Traditional recipes

Melt, the Other, Other Butter Substitute

Melt, the Other, Other Butter Substitute

There's a new butter substitute product lining store shelves across the country, but this time, it's something that actually lives up to its promise. It's called Melt — and the creator behind the product, Cygnia F. Rapp, founder and chief science officer for Prosperity Organic Foods, sat down with The Daily Meal to talk about Melt's merits.

The Daily Meal: So first things first, tell us, what is Melt?

Cygnia Rapp: Melt is a dairy-free, soy-free, organic buttery spread that is created from a blend of virgin coconut oil, flaxseed oil, palm fruit oil, canola oil, and sunflower oil. It can be used for anything you would use butter for, including baking.

TDM: What led you to create this product?

CR: About 10 years ago, I began suffering from digestive disorders that forced me to eliminate certain foods from my diet, including butter. At the time, I couldn’t find a product on the market that was truly satisfying as a butter substitute. So I set out to create my own.

TDM: How did you come to formulate this product?

CR: I came from outside the food industry — prior to creating Melt, I had been a practicing, registered geologist for 10 years. That gave me the scientific background to start thinking about creating such a product, but it also gave me the outside perspective that was so valuable in figuring out just what kind of product to create in order to fill a gap in the market.

TDM: What sets Melt apart from other products on the market?

CR: Melt is different from other butter substitutes on the market because it uses virgin coconut oil processed at low temperatures, which helps it retain more healthful qualities. Many other butter substitutes on the market are advertised as healthy and heart-healthy, but usually contain soy oil that has been chemically extracted using solvents such as hexane.

Melt also has an ideal ratio of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids and contains 425 milligrams of omega-3s per serving. It has half the saturated fat of butter and contains just 80 calories per tablespoon versus 120 calories per tablespoon for butter and most cooking oils.

TDM: How do you like to use Melt?

CR: I think it's great for lightly steamed vegetables, as a dip for artichokes and shrimp, topping baked sweet potatoes, lightly coating grilled salmon, and even in smoothies.

Melt also comes in another variation flavored with honey, which combines the sweetness of honey with the rich creaminess of butter, and so it's great on foods like corn muffins, steamed carrots, and baked yams.

TDM: Where can we find Melt?

CR: You can find Melt in retailers across the country, including Whole Foods, Winn-Dixie, Wegmans Markets, Andronico's, Draeger's, and Mollie Stone's. You can also purchase it online on our website, and there's also a handy store locator if you want to get your hands on it right away.

Will Budiaman is the Recipe Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @WillBudiaman.


Shortening vs. butter in baking

Vegetable shortening can be a mysterious ingredient. I’d never plunged my spatula into the cloud-like stuff until a few months ago when I was baking in the test kitchen. Growing up, I always reached for a trusty kitchen staple instead: butter. But recently as I whipped up batches of cookies and a plethora of pies, I began to wonder about the difference between using shortening vs. butter in baking.

Butter

Butter is a familiar ingredient. We know it comes from cows, and it’s delicious on toast. It’s made by churning fresh or fermented cream, and then separating solids from the liquid (which is then sold as buttermilk). It’s about 80% butterfat, plus 18% water and 1% to 2% milk solids.

Shortening

Shortening on the other hand is a bit more complicated, starting with the name. “Shortening” actually refers to all fats and oils, but what we’re talking about here is hydrogenated vegetable oil shortening (such as Crisco).

This kind of shortening is typically made from soybean, cottonseed, or palm oil. It goes through a special process called hydrogenation so it remains semi-solid at room temperature. It’s 100% fat, unlike butter.

Even though these ingredients are clearly different, shortening and butter are often used interchangeably in recipes with acceptable results. But if you’re looking to make the very best baked goods, like so many of us King Arthur Flour bakers, which should you use?

Shortening vs. butter: the ingredient to reach for depends on what you’re baking.

Cookies

If you’ve ever had a tray of cookies morph into one huge mess in the oven, it’s time to listen up.

Cookies made with butter, especially high-sugar recipes, tend to be flatter and crispier than cookies made with shortening. Because of butter’s low melting point, the dough tends to spread during baking before the structure sets.

To see just how different the spread would be, I baked two batches of our Self-Rising Crunchy Sugar Cookies (one made with all butter, one with all shortening), for another shortening vs. butter in baking comparison.

