Traditional recipes

Orange and Soy-Glazed Baby Back Ribs

Orange and Soy-Glazed Baby Back Ribs

Summer isn't the only time to enjoy sticky ribs-these baby backs, showered with citrus zest, also work well in winter. You can customize the size of the zest by using a Microplane for smaller pieces or a 5-hole zester for longer strips.

Ingredients

  • 3 1/2 pounds baby back pork ribs, cut between bones into individual ribs (18–20 ribs)
  • 9 garlic cloves, minced, divided
  • 5 teaspoons cumin seeds, divided
  • 3 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes, divided
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 6 scallions (white and light-green parts separated from dark-green parts), finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 cups fresh orange juice plus zest from 1 orange
  • Zest from 1 lemon and 1 lime

Recipe Preparation

  • Place ribs, 1/2 cup soy sauce, 3 minced garlic cloves, 2 tsp. cumin seeds, and 1 tsp. red pepper flakes in a large pot; add water to cover completely. Bring to a boil and immediately reduce to a simmer. Cover with lid ajar; cook until ribs are tender, about 2 hours. Drain ribs; set aside for 10 minutes.

  • Meanwhile, heat oil in a small saucepan over medium heat; add remaining 3 tsp. cumin seeds and 2 tsp. red pepper flakes. Toast lightly until fragrant, about 30 seconds; add remaining 6 minced garlic cloves and white and pale-green scallions. Sauté until just soft, about 2 minutes. Add remaining 1/2 cup soy sauce, orange juice, and honey. Bring to a boil and cook until sauce is thick, 12–15 minutes.

  • Preheat broiler. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil. Place ribs on prepared sheet; brush with sauce. Broil until sauce bubbles, 2–3 minutes. Turn, brush with additional sauce, and broil until ribs are heated through and sauce is bubbling, 2–3 minutes longer. Transfer to a platter. Drizzle with remaining sauce. Sprinkle dark-green scallions and citrus zest over.

Recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen,

Nutritional Content

6 servings, 1 serving contains: Calories (kcal) 608.8 %Calories from Fat 62.6 Fat (g) 42.4 Saturated Fat (g) 14.1 Cholesterol (mg) 148.9 Carbohydrates (g) 17.8 Dietary Fiber (g) 0.6 Total Sugars (g) 15.1 Net Carbs (g) 17.2 Protein (g) 38.3 Sodium (mg) 1873.0Reviews Section

Memorial Day Weekend! Time to bring out the Orange and Soy-Glazed Ribs and Coleslaw with Apple and Yogurt Dressing to go with them!

I first saw a version of the Ribs recipe in a winter issue of Bon Appetit. In it, BA used baby back ribs. I love those little guys but for a main course, to me nothing beats St. Louis-cut Ribs. Baby Backs are smaller and have less meat on them. St. Louis are a trimmed version of Spare Ribs. They have a lot more meat than Baby Backs. I prefer them to anything the supermarket packages up. Those ribs always seem to have so much waste and inedible bits that I go out of my way to find the St. Louis cut. The original recipe was advertised as being a way of not having to wait for summer to enjoy the incomparable taste of great pork ribs. No grilling required, they bubble away on the top of the stove for most of the cooking time: Only at the very end do they go under the broiler to get their glaze and then only for minutes a side.

The Coleslaw gets its tang
from Green Apples and
Greek Yogurt

Ribs would be nothing without Cole Slaw. I would miss the light green and carrot salad’s contrast with the ebony ribs. But it’s not just the color contrast. This particular Cole Slaw, made with green apple and Greek yogurt is a lively, tart contrast to the richness of the ribs.


Finger-Lickin’ Good Pork Rib Recipes

Don’t ribs taste better the old fashioned way? What’s better than skipping utensils and digging into a saucy rack of ribs with nothing but your hands during a backyard barbecue? If you’re ready to prepare some finger-lickin’ good pork ribs, these easy, fall-off-the-bone recipes are sure to make your mouth water.

Oven Barbecue Pork Ribs

No smoker? No problem! Enjoy BBQ ribs made entirely in the oven. The deep blend of spices makes for a tender and juicy dish, and the smoky aroma will fill your entire house, yum!

Balsamic Glazed Baby Back Ribs

We never say no to tangy, juicy, peppercorn-infused ribs. There’s something extra special about a low, slow, and savoury grill.

Cajun-Spiced Barbecue Ribs

If you’re anything like us, you love trying recipes off the beaten path. Trade in sweet and spicy for herbal and earthy, but never without a slight fiery kick! You’ll love the truly tender, fall-off-the-bone ribs that result!

Orange and Soy-Glazed Baby Back Ribs

A generous glaze goes a long way! This garlic, orange-filled recipe is the perfect amount of hot and sweet that will leave everyone reaching for more!

