Traditional recipes

Meatball-Stuffed Cabbage Leaves

Meatball-Stuffed Cabbage Leaves

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil over high heat and set up an ice bath. Blanch the cabbage leaves until just wilted, transfer to the ice bath, and drain. Set aside.

Meanwhile, in a large mixing bowl, combine the ground beef, ground veal, egg, breadcrumbs, onion, garlic, parsley, and cheese and mix until smooth. Form into 12 small patties with your hand. Stuff the cabbage leaves with the meat patties and make sure they are completely enclosed.

Heat about 1-inch olive oil in a deep-sided, ovensafe sauté pan over medium heat. When hot, add the meatballs and fry for 1 minute on each side. Transfer to the oven and bake for 5 minutes. Then, remove the meatballs from the pan and drain the oil. Reserve the pan for making the sauce.


Stuffed cabbage with freekeh meatballs

Preheat the oven to 180º C. Grease an overproof baking dish with butter.

Place all the ingredients for the meatball stuffing in a large bowl and work together until well combined.

Roll into evenly sized portions, cover and chill to firm up while you prepare the cabbage leaves.

Cut off the core end of the cabbages and carefully separate the leaves. Rinse thoroughly to remove any grit.

Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil and blanche the cabbage leaves for several minutes.

Remove with a slotted spoon and blot to dry on a clean kitchen towel. Remove the tough centre rib from the larger leaves.

Place a meatball in the centre of the cabbage leaf, fold over the outer sides and roll into parcels.

Pack the finished parcels snugly next to each other in the baking dish.

Whisk together the tomato passata, sugar and stock and season lightly with salt and pepper.

Pour the liquid over the cabbage parcels and drizzle with olive oil.

Cover the dish with foil and roast in the oven for 45-50 minutes or until the meat is cooked through.

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Stuffed Cabbage with Freekeh Meatballs recipe

500g free-range beef mince
½ cup fresh breadcrumbs
¾ cup cooked freekeh (cracked or whole wheat)
1 large free-range egg
¾ teaspoon sea salt
freshly cracked black pepper
1 teaspoon ground coriander
pinch of nutmeg
zest of half a lemon

2 medium-sized savoy cabbages
125ml (1/2 cup) tomato passata
½ teaspoon sugar
½ cup chicken stock
2 tablespoons olive oil
salt and black pepper, to taste
Mash:
4 potatoes, peeled and cubed
1 clove garlic, crushed
About 30 ml warm milk
45 ml butter or margarine
15 ml chopped fresh mint
15 ml chopped fresh coriander
60 ml grated Cheddar cheese
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

How to
Preheat the oven to 180º C. Grease an overproof baking dish with butter.

Place all the ingredients for the meatball stuffing in a large bowl and work together until well combined.

Roll into evenly sized portions, cover and chill to firm up while you prepare the cabbage leaves.

Cut off the core end of the cabbages and carefully separate the leaves. Rinse thoroughly to remove any grit.

Bring a large pan of salted water to the boil and blanche the cabbage leaves for several minutes.

Remove with a slotted spoon and blot to dry on a clean kitchen towel. Remove the tough centre rib from the larger leaves.

Place a meatball in the centre of the cabbage leaf, fold over the outer sides and roll into parcels.

Pack the finished parcels snugly next to each other in the baking dish.

Whisk together the tomato passata, sugar and stock and season lightly with salt and pepper.

Pour the liquid over the cabbage parcels and drizzle with olive oil.

Cover the dish with foil and roast in the oven for 45-50 minutes or until the meat is cooked through.


Stuffed Cabbage Leaves Gołąbki

Revisiting one of my first posts for Stuffed Cabbage Leaves, Golabki in Polish. These little bundles of ground beef and rice, wrapped in cabbage and topped in a rich tomato sauce are named after pigeons!

My first exposure to this dish was with Ed’s family. Their part of Pennsylvania is an ethnic and culinary mosaic, as in all of Europe comes to the New World. When my mother and her sister would cook a big meal for our combined families in Arizona, they would have made a big pan of enchiladas.

For my PA in-laws, it would be a roaster full of stuffed cabbage. We could always count on there being cabbage rolls to greet us when we visited. It was the sign of a special occasion.

Love Polish food? Checkout my Cookbook!

I fixed this for Ed and one of his colleagues as they prepared to make the initial trip to Poland. We talked with excitement about the travel arrangements, what it might be like, the plans for apartment hunting.

We had pierogi with the stuffed cabbage. I’m embarrassed to say the pierogi were frozen I had yet to make my first pierogi back then. Things have changed! I make a pretty good pierogi ruskie now.

Novice that I was at the time with Polish cuisine, I still stand by this recipe for Stuffed Cabbage Leaves. I wouldn’t change a thing.

Lois
Adapted from Better Homes and Gardens Heritage Cookbook


Stuffed cabbage with freekeh meatballs

Stuffed cabbage, often referred to as ‘Oumens or oumas onder komberse’, is given a healthy makeover with the addition of current ‘it’ grain, freekeh. Slow-baked in a light tomato sauce until the meat is succulently tender, this is comfort food with benefits.

Made famous by the Cape Malay community, there are more recipes for stuffed cabbage than you can shake a stick at. Usually dotted with butter and braised in a simple stock, I’ve chosen to cook the cabbage parcels in a tomato sauce. The resulting pan juices are somewhere between a tangy sauce and a spoonable gravy.

