Traditional recipes

Beer Review: Timothy Taylor Landlord

Beer Review: Timothy Taylor Landlord

The English pale ale is easy drinking for Labor Day

The Timothy Taylor Landlord is a refreshing English pale ale.

Craft beer imports are a quickly growing market. craft labels available, the job of the importer is to find new delectable rarities to offer. Shelton Brothers of Belchertown, Mass., has spent nearly two decades bringing worldly brews to American shores. A new beer on the roster is Timothy Taylor Landlord, a highly regarded, award-winning English pale ale brewed in West Yorkshire, U.K. Timothy Taylor has been brewing beer since 1858 and was one of the first breweries Shelton Brothers approached when they began importing in the late 1990s.

Poured from a tall, 16.9-ounce bottle, Landlord appears coppery clear with an attractive white head. The nose presents a welcoming touch of hops coupled by a strong, bready malt base. As opposed to American pale ales, British pale ales slant toward accessible flavors and low alcohol content.

True to style, this brew is one of the easiest drinking and most flavorful English style pale ales we’ve tried. Bready malts first found in the nose play nicely on the palate, next to light hops and a subtly sweet malt character. Though full bodied, Landlord is very light and clean tasting, leaving a delightfully crisp finish. Coming it at a low 4.1 percent ABV, Landlord is a perfect candidate for a night out or long, weekend afternoon — it’s a true session beer.

That Shelton Brothers waited nearly 15 years to import Timothy Taylor Landlord to American soil should be enough to pique any brewhead’s interest. The company has distributors in all 50 states, so it should not be too tough to get your hands on a bottle. Once tried, this highly drinkable English pale ale is worth coming back to again and again.

— Danya Henninger, The Drink Nation

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Landlord Timothy Taylor's Brewery

Protips: Explain why you're giving this rating. Your review must discuss the beer's attributes (look, smell, taste, feel) and your overall impression in order to indicate that you have legitimately tried the beer. Nonconstructive reviews may be removed without notice and action may be taken on your account.

Help Us Be Awesome

4.25 /5 rDev +3.4%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4.25

Serving: Bottle
Best before: Aug-2020 (Consumed Sep-29)


It pours clear and gold with a couple fingers of beige head. Good retention, okay lacing. The aroma is bread crust, light orange peel character, simple earthy hop bite. The flavor follows suit with a slight lingering bitterness, and I do mean slight. A nice effervescence gives it a little crispness, medium body, lingering malt finish. This is a very nice beer with a good balance between golden promise malt and some hoppy fruitiness/zip. It practically drinks itself and I don't know really know what more to say. It strikes me as kind of a semi-APA-ified, crispified version of a bitter or something. It is definitely a little assertive on the hop side with a pleasant fizzy bite to keep it more refreshing than it is filling. Very nice!


EDIT:
Got to try this one on cask as well a few days after my initial review of the bottle and while it is obviously the same beer I was pretty surprised at how much different it tasted. The look was similar. But the rest was mellower, richer, rounder and generally better with less of a bite. While I was a little surprised at the slight bite in the bottle the cask one was hoppy without being biting and the lower carb really affected it in this way too. The rating on here (and below) is for the cask version since that is obviously how it is meant to be drunk, but I've left my bottle scores and impressions (above) for posterity. Interestingly, I felt the that feel was about equal in both, but I really feel like the difference in feel is most of what accounted for the perceived differences in the beers, so make of that what you will. This may have been the single most educational beer in my life as far as understanding perceptions and the importance of carbonic acid goes.

3.4 /5 rDev -17.3%
look: 4 | smell: 3.25 | taste: 3.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 3.25

Pours a dull, hazy burnt orange with a loose, half inch, off-white head that gradually settles into a soapy froth. Nose is biscuity, with a hint of spice and a wet cardboard skunk. There’s also a suggestion of something sweet - perhaps honey. Taste consistent with nose with a trace of something metallic towards the back. Mouthfeel is light in body with an assertive carbonation that prickles the back of the throat between quaffs. Overall, not sure if this beer’s past it’s prime. It’s not bad, but definitely has some qualities that suggest it may be old.

4.12 /5 rDev +0.2%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 5 | overall: 4


Landlord Timothy Taylor's Brewery

Protips: Explain why you're giving this rating. Your review must discuss the beer's attributes (look, smell, taste, feel) and your overall impression in order to indicate that you have legitimately tried the beer. Nonconstructive reviews may be removed without notice and action may be taken on your account.