As predicted, the cookies made with shortening spread less and remained slightly rounded, thanks to the higher melting point. These cookies had what’s called a “short” texture. You might recognize this slightly sandy, crumbly feel as the characteristic texture of shortbread. (Yum.)

If you’re having problems with cookies spreading, you might try replacing some of the butter with shortening. Keep in mind this is just one reason why cookies spread there’s a multitude of factors you can adjust if you’re committed to using butter for its rich flavor.

A quick fix? Consider chilling your butter-based cookie dough to help control spread (and bonus, you'll also experience a wonderful depth of flavor, too!).

What about cake? We know shortening adds tenderness since it's 100% fat, so some of us curious bakers started wondering what would happen if it was used to make cake.

Would the cake rise in the oven? Or would it collapse? Would it have a large crumb? We needed to find out!

Our Back-to-Basics Yellow Cake was the recipe of choice for this experiment — it’s a standard butter cake that uses a cup of fat. One cake was baked using all butter, while shortening was the fat of choice in the other.

The result? The difference between shortening vs. butter was underwhelming when judged by appearance alone. The height was comparable, as were the color and crumb.

The texture of the cake made with shortening, however was quite pleasant — tender, lofty, and light. When shortening is creamed with sugar, it traps air molecules, which helps to leaven cakes and make them tender. A fork slides through a slice of shortening-based cake easier than one made with butter.

You might be thinking, then why don’t more cake recipes call for shortening?

Flavor. What’s a cake if it doesn’t taste great? The rich creaminess of a classic butter cake is hard to replace.

Buttercream frosting

It might seem like butter would be the obvious choice when making buttercream frosting, and if you’re going for best flavor, it’s a worthy option.

But shortening might have its place in your frosting recipe too. Because it’s 100% fat, it helps make buttercream more stable than an all-butter buttercream, which can begin to separate at warm temperatures.

It’s a sad sight to see a beautifully piped cake wilt in the sun as the baker stands by watching helplessly. We replicated hot, summery conditions (when so many of us cake bakers are called upon) by putting frosted cupcakes in a low oven for 10 minutes.

The results were drastic: the all-butter buttercream melted and spread down the sides of the cupcake, while the buttercream made with shortening held its shape.

But you trade stability for flavor.

So if heat isn't a problem, you might want to stick with a Classic Buttercream recipe.

Making the choice: Shortening vs. butter in baking

It’s clear that both shortening and butter have their virtues and vices. They can both be used to make delicious, tender baked goods that are full of flavor and richness.

There might be certain cases when it just makes more sense to use butter, like in a classic cake perhaps. There are other times when a can of Crisco is now the thing I reach for: when making pie crust, frosting, and even sandwich cookie filling.

The virtue of butter vs. shortening is a passionate topic for many bakers, and we explore both here for their distinctive baking qualities. Each baker brings unique needs and perspectives to the table, and it’s our sincere hope everyone will choose ingredients that best embrace their personal goals.

Interested in more baking science? Check out our post on cookie chemistry, covering how to attain the perfect bendy/chewy/crisp/crunchy cookie texture you want!

A special thanks to fellow employee-owner Nic Doak for taking the photos for this blog.


The temperature of the butter is all wrong

The most successful way to consistently produce amazing baked goods is to follow the recipes in front of you. Sure, there is a little room for improvisation, but baking requires more precision than more cooking. So, following the recipe is especially key. This is perhaps no more important than when it comes to butter. According to Bon Appetit, if the recipe calls for a specific temperature butter, like room temperature or melted, then you had best do whatever the recipe says. Not doing so will almost certainly doom your project. The need for the proper temperature butter reflects the physics going on in the baking process. Butter in its different forms functions differently, allowing for other chemical reactions to happen. What can happen in melted butter cannot necessarily happen in room temperature butter, and so on.

Obviously, if you are going to use it for frying this matters less as you will be melting the butter in order to cook with it. For baking, however, paying attention to the butter temperature called for in the recipe is critical.


The 7 Best Non-Dairy Butters Substitutes For Vegans, According To Nutritionists

Non-dairy butter used to mean sketchy oils and zero flavor, but the plant-based diet trend has completely changed the game. In fact, whether you're vegan or not, you might just consider swapping your usual Land O' Lakes for for a stick or tub of the dairy-free stuff.