Meatballs have a tendency to be rather dense and so I almost always add fresh breadcrumbs to the mix. It makes all the difference. A quick word on Freekeh. This wholesome grain is gaining huge popularity amongst chefs and health-consious food enthusiasts. Freekeh wheat is harvested unripened and then roasted, a process which imparts an almost smoked nutty taste with a toothsome bite. You can choose between cracked wheat freekeh, which is not dissimilar to the texture of bulgur wheat, or a whole grain version. Either option will taste the same, although the cracked wheat combines more easily with the meat for this recipe. Buy freekeh online from TRIFC or Wellness Warehouse.

For the parcels, I’ve used savoy cabbages. I love the graduated shades of the ruffled green leaves. You can of course use any cabbage if you can’t find savoy. Blanching the leaves is essential, making them manageable and easy to roll. Once this step is out the way, it’s plain sailing to wrap and roll these meaty packages. Serve the stuffed cabbage with a side of butterbean mash and warm, crusty bread.


Stuffed Cabbage Rolls

Unstuffed Cabbage Roll Skillet – Tastes just like cabbage rolls, but this unstuffed cabbage roll skillet is done in no time and perfect for weeknight meals!

How does your family feel about cabbage? My buddy, Brandi, from Aunt Bee’s Recipes, has a recipe for Southern Fried Cabbage that her family loves, and it’s become a regular internet sensation – one of her top posts of all times.

These cabbage rolls do take a little bit of time, but they are so worth it! Super tasty, and a pretty presentation that is also an economical meal.

I cut the bottom off of the head of cabbage and drop it in a pot of boiling water to help the leaves separate easier. I used to try to take them off of the uncooked head, and it seemed they always ripped on me. As I am making my meatballs, I take each leaf off, as they loosen in the pot, with a set of tongs. Be carful — they are hot!

Place the prepared meatball at the bottom of the leaf (where the stem would be) fold the sides inward, and roll from the bottom up. Place seam side down in a baking dish.

Pour tomato sauce over the top of the rolls, cover and bake for about 90 minutes.

Dinner is served. No need for anything else ..it’s all right here, all in one pot!

Let’s make some cabbage rolls!


Poor Man&rsquos Stuffed Cabbage

Ok So I admit, as I have a few times here on Seduction in the Kitchen, obsessed with frozen pre-made meatballs. I have created: Cherry Spiced Meatballs, Slow Cooker Meatball Ranch Stroganoff, and Slow Cooker Meatball Stew. I like using them in ways you would not think of obviously. Also because they are quick and easy to use as well.

Stuffed cabbage was something I was really craving. It was cold and I wanted to do my usual weekend throw it in the slow cooker type of thing. However, I was feeling lazy. It was that type of day where I really didn&rsquot want to do anything.

I had the frozen meatballs, my brain started thinking. What if I wrapped the cabbage around the meatballs and then into the sauce would it work? Yes and no. It would not hold together.

So, how about just throwing everything into the slow cooker and see what happens? that was what I did. It was deconstructed stuffed cabbage, but it was so good. Looking at it, I decided. Poot Man&rsquos Stuffed cabbage was the perfect name.

Why? Well because of it also a great meal when you have not much in the cupboards. You throw what you have in the slow cooker and see what comes out. That was what I did. What came out was a very tasty dinner.


Can You Eat the Outer Leaves of Cabbage?

A lot of people may be guilty of throwing the outer cabbage leaves, thinking that they are dirty or inedible.

But that actually isn’t the case! Did you know that the outer cabbage leaves are powerful sources of vitamins A, B, and C? It’s completely safe to eat the outer leaves of cabbages, as all leaves are edible.

And no, you won’t have to worry about the outer leaves tasting like bugs or whatever you have added to your soil or plants. While you may have found holes on some of the cabbage leaves, there is no harm in consuming them, provided they were cleaned, stored, and prepared properly.

Be sure that you rinse your cabbage leaves well before preparing to cook or consume them to ensure that there are no insects or insect remnants left. However, if the leaves look extremely wilted and dark, it may be best to throw them out or use them as compost.

With that in mind, there are many things you can do with the outer cabbage leaves, such as fermenting them to make kimchi, creating a stir-fry, or even cabbage chips and cabbage rolls! There are numerous recipes you can use outer cabbage leaves with, whether raw or cooked.

Besides the outer cabbage leaves, there are also parts of the cabbage plant that is edible, such as the branched underground compressed stem, which is the rhizome. The enlarged hypocotyl is completely edible and can be harvested to consume, so you get to take advantage of your cabbage plant!

Do you want to learn more about harvesting cabbage and the uses of your produce? Check out this informative video:


Inside-Out Stuffed Cabbage Meatballs

1. In a large skillet, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the cabbage and 1/4 cup water and cook, stirring frequently, until wilted, about 5 minutes. Stir in the maple syrup and 1 teaspoon caraway seeds season with salt and pepper. Lower the heat to medium-low, cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the cabbage is tender, about 5 minutes. Transfer 1 cup cabbage to a bowl and let sit until slightly cooled.

2. Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine the meatloaf mix, breadcrumbs, egg, allspice and remaining 2 teaspoons caraway seeds. Divide the mixture into 12 mounds. Hold 1 mound in your hand and press a heaping teaspoon of the cooled cabbage into the center shape the meat around the cabbage to form a meatball. Repeat with the remaining meat and cooled cabbage.

3. Add 1 cup water to the cabbage in the skillet nestle the meatballs in the cabbage. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, cover and cook, turning the meatballs once, until cooked through, 15 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Serve the meatballs on the cabbage, along with the cranberry sauce.


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