Help Us Be Awesome

4.02 /5 rDev -2.2%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 4 | overall: 4

a: dark amber color. had on cask so no head as i drink

s: caramel, strawberry, and a touch of noble-like hops

t: just like the aroma. Caramel and a nice smooth (but faint) earthy hop taste

m: light mouthfeel, no carbonation (had on cask)

o: solid and sessionable. light, but has a nice flavor to it

3.4 /5 rDev -17.3%
look: 4 | smell: 3.25 | taste: 3.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 3.25

Pours a dull, hazy burnt orange with a loose, half inch, off-white head that gradually settles into a soapy froth. Nose is biscuity, with a hint of spice and a wet cardboard skunk. There’s also a suggestion of something sweet - perhaps honey. Taste consistent with nose with a trace of something metallic towards the back. Mouthfeel is light in body with an assertive carbonation that prickles the back of the throat between quaffs. Overall, not sure if this beer’s past it’s prime. It’s not bad, but definitely has some qualities that suggest it may be old.

4.12 /5 rDev +0.2%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 5 | overall: 4

My 2000th review. Bottle. Beer that has always intrigued me and randomly found on a shelf, fresh from across the pond. Landlord pours a clear, deep orange. Attractive, tan head. Very lacy. British yeast, which smells of apples. Caramel, toffee, biscuit malt. Floral hops and just a bit of sweet citrus hops, along with woody hops. The flavor is all of the nose but less sweet and more to my liking. More bitter than I was anticipating. Woody, slightly citrusy and grassy hops. Bakery-medley malt with caramel additions. Fruity and apple-dominated yeast. Gets better as it warms because a good Brit beer isn't served cold. Far more body than a beer of such light alcohol should be able to possess. Massaging bubbles. Landlord makes me want to shout "ALE" in a British accent. This is a definitive U.K. ale to me. Cheers to my #2000 this was a cool beer for the liquid inauguration.

bmaslakov from Russian Federation

4.12 /5 rDev +0.2%
look: 4.5 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 3.75 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4.5

Pours very clear reddish straw body with a small white head. Chamomile, meadow flowers, and fresh cut grass are nicely supported by some lightest honey. Taste is simple and enjoyable, mildly bitter, with good hops balance. Really nice one.

4.72 /5 rDev +14.8%
look: 4.5 | smell: 5 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 5

S: Caramel malts and a slight hop presence. but mainly that beautiful caramel shines through on the nose
T: Beautiful malt character shone through with just a restrained hop flavour and mild bitterness.
M: Medium mouthfeel, low to medium carbonation and finishes dry
D: After drinking not much else but APAs and IPAs it was a refreshing change and the catalyst to start tasting some malt driven beers. Could see a few of these going down quickly in a session. Nothing too much in your face. just really well balanced. something i'm keen to continue to experience.

4.27 /5 rDev +3.9%
look: 3.5 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4 | overall: 4.5

3.99 /5 rDev -2.9%
look: 3.75 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 4 | overall: 4

Poured into an English pint glass, the appearance was a burnt orange/copper color with a finger’s worth of white foamy head that slid off fairly quick. Stringy soapy lace. The aroma had some estery sweet floral hops over top of buttered biscuits, somewhat cracker-like/touch of herbal. The flavor was moderately sweet pulling the malts in front to even the keel of the overall taste surrounding the hops. Aftertaste was quaint, somewhat malty, buttery and soapy. Finish was quick and malty. The palate was between light and medium bodied with a fair sessionability about it. Carbonation felt low but expected. ABV felt good. Overall, pretty good bitter with the diacetyl controlled enough to not be distracting. Probably be a good one for Americans to give a shit before delving into the world of Bitters.

4.09 /5 rDev -0.5%
look: 4 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4

3.98 /5 rDev -3.2%
look: 4 | smell: 3.5 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4 | overall: 4

Wattsox from Northern Ireland

4.42 /5 rDev +7.5%
look: 4 | smell: 4.5 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4 | overall: 4.5

500ml bottle, consumed Jun 2011, BBE Feb 2012.

A - Clear copper body with a fairly tightly-bubbled head that dissipates fairly quickly, leaving a thinner creamy head and cling.

S - A fairly balanced aroma of yeast, malt and hops the quintessentially English ale aroma.

T - Sweet biscuity malt takes the lead on the taste with fruit notes following, but not sweet. Finishes with a bitter hit on the end that begs for another sip.

M - Medium body, medium carbonation, smooth with a briefly lingering bitter finish.

O - Overall, this is an outstanding beer which is low enough in alcohol (4.1% ABV) to work perfectly as a session beer, or even on its own.

4.38 /5 rDev +6.6%
look: 4.5 | smell: 4 | taste: 4.5 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5

Just an amazing beer of the type, light hops, good malt balance.