&ldquoMost vegan butters are made to function like dairy butter, but contain significantly less saturated fat,&rdquo says nutritionist Kelly Jones, RD. &ldquoUnfortunately, this meant the use of hydrogenated and partially hydrogenated oils, or trans fats.&rdquo

Though there's still plenty of debate about whether or not saturated fats are bad for you, trans fats have been linked with a number of chronic health issues.

Luckily, today's butter alternatives have stepped up their game. Many of the dairy-free butters you'll see on store shelves now keep saturated fat and cholesterol low without relying on trans fats.

&ldquoI love that companies are using olive and avocado oils as their products' bases, since they provide larger amounts of monounsaturated fats,&rdquo Jones says. If you opt for a vegan butter made from soybean oil, though, just choose organic or non-GMO to avoid pesticides. If opting for a palm oil-based product, choose one that's sustainably sourced.

Otherwise, as long as a product uses these heart-healthy sources of fat, Jones doesn't mind if the calorie and total fat content are the same as regular butter. "Fat is important for absorption of fat-soluble vitamins and phytochemicals, and helps to promote fullness,&rdquo she says.

Whether you need something to spread on toast or bake into muffins, these nutritionist-approved non-dairy butters are as flavorful as the real thing&mdashand oh-so good for you, too.


Oil

Coconut oil, olive oil, safflower oil, and coconut butter are some of the most used butter alternatives. Depending on temperature, coconut oil can be both a solid and a liquid. This versatility is exceedingly helpful depending on the intended use.

Coconut oil can add a different texture and flavor when used in place of butter. When baking with coconut oil, it is generally substituted for other fats on a 1:1 basis. If a recipe calls for ½ cup butter, you can use ½ cup coconut oil. When using coconut oil in place of butter for pie crusts, it is important to use solid, room temperature coconut oil to create a flakier crust. In addition to its versatility, coconut oil is packed full of medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) instead of the average saturated fats.

Olive oil is another alternative to butter, touting around 120 calories per tablespoon, 14 grams of total fat, and 0 grams of cholesterol. In terms of conversion, ½ cup of butter can be replaced by ¼ cup and 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Olive oil is generally best used when sautéeing, cooking, or as a dip and glaze for breads and pastries.

Safflower oil is another healthy butter alternative because it is low in saturated and trans fats. There are two types of safflower oil, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. Monounsaturated safflower oil has a high smoking point, so you can use it in high-temperature recipes. Polyunsaturated safflower oil is more delicate and should be used to drizzle on salads and a spread or topping.


The best butter substitute brands to buy.

Ready to take the plunge into butter substitutes? Here are 10 of the healthiest butter substitutes nutritionists recommend.

1. Earth Balance Pressed Avocado Oil

Palinski-Wade says this is a smart choice because it only has three ingredients and is rich in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, which can have a favorable impact on blood lipids. It's also perfect if you're following a vegan, dairy-free, or gluten-free diet.

2. Nutiva Coconut Manna

Nutiva makes this spread with pureed coconut and nothing else. That's right, it has just the one ingredient!

"This plant-based spread is sodium- and cholesterol-free, which makes it a great replacement for butter and cream cheese," says Palinski-Wade.

3. Carrington Farms Organic Ghee

What exactly is ghee, anyway? Basically, it's butter run through a clarification process to eliminate all the water (to create a higher smoke point while cooking). The process also eliminates many of the proteins found in dairy, like casein. Palinski-Wade says this makes ghee an alternative butter spread that's easier for people with a lactose sensitivity to tolerate. It's also especially good for your GI tract.

"Ghee contains a fatty acid known as butyrate acid, which may help to reduce inflammation and support digestive health," she says.

4. I Can't Believe It's Not Butter! Original

This brand is probably most synonymous with substitute butters, and Gorin says it's a perfect plant-based spread for many reasons. For one, it's American Heart Association Heart-Check certified. It also has 70 percent less saturated fat and 40 percent fewer calories than dairy butter.

It may even be better for the environment than dairy butter: "All of the palm oil it contains is sustainable," says Gorin, "and its production creates 70 percent less carbon emissions than dairy butter."

5. Olivio Ultimate Spread

Many of the Olivio alternative spreads are suitable replacements for dairy butter, but the Ultimate Spread really shines: the olive oil-based spread is vegan and non-GMO, plus contains no preservatives and a boost of ALA omega-3s, a type of fatty acid found in plants that may contribute to heart health.

