Traditional recipes

Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience

Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience

Originally a '57 Fodero Diner, this retro eatery is a great addition to the Minneapolis brunch scene

A salmon Benedict with grilled asparagus and a generous scoop of hollandaise? Sign us up!

After a night out, a Bloody mary and a hearty egg dish is the perfect cure for any hangover. Minneapolis has a growing brunch scene, especially during the summer when folks like to sit out on the porch and indulge in a bottomless mimosa brunch. One of the newer dining options for brunch is Hi-Lo Diner.

Though this diner opened in 2015, it was an original 1957 Fodero Diner, which was actually transported from Gibsonia, Pennsylvania to Minneapolis, Minnesota in order to continue its life as a great American eatery.

During my trip, it was a perfectly sunny day so we voted to dine al fresco. When you first walk in, your eyes are immediately drawn to the glass case of dessert, urging you to check back after your meal for some sweets. They serve all types of pies that range from a creamy lemon meringue to their signature Sweet T, you really can’t go wrong!

We were seated immediately on the porch and began to make the biggest decision of the day ― what to order? One of the best things about Hi-Lo Diner is that its breakfast menu is served all day. We had to try one of the signatures. After a few minutes of debate, I had two options to pick from: the Gary Coop’er and the Lox & Dam Benedict.

One of the diner's specialties are items call Hi-Tops ― a hot, freshly fried dough that is topped with either sweet or savory items. The Gary Coop’er was one of these Hi-Tops, and came with a piece of buttermilk fried chicken and covered in maple-bourbon syrup, country gravy, and micro arugula. My second option was the Lox & Dam Benedict.

I am a sucker for smoked salmon and given that this dish had it piled on top of toasted English muffins with poached eggs, chive, capers, and hollandaise, I was quite torn between which dish to order. Ultimately, I chose to go with the Benedict to keep things light and save some room for dessert!

Hi-Lo’s overall menu is top-notch when it comes to breakfast items, covering the entire spectrum of flavors. The dinner menu has all types of sandwiches and your typical diner-inspired entrées like a chicken pot pie (named the Turnpike Pot Pie) and the Commercial ― a white Cheddar biscuit that is topped with prime rib, gravy, and mashed potatoes. Swoon! They even have late night happy hour with great deals to close off a day. My experience at Hi-Lo was a great one and I am excited to go back to try that Hi-Top!

For more Twin Cities dining and travel news, click here.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Head to Twin Cities' Hi-Lo Diner For a Unique Eating Experience - Recipes

The BBC is reporting that there are 100 things we didn't know last year. While most of the things that we are credited with knowing now like number five on their list, are just curiousities:

"'Nicole Kidman is scared of butterflies. "I jump out of planes, I could be covered in cockroaches, I do all sorts of things, but I just don't like the feel of butterflies' bodies," she says.'''

Some can give you pause to think, take number two for example:

"Mohammed is now one of the 20 most popular names for boys born in England and Wales. " Interestingly, Islam is the second largest religion in France, also.

If you are interested in seeing what made their list the article is here. One that I enjoyed was 19:

"The = sign was invented by 16th Century Welsh mathematician Robert Recorde, who was fed up with writing "is equal to" in his equations. He chose the two lines because "noe 2 thynges can be moare equalle"."'

I wonder if someone didn't know that before 2005, oh well their list is interesting.

Resolutions for 2006

Soon 2006 is going to roll around. It is my resolution to never write 2005 as a date in the new year. This is going to be difficult because at sometime or another I have always written the previous year's date. I have decided to make ten resolutions for the new year. And I am going to post them here for all to check on me.

1. I resolve to be kind to others. To treat people with respect to call them Sir and Miss even if they are younger than me. (not hard I do that already)

2. I resolve to help anyone I see in distress even if it is an inconvenience to me. And if I can assist someone who needs help, I will. (this is really easy to do, and the reward is self serving, more pleasurable than ice cream)

3. I resolve to always tell the truth as I see it. (Again this is easier than it seems. The only times I am tempted to lie is not to hurt someone elses feelings. When I am tempted I refrain from saying anything at all) The truth has served me well in life even when I had to admit that I was wrong in doing something.