Mmm, who’s ready to cook up some melt in your mouth ribs!?

The good news is we're running a red HOT rib sale this month (April 1st-30th, 2019) – 30% off pork ribs! 3 Racks of Baby Back Ribs OR 5 Racks of Side Ribs for $40! Slow roast, smoke or braise em! Walk-in, or pre-order by contacting us today today!


Eye for a Recipe

We don’t have a barbecue at the apartment and one of the things we miss most over the winter is grilled baby back ribs. So I was delighted to see this recipe for Orange and Soy-Glazed Baby Back Ribs in the January 2012 issue of Bon Appetit. The ribs are parboiled for a couple of hours in water flavoured with soy sauce, garlic, cumin seeds and red pepper flakes. This renders the fat from the ribs. Meanwhile, make a sauce with spices, garlic, scallions, soy sauce, orange juice and honey. To finish the ribs, place them on a cookie sheet, brush with the sauce and broil for a few minutes on each side. Garnish with citrus zest, more sauce and enjoy!

Avoiding Additives and Preservatives

The ingredient to watch out for in this recipe is the soy sauce. Use tamari, which is preserved with alcohol instead of sodium benzoate.

Parboil the ribs to cook them and render the fat

Place parboiled ribs on cookie sheet, brush with sauce and broil

Garnish the ribs with sauce and citrus zest

Orange and soy-glazed baby back ribs

Ingredients:

3 ½ pounds baby back pork ribs, cut between bones into individual ribs (18–20 ribs)

9 garlic cloves, minced, divided

5 teaspoons cumin seeds, divided

3 teaspoons crushed red pepper flakes, divided

3 tablespoons vegetable oil

6 scallions (white and light-green parts separated from dark-green parts), finely chopped

1 ½ cups fresh orange juice plus zest from 1 orange

Zest from 1 lemon and 1 lime

Preparation:

Place ribs, ½ cup soy sauce, 3 minced garlic cloves, 2 tsp. cumin seeds, and 1 tsp. red pepper flakes in a large pot add water to cover completely. Bring to a boil and immediately reduce to a simmer. Cover with lid ajar cook until ribs are tender, about 2 hours. Drain ribs set aside for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, heat oil in a small saucepan over medium heat add remaining 3 tsp. cumin seeds and 2 tsp. red pepper flakes. Toast lightly until fragrant, about 30 seconds add remaining 6 minced garlic cloves and white and pale-green scallions. Sauté until just soft, about 2 minutes. Add remaining 1/2 cup soy sauce, orange juice, and honey. Bring to a boil and cook until sauce is thick, 12–15 minutes.

Preheat broiler. Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil. Place ribs on prepared sheet brush with sauce. Broil until sauce bubbles, 2–3 minutes. Turn, brush with additional sauce, and broil until ribs are heated through and sauce is bubbling, 2–3 minutes longer. Transfer to a platter. Drizzle with remaining sauce. Sprinkle dark-green scallions and citrus zest over. Serves 4-6.


The History Of Soy Sauce

Before we start talking about some of the things that we can use soy sauce for, we thought it would be nice to talk about the storied history of this product. It’s believed that it can be traced back to a sauce known as Jan in ancient China. Various forms of Jan were developed using different combinations of fruit, seaweed, and vegetables. That was over 2,200 years ago.

The Jan that was designed for grains was made from wheat, rice, and soybeans and this was believed to be the archetype for modern soy sauce. This sauce would migrate to Japan sometime during the 7th century when Buddhism was introduced to the country.

As far as production in the U.S., that didn’t start until 1908. This is when the Hawaiian Yamajo Soy Company started in the Territory of Hawaii. In 1933, La Choy began producing and selling a hydrolyzed vegetable protein-based soy sauce.


One-Hour Orange and Soy-Glazed Baby Back Ribs

Smoked or grilled meats bring out the best in Tempranillo. Oaky, smoky, dark and bold, Ribera Tempranillo is a wonderful pairing for a rack of ribs. Busting myths that ribs need to be slowly cooked in whole slabs over wood fire, this recipe is quick and simple enough for any weeknight dinner, and yet delicious enough that no one will know they weren’t slow-smoking all day long.

4 pounds baby back ribs
1 cup freshly-squeezed orange juice
½ reduced-sodium soy sauce
¼ cup honey
6 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon smoked paprika

Heat oven to 425 ° F. If there is a papery membrane on the bone side of your ribs, remove it by loosening with a butter knife and peeling it off, using a paper towel for grip. Cut the slabs of ribs into individual ribs. Season with salt and pepper.

Line a rimmed baking sheet with foil and add ribs in a single layer. Cover tightly with foil and bake for one hour (prepare sauce while ribs bake).

In a small saucepan, combine orange juice, soy sauce, honey, garlic, and paprika. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to medium (reduce heat further if necessary to keep from boiling over) and cook until reduced to syrup consistency, about 30 minutes. Set aside.