6. Country Crock Plant Butter with Olive Oil

Palinski-Wade suggests using this plant-based spread made from olive oil as a substitute for butter spreads and any butter you need in cooking or baking as it has less saturated fat than butter. And according to Country Crock, production of their plant butter produces less than half the greenhouse gas emissions of dairy butter production.

7. Miyoko's Vegan Butter

Unlike some other vegan butter substitutes, you can use this brand for baking and cooking. Plus, it's also free of palm oil and is soy, lactose, and gluten-free, says Palinski-Wade, making it a versatile choice for many shoppers.

8. WayFare Salted Whipped Butter

You might raise your eyebrows at the inclusion of pureed lima beans in this vegan, gluten-free, soy-free, plant-based butter, but Palinski-Wade says the legumes lend a creamy consistency to this spread while keeping overall fat and calories low. This plant-based butter alternative incorporates blended lima beans for a creamy consistency with fewer overall calories and fat.

9. Benecol Buttery Spread

Looking for a healthy butter substitute that really boosts your nutrition profile? Lainey Younkin, MS, RD, dietitian at Lainey Younkin Nutrition, recommends Benecol, which includes plant stanols—a compound she says are proven to reduce total and LDL cholesterol, but are difficult to come by in a normal diet.

"While plant stanols occur naturally in foods, you'd have to eat 12 pounds of broccoli, 29 pounds of carrots, or 60 pounds of tomatoes every day to get the recommended two grams per day for cholesterol reduction," Younkin says.

Or you could eat Benecol, since four tablespoons contain the recommended two grams of plant stanols. Use it just like you would regular butter, Younkin adds, because it's a one-to-one swap.

10. Smart Balance Original Buttery Spread

This spread is dairy-, gluten-, partially hydrogenated oils-, and trans-fats-free. But don't think you're buying an empty tub. Smart Balance lands a final spot as a healthy butter substitute because the brand loaded their spread with heart-healthy oils, omega-3s, and vitamins, so it tastes yummy and is good for you, too.


Half and half

In recipes that heavy cream is used as a thickener, half and half can be used in its place. Since it’s half whole milk and half light cream, it can substitute heavy cream. Using half and half as a substitute for heavy cream, you should use it in the same proportion.

Like heavy cream, half and half can also be whipped, but it needs to be ice-cold to whip because it doesn’t contain as much fat as heavy cream.

Half and a half with butter

When combined with butter, half and half can be used as a substitute for heavy cream in many recipes. It is made from whole milk and cream, and it contains about 1/3 of the fat in heavy cream. Adding butter to half and half increases its fat percentage, making it a more suitable alternative to heavy cream in most recipes.

Half and half can be used to replace heavy cream without the addition of butter in certain recipes, for example, soups and sauces.

When substituting half and half and butter with heavy cream, mix 232 grams of half and a half with 29 grams of melted butter.


Butter fills several roles in baking, where it is used in a similar manner as other solid fats like lard, suet, or shortening, but has a flavor that may better complement sweet baked goods.

Many cookie doughs and some cake batters are leavened, at least in part, by creaming butter and sugar together, which introduces air bubbles into the butter. The tiny bubbles locked within the butter expand in the heat of baking and aerate the cookie or cake. Some cookies like shortbread may have no other source of moisture but the water in the butter.

Pastries like pie dough incorporate pieces of solid fat into the dough, which become flat layers of fat when the dough is rolled out. During baking, the fat melts away the flaky texture.

Butter, because of its flavor, is a common choice for the fat in such a dough, but it can be more difficult to work with than shortening because of its low melting point. Pastry makers often chill all their ingredients and utensils while working with a butter dough.


Lemon Cookies From Cake Mix Rice Krispies

Lemon Cookies From Cake Mix Rice Krispies. Heat and stir until smooth. Cookies from cake mixes recipes.

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Blue velvet rice krispie bars | Fruity pebble cheesecake . from i.pinimg.com Spoon in to 12 bun cases. You can substitute other flavors of cake mix (orange is good). The only ingredients are a box of cereal, a. Have you ever made cookies from a box of cake mix? Are you ready for the recipe?

I tried refrigerating dough to see if that would help with the cookies that spread tried the lemon but swapped butter for oil, delicious.