4. I will volunteer time for causes to help others. (This will be more difficult for me, I will have to find a venue that helps me remain anonymous)

5. I resolve to travel more, to see new places, and revisit some old places.

6. I resolve to find value in all people, no matter what there station is in life. And try to learn from what they have to offer even if I do not agree with their ideas.

7. I resolve to help others find the value in giving, which is more rewarding than the receiving.

8. I resolve to know that there are things that I cannot understand about people. I do not understand the reason of some actions, and realize that people form their thoughts different than I do.

9. I resolve to notice things that skip my attention at times. The small details that make up the whole. I will look beyond some of the ugliness I see, and focus on the beauty that surrounds in nature.

10. I plan to be kinder to myself. To invent the better pizza, I make for myself. To indulge myself with pleasures that I have previously denied myself. And to share what I find enjoyable with others.

The hardest resolution I made was in the introduction. To break the force of habit of writing 2005, change can be hard, no matter what your resolution.

Lads and Lassies, Do ye ken the real words to Auld Lang Syne?

Every New Year's Eve, people all over the country try to sing this song and louse it up pretty badly. Most simply do not know the words, or do not know the correct pronunciation, etc

The Scottish blood in my veins will not satisifed if I don't try to help this in some fashion. I will be talking more about the author of this song, Scotland's National Poet, Robert Burns, later in January, but for now. here are the complete words to Auld Lang Syne. Learn them and amaze your friends and family.

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind?
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne!

Chorus:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
For auld lang syne.
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

And surely ye'll be your pint stowp!
And surely I'll be mine!
And we'll tak a cup o'kindness yet,
For auld lang syne.

We twa hae run about the braes,
And pou'd the gowans fine
But we've wander'd mony a weary fit,
Sin' auld lang syne.

We twa hae paidl'd in the burn,
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar'd
Sin' auld lang syne.

And there's a hand, my trusty fiere!
And gie's a hand o' thine!
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught,
For auld lang syne.

auld lang syne - times gone by
be - pay for
braes - hills
braid - broad
burn - stream
dine - dinner time
fiere - friend
fit - foot
gowans - daisies
guid-willie waught - goodwill drink
monie - many
morning sun - noon
paidl't - paddled
pint-stowp - pint tankard
pou'd - pulled
twa - two

And in a related note. Hangover cures. they aren't

Revelers toasting to the holidays can't count on drugs or herbal concoctions to cure their hangovers, British researchers report.

"No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover," concludes a team led by Max Pittler, a research fellow in Complementary Medicine at Peninsula Medical School, Universities of Exeter and Plymouth.

Their less-than-inspiring advice? Practice either abstinence or moderation when the glasses are being filled.

A second study may provide some help with moderation: It found that people tend to consume a smaller amount of liquor from tall, skinny glasses than from short, squat ones — even when the two receptacles are designed to hold the same amount of liquid.

Both reports appear in the Dec. 24/31 issue of the British Medical Journal.

In the first study, Pittler's team gathered data from eight trials that looked at medical treatment for preventing or treating hangovers.

The trials tested eight different agents: propranolol (an antihypertensive drug), tropisetron (a drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (a painkiller), fructose or glucose sugars, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear.

Most of these trials found no beneficial effects for these agents on hangover, although borage, a yeast-based preparation, and tolfenamic acid did show some benefit.

Drinking may be fun for a while, but it comes with a price that may be unavoidable, one expert said.

"The supply of folklore remedies for hangover is virtually limitless," said Dr. David L. Katz, director of the Prevention Research Center at Yale University School of Medicine. "The best way to contend with hangover is not to get one, by practicing abstinence or moderation."

However, many rational approaches to avoiding or reversing hangover have simply not been formally tested, Katz said. "There is some evidence that dehydration is part of the hangover syndrome, so drinking plenty of non-alcoholic beverages, particularly water, before, during and after a holiday indulgence may help."

"In addition, spacing out alcohol consumption will allow your body's enzymes a better chance to keep up, and likely reduce toxic side effects," Katz said. "A simple strategy to accomplish both is to alternate alcoholic beverages with something like seltzer."

