though, is to take my fish for a swim.

"Take it for a swim? Even though it's dead?" you may ask.

Mais oui, mes amis, that's exactly right! All you have to do is cook your fish à la nage.* Translated literally, it means something like "in the swim," which makes next to no sense in English, so let's call it "swimming style." To put it another way, we might describe it as poached. But "poached" doesn't fully get at the idea behind an à la nage preparation. Way back in the day, the term referred to a specific way of cooking shellfish in a court bouillon, a light broth acidified with white wine or lemon juice. In more recent times, it's loosened to include any kind of fish cooked in a light broth with vegetables, herbs, and other aromatic ingredients, then served with that broth and those vegetables.

I love it for a few reasons. First, it's an incredibly easy way to prepare fish, since you can do it all in one pan and then serve it directly from there. It's quick, too—just whip up a broth that's infused with whatever ingredients you've decided to include, add the fish, and poach it, covered, until just cooked through. It's perfect in the summer, when lighter dishes appeal more than gut-busters. And while I've never been bothered by the smell of a fish roasting in my home, I know some folks can be sensitive to that those of you who are may be interested to know that this gentle poaching in a closed pan leads to absolutely minimal fish smell lingering in your kitchen later. Finally, it's a preparation that's open to endless variation.

Because the fish is only partially submerged, this cooking method offers the benefits of both steaming and poaching. Poaching is a gentle cooking method, but steaming is even gentler the portion of the fish above the liquid level cooks more slowly, making the method that much more foolproof. Meanwhile, because it's half submerged, the fish still manages to flavor—and, to some degree, be flavored by—the poaching liquid below.

Making an à la nage preparation is very simple. I start by sautéing aromatic vegetables, like onion, garlic, celery, and fennel, in oil or butter until translucent.

Then I add the poaching liquid, which can include wine, water, fish stock, clam juice, you name it. If I add wine or another alcohol, I'll usually add it first and let some of its alcohol boil off before adding the rest of the liquid.

Then I nestle the fish into the broth—which should be just deep enough to partially cover the fish—bring it to a simmer, and cover with a lid. When the fish is cooked, it's ready to serve, typically in just minutes.

To get you started, I've come up with three recipes that run the gamut of flavor, from an incredibly light and delicate one featuring wild salmon with summer squash and tomatoes to a much bolder, Thai-style number with cod, coconut milk, lime juice, and fish sauce.

Below are descriptions of each one, but keep in mind that you can change things up however you wish: All sorts of fish will work in each of these preparations, so it's much better to get the best-quality (and the most sustainable) fish you can find than to stick to the specific types of fish mentioned here. Wild striped bass, for instance, would stand in perfectly for the halibut and cod shown below, while responsibly farmed salmon is absolutely fine in place of the wild stuff. Frankly, you could use salmon in any of these, or a firm white-fleshed fish (like halibut, cod, or bass) in place of the salmon. There's really nothing strict about it.

Salmon à la Nage With Summer Vegetables

This recipe, made with summer squash and cherry tomatoes, is by far the most delicate of the three variations here. If you're looking for a flavor bomb, skip down to one of the other two, because this is not it. Why so delicate? Well, sometimes I feel that in the search for ever-bolder tastes that jolt our mouths to attention, we lose sight of the benefits of subtlety.

Summer squash, for instance, is a very mild vegetable, especially when poached, as it is here—there's really not much opportunity to concentrate its flavor. I'm okay with that in this case. I add a few aromatics to kick things up, like a little ginger, tarragon, and lemon, but the overall flavor is gentle, quiet. The salmon is medium-rare, the broth clean, bright, but not jarring.

In my mind, I'm eating a bowl of this on a porch in the Rocky Mountains, looking out at a valley that rises up to green summer slopes and snow-capped summits, with a really cold, crisp white next to me, sweating in its glass. I have no idea why, but honestly, doesn't that sound perfect?

Halibut à la Nage With Clams, Fennel, and White Wine

A lot of classic nage recipes include shellfish, so this one is a nod in that direction. The broth is white wine–based, then topped up with water. In all nage recipes, the fish gently flavors the broth as it cooks, but here we're doubling down on that: When the clams open, they release their juices into the broth, flavoring it even further. In some ways, this one is like a clear chowder, done à la minute, as all à la nage preparations should be.

Cod à la Nage With Coconut Milk, Lemongrass, and Lime

The most flavor-forward of the three, this one calls up Thai cuisine, using coconut milk, lemongrass, ginger, lime juice, fish sauce, and fresh chili peppers. If you want a richer broth, go ahead and use all coconut milk for the liquid it'll be thick and intense and, frankly, a little fatty. If you want to lighten it a bit, you can substitute half the coconut milk with vegetable or fish broth.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 pound cod, cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 6 tablespoons water
  • 5 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 3 green onions, diced
  • 1 (2 inch) piece ginger, cut into thin strips
  • 4 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • ¾ teaspoon red pepper flakes, or more to taste
  • ¼ teaspoon Chinese five-spice powder (Optional)

Arrange cod into the bottom of a saucepan.

Mix water, soy sauce, green onions, ginger, garlic, sesame oil, red pepper flakes, and Chinese five-spice powder together in a bowl pour over the cod.

Place saucepan over high heat and bring liquid to a boil reduce heat to low and cook at a simmer until cod flakes easily with a fork, 12 to 15 minutes. Remove cod from liquid with a slotted spoon.


Recipes for Sasha

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (optional)
  • 2 pints of multi colored cherry tomatoes (red/yellow/orange), sliced in half
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Pinch of saffron threads
  • Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper
  • 4 5-ounce skinless cod fillets

Heat oil in a medium skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and red pepper and cook, stirring often, until fragrant (garlic should not take on any color), about 3 minutes.

Add tomatoes, wine, bay leaves, saffron, and 1/2 cup water. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until flavors meld, 5–7 minutes season with salt and pepper.

Reduce heat to medium-low season cod with salt and pepper and place in skillet. Cover and cook at a bare simmer until cod is opaque throughout and beginning to flake, 5–7 minutes (thicker pieces will take longer to cook).


Watch the video: Alison Romans Tomato-Poached Fish with Chile Oil. NYT Cooking (December 2021).