Next time i'm trying applesauce that i didn't have this time. The marshmallows could be the whipped cream part of the milkshake, if you will. In a large pot over medium heat, melt butter. (18 1/4 ounce) box lemon cake mix. Have you ever made cookies from a box of cake mix? The strawberry cake mix always makes thicker cookies for me, while yellow cake mixes will spread out more. Eggs, lemon cake mix, butter, rice krispies. Rice krispies cookies are super easy, filling breakfast cookie loaded with mini dark chocolate now it's time to add oats, rice krispies cereal, chocolate chips, and mix with a wooden spoon until frequently asked questions for the rice krispies cookies recipe: Well wrapped, these treats can be stored at room temperature or in the refrigerator for a few days. We are already 6 months into the year. In a large saucepan melt butter. 1/2 cup vegetable or canola oil. Cool 1 minute before removing from cookie sheet.

Mix all ingredients together well. Add kellogg's rice krispies cereal. In a large pot over medium heat, melt butter. But i think this lemon version deserves an equal demand and love, especially for those who are fan of lemony flavors. By www.ashleyscookingadventures.blogspot.com on may 4, 2010 in cookies, desserts may 4, 2010 cookiesdesserts.

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Can you freeze the cookie.

And that has meant mug cakes, cookies, and now a gooey, buttery rice krispie treat for one! Add kellogg's rice krispies cereal. Mix well and pour into a greased 7 square tin. 90g/ 3 oz rice krispies. The strawberry cake mix always makes thicker cookies for me, while yellow cake mixes will spread out more. Light, tangy cookies with the crunch of rice krispies. Cake mix makes cookie baking even easier. Remove from heat, add essence and rice krispies. Cookies from cake mixes recipes. Makes 3 to 4 dozen. 1/2 cup vegetable or canola oil. The butter, cream cheese and powdered sugar in this lemon cake mix cookie make. I warmed up a couple of tablespoons of store bought lemon frosting in the microwave.

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Berries and Cream Rice Krispies Treats | Cake mix cookie . from i.pinimg.com Quick and easy to prepare and delicious to enjoy! Add the rice krispies and stir in to the chocolate mix, gently. I tried refrigerating dough to see if that would help with the cookies that spread tried the lemon but swapped butter for oil, delicious. The butter, cream cheese and powdered sugar in this lemon cake mix cookie make. You can turn them into lemon crinkle cookies or spread a lemon glaze on them whenever you need a change.

With some nuts and maybe some chocolate chips, these tasty treats can be ready in a snap.

Cool 1 minute before removing from cookie sheet. This cookie has a chewy bottom crust with a sweet cream cheese layer on top. Not only do they taste amazing, they are super simple to make and only require 3 ingredients! Try cookies & creme rice krispies. Reviewed by millions of home cooks. Eggs, lemon cake mix, butter, rice krispies. Cookies from cake mixes recipes. Light, tangy cookies with the crunch of rice krispies. Are you ready for the recipe? Lemon cake mix cookies (with rice krispies). Melt the chocolate in small bursts in the microwave or over a bain marie (in a bowl over a saucepan of simmering water). Quick and easy to prepare and delicious to enjoy! Dust with cinnamon and serve.

With just 4 ingredients, these cake mix cookies are so easy to make and the perfect combination of tart and sweet. Next time i'm trying applesauce that i didn't have this time. Butter, or spray with a non stick vegetable spray, a 9 inch (23 cm) square baking pan. Eggs, lemon cake mix, butter, rice krispies. Try cookies & creme rice krispies.

Source: thegoldlininggirl.com

Ricotta, vanilla and lemon cookiesle ricette di micol. But i think this lemon version deserves an equal demand and love, especially for those who are fan of lemony flavors. Heat and stir until smooth. 6 cups kellogg's® rice krispies® cereal. Rice krispies + cake mix = woah.

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Source: www.foodtasticmom.com

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Source: media1.popsugar-assets.com

Melt the chocolate in small bursts in the microwave or over a bain marie (in a bowl over a saucepan of simmering water).

Lemon cake mix cookies (with rice krispies).

I don't always have lemon cake mix on hand, which is the main ingredient, but all the remaining ingredients are soft and simple lemon cookies are a favorite with everyone.


Meltingly Good

Use melted butter for any baked good that needs gentle mixing, such as quick breads, muffins, brownies and even pancakes and waffles. These baked goods rely on baking powder or baking soda for much of their leavening, and don't need creamed butter to rise. Instead, butter's role in these products is to add flavor, color and moisture. To melt butter, place it in a deep microwave-safe bowl and cover it with a lid or paper towel. Heat on high for 30 seconds to one minute.