Traditional recipes

Marion Cunningham's Baking Powder Biscuits and More Recipes

Marion Cunningham's Baking Powder Biscuits and More Recipes

Check out our editors' picks for this week's top food section recipes.

LA Times
Honor Marion Cunningham by baking up her classic baking powder biscuits, instead of buying the gross frozen variety.

NY Times
Ceviche is always in style for summer, especially with tostadas and avocado.

SF Chronicle
Try out trendy arancini balls at home, made with polenta and dipped in aioli.

NPR
Borscht livens up with some ginger and sweet potato.

Chicago Tribune
How to use chips, papers, and planks to smoke your food perfectly.

Seattle Tribune
Host an old-school party with this retro shrimp macaroni salad appetizer.

Kitchen Daily
Whip up some steak béarnaise and jazz it up with some sweet-potato straws to impress your guests.

Portland Press Herald
A perfect galette crust for any pastry needs this summer.

Washington Post
Gorgeous celeriac purée works wonders with a light halibut summer dish.

Wall Street Journal
MasterChef Australia's Adam Liaw shares his death row dish — a Hainanese chicken rice for the soul.


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


A whisk and a spoon

I’ve found that a lot of people shy away from making one type of dough or another. Some people claim, “Oh, I don’t do pie dough,” while others say, “I stay away from yeast.” When my friends at Quirk Books asked me if I wanted to help celebrate the release of their new book, Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg, of course I jumped at the chance. Russell writes the gorgeous blog Chasing Delicious , and that guy can bake . His new book is full of tips and information to make a rainbow of doughs including: scone, biscuit, pie, shortcrust, sweetcrust, choux, brioche, puff, croissant, Danish and phyllo. Whatever your personal dough demon is, you can work through it with this book. Russell gives a master dough recipe for each type (which he explains by using easy ratios) and then several recipes using the various doughs.

For me, biscuits were my dough nemesis until a few years ago, when I worked at a bakery and had to crank out trays of breakfast pastries every morning at 6 am. After all that practice, now I own those suckers! I was super pleased to give Russell’s biscuit dough a try as part of Quirk’s Biscuit Week Challenge. I spied a plum cobbler recipe in his book and couldn’t get the thought out of my head– sweet, soft fruit under a tender, cakey, slightly savory biscuit crust. When I remembered a few Bartlett pears and a bit of homemade butterscotch sauce in the fridge, a light blub went on in my head and I was inspired to make a Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler using up my odds and ends and Russell’s biscuit dough . He’s even put together a video to show step-by-step how to make perfect biscuits. Because the dough is dropped on the fruit here, instead of rolled and cut, a tender cobbler topping is almost guaranteed, even if you think you’re dough-challenged.

The kind folks at Quirk Books sent me a copy of Making Dough , and now I want to send a copy to one of you! Just leave me a comment (one per person, please) on this post before 5:00 pm EST on Tuesday, November 17 and I’ll randomly choose a winner from the list. Be sure your e-mail address is correct so I can contact you if you’re chosen.

Pear and Butterscotch Cobbler– serves 4 to 6
inspired by (and using) a recipe in Making Dough: Recipes and Ratios for Perfect Pastries by Russell van Kraayenburg

Notes: If you don’t already have butterscotch sauce on hand, you can approximate the flavors here with 1/4 cup dark brown sugar, a pinch of salt and 1 tbsp of butter cut into little bits. Toss with the pears and other filling ingredients.

1 1/2 pounds firm-ripe Bartlett or Bosc pears
1 tbsp plus 1 tsp cornstarch
1/2 tsp cinnamon, divided
1 tbsp rum (optional)
1/4 c plus 2 tbsp homemade butterscotch sauce (I used this one )
1/2 recipe of Russell’s prepared biscuit dough
1 tbsp unsalted butter, melted

1
tbsp brown sugar

– Position a rack in the middle of your oven and preheat oven to 400°F.

– Peel and core the pears and cut each into large chunks. In a medium bowl, gently toss the pear chunks with cornstarch and 1/4 tsp of cinnamon. Add the rum, if using, and butterscotch sauce and toss just to coat. (Your butterscotch sauce will work best here if it’s room temperature or barley warm.)

– Turn the fruit mixture into a 1-quart baking dish and bake for 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and keep oven on.

– Pinch off small handful-size clumps (about 2″ in diameter) of the prepared biscuit dough and scatter them on top of the filling so that the clumps touch. Be careful as your baking dish will be hot!

– Lightly brush the biscuit clumps with melted butter (I dabbed with a pastry brush) and sprinkle with the 1 tbsp brown sugar and remaining 1/4 tsp cinnamon.

– Bake for another 20 minutes, until the biscuits are golden and the filling is bubbly. Cool to warm or room temperature before serving.

Please note that the publisher, Quirk Books , sent me a copy of this book.

***Giveaway Winner Update: I used random.org to generate a random comment number to find the winner. Congratulations to Anne! I’ll be in touch soon.***


Watch the video: Buttermilk Crumb Muffins - Marion Cunningham 1 (January 2022).