Another study in the same journal finds the shape of the glass helps determine the size of the drink.

A research team led by Brian Wansink, chairman of marketing and applied economics at Cornell University, and his colleagues found that people pour 20 percent to 30 percent more alcohol into short, wide glasses than they do into tall, narrow ones of the same volume.

However, they believe that tall glasses hold more, Wansink said. Even professional bartenders pour more into short, wide glasses than into highball glasses, they found.

"If a person wants to limit how much they consume, it's better if you pour into a tall, skinny glass," Wansink said. "If as a host you want to limit what people drink, you better use tall, skinny glasses. You will be less likely to pour too much," he added

Good Luck Around the World

Yellow underwear, broken china, eating lasagna — all are good luck traditions to ring in the new year, but before you break plates and hit Victoria's Secret, familiarize yourself with where in the world to go to share the luck in 2006. Around the globe, people celebrate the coming of a new year with traditions specific to their country. Although the celebrations are not always held on the same day, they often include religious ceremonies, costume parties, parades, and good luck charms said to bring fortune, luck and love in the new year.

Tradition Around the World

- Venezuela:
Wear yellow underwear for good luck. Venezuelans also write wishes in a letter and burn it so they come true.

- Brazil:
Jump seven ocean waves and your wishes may come true. Citizens of Rio de Janeiro also throw flowers into the water as an offering to the Goddess of the Seas.

- Mexico:
Eat 12 grapes and make 12 wishes (one for each gong on the clock at midnight.) And if you're looking for love, Mexicans opt for red underwear.

- Ecuador:
To forget the old year, people create a dummy and stuff it with old newspapers and firecrackers. At midnight, each family lights the dummy on fire and as it goes up in smoke, the firecrackers also go off to add to the festivities.

- South America:
On New Year's Day, most people make a habit of eating black-eyed peas and turnip greens (to bring good fortune and plenty of money.)

- Lithuania:
Single women put 12 men's names on slips of paper, plus one blank slip of paper under the pillow. When they wake up the following morning, they select one of the slips of paper, which means that is the person they will marry.

- Sicily, Italy:
Eating pasta in Italy doesn't sound very unusual, but Sicilians always ring in the new year with a plate of lasagna for good luck.

- England:
The first visitor on New Year's Day will bring you luck — good or bad.

- Denmark:
Danes horde old plates to throw at friends' houses. They believe that broken china means more friends.

- France:
There's a fair amount of champagne drinking and screaming on New Year's Eve, but for many French people the new year officially begins by eating king cake, "Galette des Rois," on the holiday known as Epiphany. Epiphany, which celebrates the arrival of the Three Kings to pay homage to Baby Jesus, is honored in most parts of France on the first Sunday of January. The almond-paste round cake is cut into pieces and distributed by a child hiding under the table. Whoever finds "la fève" — the charm hidden inside — is king or queen for the day and can choose a partner.

- Vancouver, British Columbia:
Take a dip in the English Bay with the Polar Bear Club to wash the year's sins away.

- Japan:
On New Year's Eve, bells are rung 108 times to chase away 108 troubles. The Japanese all laugh after the gongs because it's believed that sharing a chuckle will drive away the bad spirits.

- China:
The Chinese New Year (slated for Jan. 29, 2006) is the first day of the lunar calendar, so it is also called the Lunar New Year. This holiday trumps all other holidays in China, and the festivities last 15 days. New Year Eve's dinner has lots of symbolic meaning. Eating dumplings implies wealth because they have the shape of ancient Chinese gold or silver ingots. Everyone, even kids, drinks a little liquor, which is a symbol of longevity. People also give each other red envelopes with money in it, a symbol of luck and wealth.

- United States:
Wild cheers at the stroke of midnight is believed to ward off evil spirits. Chase the bad away and ring in the new! Kissing your loved one ensures that friendly ties will grace you and the person for the next 12 months.


Watch the video: ЭМОЦИИ ПРОСТО НЕВОЗМОЖНО СДЕРЖАТЬ! Какой Она Была. A VOICE FROM THE PAST - ENGLISH SUBTITLES (December 2021).