Remove ribs from oven and raise heat to 500 ° F. Uncover ribs and pour off any accumulated fat. Brush sauce generously on ribs, paying extra attention to the meaty side. Return to oven until the glaze is sticky and starting to char, 5-10 minutes.

WINE PAIRING: A Tempranillo from Ribera del Duero with some oak aging goes well with these subtly smoky ribs. Try Legaris Crianza, Cepa 21 “Horcajo,” Bodegas López Cristobal Roble Crianza or Bodegas Alvides Crianza.

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Robin's Healthy Take: Last-Minute Appetizers

Looking for hostess gift for a holiday party? Or are you hosting your own gathering and need quick, easy nosh ideas? I was just faced with an impromptu gathering at my house and needed refreshments for a hungry crowd. Here are 5 festive ways to feed your friends and family, fast.

Every December, my husband and I take our boys and a bunch of friends on a pontoon lake ride near our house. Most of the lake-front homes are fully decorated and it’s awesome to see the shimmering lights from the water. I always bring snacks, but since the ride is just 45 minutes, I don’t go "overboard" if you know what I mean. This year, 30 minutes before the ride, we were canceled because of rain. Never one to miss a party, I invited everyone to my house. I threw together a bunch of fun and easy appetizers that everyone loved -- I think you will, too.

Stuffed Peppadew Peppers: Fill peppadew peppers (from a 14-ounce jar) with herbed goat cheese, black pepper goat cheese or herbed cream cheese. Or, make your own herbed goat cheese by folding fresh parsley, basil, dried oregano and black pepper into regular soft goat cheese.

Caprese Tartlets: Spoon a little basil pesto into the bottom of mini puff pastry shells (sold in the freezer section with the regular puff pastry) and then top with a cube of fresh mozzarella and a few thin slices of oil-packed sundried tomatoes bake at 350 degrees for 5 to 10 minutes, until the tarts are crisp and the cheese starts to melt.

Orange-Soy Glazed Shrimp: Combine 1 cup of orange marmalade, 1 tablespoon soy sauce and 1 teaspoon of sesame oil in a large skillet and bring to a simmer. Add 1 pound cooked large or jumbo shrimp (peeled and deveined with the tails on) and simmer until the liquid reduces the shrimp are covered with the glaze. Top with chopped fresh cilantro before serving.

Pesto Twists: Unroll a thawed sheet of frozen puff pastry onto a flat surface spread basil pesto all over the dough fold in half, covering the filling. Cut into 16 strips and twist each strip into a spiral. Place on a baking sheet and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake at 400 degrees for 12-15 minutes, until puffed up and golden brown.

Brie and Pear Quesadillas: Coat a large skillet or griddle with cooking spray and preheat to medium-high. Spread Brie on flour tortillas and place the tortillas on the hot pan, Brie side up top one side with thinly sliced pears and a drizzle of honey. Fold the tortilla in half and cook until golden brown on both sides. Cut into wedges before serving.


Our secret tip

Luckily it turns out that you don’t have to be a grill master to make perfect ribs because there is an easy, no-fuss technique that works every single time. The secret? Cook them in the oven. Yup. It’s true. Ribs need to be cooked low and slow, preferably with some moisture involved and the oven is a perfect place to make that happen. Seriously, it’s like magic!

And speaking of magic. Oh em gee, this sauce. These might be the four most mouth-watering words in the English language Spicy Bourbon-Honey Glaze. It’s like everything good in the world had a party, got on really well and decided to live together in peace and harmony in your mouth.

Make a packet out of foil, and add a little apple juice, seal it up and cook it at a low temperature for about 4 hours. (This may not be the last time you see a juice box in one of our photos. THEY’RE SO VERSATILE.)

While not the quickest process in the world, the bourbon honey ribs are so worth it. My suggestion is to make more than you think you’ll need because these go fast. They also make great leftovers (just heated up or use the pulled meat in sandwiches).


As a professional cook my experience ranges from recipe development to running a large commercial kitchen, being an entrepreneur and business owner, running this blog, and to multi-tasking as a personal chef. So, I may not have the best advice on world affairs or baby names, but I do know a thing or two about food.

My commercial clients generally find my recipe development services and my food photography most useful. For private clients, I offer in-home personal chef services, and dinner parties (either at your home or in my home).


Slow-Roasted Barbeque Spare Ribs

Mary Anne here. My family LOVES to throw down…and no one more so than my brother Steve. Steve lives on the water in Rhode Island and has just about as many parties as there are weekends in a year! The home he shares with his wife and three daughters has become our official family reunion epicenter. And we’ll use just about any excuse to get together and enjoy tubing off the back of his boat, sipping Margaritas in his hot tub, and then feasting on a family effort of flavorful food. Steve’s wife, Martha, facilitates his efforts by organizing, shopping (often she can be found in a grocery store when most people are in bed!) and endlessly cleaning up after us. She is an amazingly good sport when the Ellicott clan descends upon her home!