4.39 /5 rDev +6.8%
look: 4.25 | smell: 4.5 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5

4.54 /5 rDev +10.5%
look: 4.5 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.75 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5

beautiful British ale with unexpected hop highlights. Expensive, but very enjoyable.

4.15 /5 rDev +1%
look: 4 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 4.5

A - creamy white head, reddish amber body, sheet lacing.

S - I get straw from a damp stable and a faint maple syrup

T - malt, toffee and honey, quite sweet at first fading to a nice bitter finish.

M - very smooth medium body, moderate carbonation

D - a terrific English style PA that provides full flavour at 4.1%abv. Great session beer.

4 /5 rDev -2.7%
look: 4 | smell: 4 | taste: 4 | feel: 4 | overall: 4

4.21 /5 rDev +2.4%
look: 4 | smell: 4.25 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4 | overall: 4.25

Bottle code but no date
Pours a medium-low frothy bubbly head with medium retention, little lacing, clear deep gold slight amber color

Nose brings mostly English herbal floral fruity hops, light sweet malt and caramel notes, grainy toasty notes, fruity esters

Taste sweet grainy malt out front, mild sweetness, some caramel and toasted grain, good balance as medium hop bitterness kicks in, moderate herbal floral hops, black tea, iced tea, some fruity esters, bitterness starts lighter and increases to medium on the finish which is a bit sweet

Mouth is med bod, medium to higher carb which is a little high for the style

Overall pretty solid English pale, good hops, nice malts, great balance, little too much carb but that's ok, enjoyable

4.07 /5 rDev -1%
look: 4 | smell: 4.5 | taste: 4 | feel: 4.5 | overall: 3.5

The more I drink English Pale Ales the more I become enamoured with their relative simplicity and charm. It is as such that I found Timothy Taylor and his smiling Landlord holding a pewter tankard of what one can only assume to be the fine beverage, and I hope to be as happy as that Landlord soon enough.

Poured from a 500ml bottle into a nonic pint.

A: This one presents itself with a clear amber body and a 1cm off-white head that stands fairly well, don't often see head on an EPA, it's a nice change of pace.

S: Floral hops, reminiscent of Fuggles if I'm not mistaken, abound with a mix of biscuit and caramel malts and an almost bread-like yeast thrown in for good measure.

T: Sweet upfront, slight buttery diacetyl with a chewy caramel malt middle followed by floral hops. Big flavours (as long as you drink it at the temperature prescribed on the back of the bottle) for what is essentially a mid-strength, in Australia anyway, beer. The malts begin to steal the show from the hops as it warms so bear that in mind.

M: Medium bodied with light carbonation, as a good EPA should be.

D: Calling it a "Strong Pale Ale" might garner some negative reaction from boutique beer drinking quarters, however one thing to remember is that compared to most EPA's this is strong in flavour. It's certainly not as subtle as many pull tap ales I've had in the UK, so in that respect "Strong Pale Ale" is befitting of this brew. The only points I would deduct is cost, again there are UK breweries that do decent (if not better) ales at a lower cost, e.g. Harviestoun and Hook Norton are two off the top of my head, otherwise a great EPA here.

Food match: This beer makes me think of the traditional English roast pork with gravy, crackling, Yorkshire pudding, peas and roast vegetables.

4.05 /5 rDev -1.5%
look: 3.75 | smell: 3.75 | taste: 4.25 | feel: 4.25 | overall: 4


Beer Review: Timothy Taylor Landlord

Craft beer imports are a quickly growing market. With so many different U.S. craft labels available, he job of the importer is to find new delectable rarities to offer. Shelton Brothers of Belchertown, MA has spent nearly two decades bringing worldly brews to American shores. A new beer in the roster is Timothy Taylor Landlord, a highly regarded, award-winning English pale ale brewed in West Yorkshire, UK. Timothy Taylor has been brewing beer since 1858 and was one of the first breweries Shelton Brothers approached when they began importing in the late 1990s.

Poured from a tall, 16.9-oz. bottle, Landlord appears coppery clear with an attractive white head. The nose presents a welcoming touch of hops coupled by a strong, bready malt base. As opposed to American pale ales, British pale ales slant toward accessible flavors and low alcohol content.

True to style, this brew is one of the easiest drinking and most flavorful English style pale ales we&rsquove tried. Bready malts first found in the nose play nicely on the palate, next to light hops and a subtly sweet malt character. Though full bodied, Landlord is very light and clean tasting, leaving a delightfully crisp finish. Coming it at a low 4.1% ABV, Landlord is a perfect candidate for a night out or long, weekend afternoon &mdash it&rsquos a true session beer.


