Traditional recipes

What Exactly Is a Sugar Plum, Anyway?

What Exactly Is a Sugar Plum, Anyway?

Hint: The traditional Christmas sweet isn’t a real plum

What the heck are these things?

Visions of sugar plums may be dancing in children’s heads come Christmastime, but what the heck are they visualizing, exactly? We’ve always pictured sugar plums as some special variety of plum, but in reality that couldn’t be further than the truth.

The sugar plum has evolved a bit over the years, so there are a few different versions out there. The original sugar plums, which date back to the 1600s, were hardened sugar balls surrounding a seed, nut, or spice. Because the sugar layers were added via a technique called panning, the process was very labor-intensive, and the resulting treat was very expensive. In the 1860s, panning was mechanized so the product became much cheaper, although we rarely if ever see them these days. (Panning is the technique used to apply the hard candy shell to everything from M&Ms to Jordan almonds).

In recent years, a couple other versions of sugar plums have emerged. One is popular with home cooks and involves chopping up dried fruit and almonds and combining them with honey and spices including anise, fennel, cardamom, and fennel. The mixture is rolled into balls and then covered in sugar or shredded coconut. Another “sugar plum” variety out there is simply plum-flavored, plum-shaped candy.

And, in case you’re wondering, they’re called “plums” because of the small round shape of the original candies, not because they contain any actual plum.


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Sugar Plums: What Are They?

"'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house, Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there The children were nestled all snug in their beds While visions of sugar-plums danced in their heads."

Most of us have read or heard Clement Clark Moore's famous poem. It's a classic and in my opinion something that should be read each year before Christmas. The poem describes a picturesque Christmas, but I have always wondered what is a sugar-plum? Is it an actual plum coated in sugar? Is it some sort of plum-flavored jelly candy complete with sugar coating? Or is it something completely different? The answer: yes. Read on to find out what I mean.

To understand what I mean, we've got to examine the history of sugar-plum just a little bit. When Moore's poem came out "sugar-plum" was a term that was commonly used to describe comfit. For those of you that don't know what that is, don't worry, I didn't know either, comfits are small items like seeds or nuts that act as a base for sugary candies. Basically, it's the inside of a sugary candy. The term "sugar-plum" also used to mean "something very pleasing or agreeable." So any sort of goodie could technically be a "sugar-plum."

Now that we've explored a tiny bit of the sugar-plum history, I can explain why sugar-plums are sugared plums, flavored candies, and something completely different.

You'd be surprised how many different things pop up when you Google "What is a sugar plum?" One thing that pops up is a recipe from Food Network (click for Sugar-plum Recipe!). This recipe calls for dried plums, apricots, figs, and, of course, sugar. There are also other ingredients that make the sugar plum complete. This is what pops into my mind when I imagine what a sugar plum is. Although I'm not a huge fan of plums, I might be willing to give this recipe a try.

A plum-flavored jelly candy?

Of all the places to find "sugar-plums" the last place I'd think of is the mall. But last Christmas that's exactly where I found them. They looked exactly like the picture above. They tasted good, nothing like a plum, but good. These candies are sold only during the Christmas season and can be difficult to find.

Interestingly enough, sugar-plums, at least the candies with artificial plum flavoring and lots of sugar, were not created after Moore's poem came out.

We've talked about a literal plum that has been sugar-coated, jelly candies, but we haven't talked about the fact that "sugar-plums" can be anything delicious that you like. If we use the old meaning of the word that I mentioned before, "sugar-plum" can be any sweet treat you'd like.

There are a lot of different explanations and answers to what a sugar-plum really is. Whatever the real answer, it's become associated with Christmas and with happy memories. So whether your sugar plum is literal, gummy, or something completely different, I hope visions of sugar-plums dance in your heads!


Watch the video: Secret Agent Sugar Plum, arr. Scott Watson - Score u0026 Sound (December 2021).