Steve calls me frequently with questions about how to prepare, plan, and execute various fiestas he’s hosting. He’s an incredible home-chef, and while I have taught him many techniques in food prep and shared a multitude of my recipes, I am in awe of his mastery over all things grilled. When I need advice in the backyard arena, his phone number is the first thing I reach for.

The following recipe uses my rub and homemade BBQ sauce, but the execution is all Steve’s. He has admitted to me that his incredible ribs are sauced with store-bought BBQ, so clearly the flavor is in the way he patiently slow-roasts the pork before it hits the heat of the grill. If you find BBQ sauce on sale, go for it! Otherwise, try this one as it takes less than 20 minutes of actual prep time and then another 45 minutes to simmer with just the occasional stir.

Slow-Roasted Barbeque Spare Ribs
Serves 6

Ingredients for the Rub (enough for a 5-6 lb. rack of ribs):
5 to 6 lb rack of pork spareribs – $10.85
NOTE: I prefer pork ribs over beef and I never buy baby back ribs (cut from the pork loin), as they are incredibly expensive. The ribs I purchased for this rendering were on sale at my local market for $1.99 a pound.
1 Tablespoon kosher salt – stock
1 Tablespoon cracked black pepper – stock
1 Tablespoon chili powder – stock
2 Tablespoons light brown sugar, firmly packed – stock
1 ½ Tablespoons paprika – stock
1 Tablespoon onion flakes – stock
1 Teaspoon ground ginger – stock

Ingredients for the BBQ Sauce:
Makes 1 quart
2 Tablespoons olive oil – stock
1 large Vidalia onion, finely chopped – .79
3 cloves garlic, minced – stock
1 – 6 oz. can tomato paste – .69
1 – 28 oz. can tomato puree – $1.79
2 Tablespoons Dark Brown Sugar, firmly packed stock
2 Tablespoons unsulfured molasses – stock
¼ cup orange Juice – .69
2 Tablespoons Dijon-style mustard – stock
1 Teaspoon Worcestershire Sauce – stock
½ Teaspoon cayenne pepper – stock
2 ½ Tablespoons freshly grated Ginger – .59
1 Teaspoon paprika – stock
2 Teaspoons chili powder – stock
1 Teaspoon Liquid Smoke (optional)
Salt and Pepper to taste
Grand Total Assuming Well-Stocked Pantry: $15.40
Total Per Serving: $2.57

Rub Directions:
1. Combine all of the seasonings and grind to a powdery substance using either a mortar and pestle or the back of a round soup spoon.

2. Rub onto both sides of the rack of ribs really massage well.

3. Cover and refrigerate 8 hours or overnight. This begins the tenderizing process.

BBQ Sauce Directions:
1. Heat the oil in a heavy Dutch Oven (or a heavy skillet if you don’t have a Dutch Oven). Sauté the onion over medium-high flame for 10 minutes, stirring often.

2. Add the garlic and sauté an additional 5 minutes.

3. Add all of the remaining ingredients and bring to a bubble (it doesn’t really boil as it’s a thick mix). Reduce the heat and simmer uncovered for about 45 minutes until thick and the tomatoes have lost much of their acidity. Store in the fridge until ready to grill.

Directions for Slow-Cooking the Ribs:
1. Preheat the oven to 250 degrees.

2. Choose a roasting pan large enough to accommodate the rack. If needed, you can cut the rack into more manageable pieces if your pans aren’t large enough to roast it whole.

3. Set a metal rack or invert a muffin tin into the bottom of the roasting pan. Fill with water, about ¼ inch up from the bottom. Place the prepared ribs on top of the metal rack or inverted muffin tin (the water should not be touching the meat.) Cover with foil.

4. Roast in the oven for 4 to 4 ½ hours. This method produces the tenderest spare rib you’ll ever taste! Just be sure not to over cook them or they’ll be falling off the bones before you can get them onto the grill! I start checking them about 3 ½ hours into the cooking time. They’re done when a fork easily lifts the meat from the bone.

5. As soon as the ribs come out of the oven, slather them up on both sides with the BBQ sauce. After 15 minutes, repeat the “slathering” step. You will be amazed how the pork absorbs the sauce! ( **These can be prepared up to this point the day before. If you do that, wrap in foil and store in the fridge. Bring the meat back to room temperature before proceeding.)

6. Preheat the grill. When hot, sear the ribs, about 5 minutes on each side. Be careful not to burn them. Transfer to a cutting board. To carve, cut one side of each rib close to the bone. Repeat down the line and then transfer the pieces to a serving platter.


Watch the video: Sticky Pork Ribs. Gordon Ramsay (December 2021).