Beer Review: Timothy Taylor Landlord - Recipes

by drsmurto » Wednesday Apr 16, 2008 3:45 pm

Tapped this on the weekend, my 3rd attempt at nailing a Timothy Taylor Landlord clone.

Mach 1 was 98% MO, 2% JW caramalt - not bad but not malty enough
Mach 2 was 94% Mo, 6% melandoidin - very hoppy, melanoidin is out of whack

Hopping schedule has been the same for all. Mach 1 used wyeast 1098 and since then i have been using the supposed Timothy Taylor yeast - 1469.

Here is Mach 3 - the best of the lot. Malt is there, hops are not as in your face as Mach 2. Balanced. At last. Lighter in colour than the real thing but i dont care!

3.75 kg Pale Malt, Maris Otter (5.9 EBC) Grain 92.59 %
0.30 kg Munich I (Weyermann) (14.0 EBC) Grain 7.41 %
45.00 gm Fuggles [4.40 %] (60 min) Hops 25.2 IBU
30.00 gm Goldings, East Kent [4.50 %] (20 min) Hops 10.4 IBU
30.00 gm Styrian Goldings [4.70 %] (20 min) (Aroma Hop-Steep) Hops -
0.50 items Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 15.0 min) Misc
1 Pkgs TTL (Wyeast #1469) [Starter 2000 ml] Yeast-Ale

20L - OG 1.044, IBU 35.6, EBC 9.6

Mashed in at 65, mash out 78.

This one is now my house ale. Can drink it all year round!

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by rwh » Wednesday Apr 16, 2008 3:54 pm

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by Trough Lolly » Wednesday Apr 16, 2008 4:17 pm

Wheeler, G and Protz, R, 1998, Brew Your Own British Real Ale, CAMRA Ltd, p.145.
Timothy Taylor Landlord

A superb beer of enormous character and complexity, from the Knowle Spring brewery in Keighley. Stunning, mouth-filling, multi-layered interweaving of malt and hop with intense hop and fruit finish.

4280g Golden Promise pale malt

39g EK Goldings hops (7.9% A/A) at start of boil
32g Fuggles hops (4.5%) at start of boil
15g (Styrian) Goldings hops (5.3%) at 15 mins
Irish moss at 15 mins

Mash at 66C for 90 mins. Boil time 90 mins. Racking gravity 1009, 2.3 degrees Plato.
4.4% abv, 35 IBU, 10 EBC, 6 SRM.

Cheers,
TL
(I can also source Timothy Taylor Best Bitter if req'd. )

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by Chris » Wednesday Apr 16, 2008 8:26 pm

A beer in the hand is worth two in George Bush.

"They say beer will make me dumb. It are go good with pizza"
Psychostick

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by Ross » Wednesday Apr 16, 2008 9:41 pm

Trough Lolly wrote:

Wheeler, G and Protz, R, 1998, Brew Your Own British Real Ale, CAMRA Ltd, p.145.
Timothy Taylor Landlord

A superb beer of enormous character and complexity, from the Knowle Spring brewery in Keighley. Stunning, mouth-filling, multi-layered interweaving of malt and hop with intense hop and fruit finish.

4280g Golden Promise pale malt

39g EK Goldings hops (7.9% A/A) at start of boil
32g Fuggles hops (4.5%) at start of boil
15g (Styrian) Goldings hops (5.3%) at 15 mins
Irish moss at 15 mins

Mash at 66C for 90 mins. Boil time 90 mins. Racking gravity 1009, 2.3 degrees Plato.
4.4% abv, 35 IBU, 10 EBC, 6 SRM.

Cheers,
TL
(I can also source Timothy Taylor Best Bitter if req'd. )

They might use 100% GP, but i reckon some of it is crystal. the above recipe does not come up like TTL colour alone is way too pale & 15gms @ 15mins of Styrian is not going to give you the wonderful TTl aroma. Have you tried it TL?

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by drsmurto » Thursday Apr 17, 2008 11:04 am

Saw that recipe floating around TL but after discussing the recipe with many TTL fans the hop schedule i used was deemed more appropriate. As Ross said, you need a big styrians aroma and thats what i get. 1.5g/L at flameout seemed a little excessive to me but the aroma is magic.

Floor malted GP isnt available here so after discussing the recipe with Wessmith he suggested i bump up the maltiness with some munich and not worry too much about the colour.

Took his advice and its a dead set winner. The bottles of TTL i bought recently were oxidised so couldnt do a side by side comparison but to be honest, i am not that worried. It tastes sensational and i achieved one of my goals - to brew a bloody nice ESB. Will stick to this recipe and play around with others hops/malts/yeasts etc to make other ESBs.

