Traditional recipes

Vegetarian Italian Meatballs

Vegetarian Italian Meatballs

Tired of not being able to enjoy meatballs with your pasta because you don’t eat meat? Look to these meat-free meatballs as a good alternative.

This recipe is provided by Lightlife.

Ingredients

  • 14 Ounces meat-free beef, such as Lightlife Gimme Lean Beef
  • 1/3 Cup seasoned bread crumbs
  • 1/4 Cup soy milk or water
  • 2 Tablespoons finely chopped fresh onion
  • 3/4 Teaspoons salt
  • 2 Teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 egg or equivalent replacement
  • 1/2 Teaspoon garlic powder

Nutritional Facts

Servings4

Calories Per Serving188

Folate equivalent (total)28µg7%

Riboflavin (B2)0.3mg15.9%


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.


How To Make Vegetarian 'Meatballs' That Actually Taste Good

The Meatball Shop in Manhattan sells dozens of meatballs, but some of their most popular varieties don’t actually contain meat.1 It’s not the only restaurant jumping on the meatless meatball trend. Furniture giant IKEA added veggie balls to their deli menus as an eco-friendly alternative to their high-carbon-footprint Swedish meatballs.2

The concept of meatless meatballs may sound like an oxymoron, but when done well, they’re delicious – light, crunchy, and zinging with surprising flavor combinations. If you already love meatballs, it’s time to discover meatless varieties. And if you have a limited diet – whether you’re vegetarian, vegan, or gluten-free – there’s nothing more versatile than a meatball. You can swap out ingredients to suit your dietary needs, use a variety of different cooking methods, and serve them on pasta, in soup, as sliders, and in numerous other ways. Read on to learn how to master the delightful meatless meatball.