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by rwh » Thursday Apr 17, 2008 11:18 am

Oh, right you already knew that.

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by warra48 » Thursday Apr 17, 2008 5:15 pm

drsmurto wrote:
Damn i love english ales!

What's not to love? She's a beauty of the first order.
And I love American Pale Ales, Märzens, Porters, etc etc etc, aawwww geez, I just love beer.

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by Brewaholic » Thursday Apr 17, 2008 10:07 pm

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by tazman67 » Friday Apr 18, 2008 12:53 am

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by Trough Lolly » Monday Apr 21, 2008 1:59 pm

G'day Ross,
No, I haven't brewed this exact recipe - I have an essex ale recipe that does use Bairds Amber Ale malt (I bought a sack for this style of ale) to give the coppery gold colour profile. Crystal would work and I have also enjoyed using 100% Bairds Marris Otter as the grist. In defence of Mssrs Wheeler and Protz, I think it's also worth noting the fine print that suggests a 90 minute boil which may help out colour-wise.

Doc / Ross - Agree that the 15g of hops may be a bit light - perhaps they were referring to fresh whole flowers and not pellets? Whatever the outcome, I see that Michael Jackson also remarked on the aroma of the beer

"Timothy Taylor's has been using the same yeast for at least 30 years. It is a hybrid of the John Smith's and former Oldham Brewery yeasts, and Mr. Hey reckons it produces a beer with a "polished" clarity, firm "mouth-feel" and quenching finish. Open fermenters are used, too."

"Before the glass coded "R" reached my lips, my senses were aroused by the aroma of hops. If you think that sounds fanciful, you have never had a truly hoppy beer. This was such a brew. The hop is a resiny flower, and here it was at its aromatic best, as sharp as the zest from an orange-skin. At first sip, I doubted we could taste a better ale among the seven finalists."

Jackson's TTLL hop schedule differed from the original Camra receipe - he suggested Fuggles for bittering, Goldings for flavour and Styrian Goldings for aroma and apparently suggested a hopback. A local brewclub member also noted that Protz eventually confirmed Jackson's hop schedule back in the Encyclopedia of Wine, Beer and Spririts (2000).

The original hop schedule - Styrian and Fuggles for bittering and Goldings for aroma - has been modified to reflect the Michael Jackson profile.

And finally, an apology - to Doc! I certainly didn't mean to "stomp" your excellent recipe - which looks great btw and the MO / Munich I combo is a favourite of mine.

Timothy Taylor Best Bitter

by Trough Lolly » Monday Apr 21, 2008 2:04 pm


Wheeler, G and Protz, R, 1998, Brew Your Own British Real Ale , CAMRA Ltd, p.144.

Timothy Taylor Best Bitter

A golden bitter of exceptional quality and drinkability. Full and complex grain and fruit with deep, dry nutty finish.

3600g Golden Promise malt
220g crystal malt

22g Styrian Goldings hops (7.9%) at start of boil
26g Fuggles hops (4.5%) at start of boil
10g Goldings hops (5.3%) at 15 mins
Irish moss at 15 mins

Mash at 60C ((that's wot it says!)) for 90 mins. Boil time 90 mins . Racking gravity 1009, 2.2o Plato. 3.8% abv, 24 IBU, 17 EBC, 9 SRM.

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by rohanbutler » Tuesday Apr 22, 2008 10:12 am

Have been following this with interest as although I have not tried Landord myself, several mates with excellent beer taste have come back from the UK and have raved about this beer.

First question where in Victoria would you source some of this for a taste test(admittedly I haven't looked hard at Dan Murphys)

Secondly, I would like to try and brew something like this (would impress said mates I could come even close to this beer), but I'm only set up for the Trough Lough Partial Mash In the kitchen for the moment, so any suggestions on converting to a partial recipe?

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by tazman67 » Tuesday Apr 22, 2008 10:57 am

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by Trough Lolly » Tuesday Apr 22, 2008 2:39 pm

rohanbutler wrote: Hey Guys,

Have been following this with interest as although I have not tried Landord myself, several mates with excellent beer taste have come back from the UK and have raved about this beer.

First question where in Victoria would you source some of this for a taste test(admittedly I haven't looked hard at Dan Murphys)

Secondly, I would like to try and brew something like this (would impress said mates I could come even close to this beer), but I'm only set up for the Trough Lough Partial Mash In the kitchen for the moment, so any suggestions on converting to a partial recipe?

Hi Rohan,
I'm sure there are bottleshops in Melbourne that would stock Madonna's favourite beer - TTLL ale - it wouldn't be at a regular drive thru you'd need to go to a place that prides itself on it's range of imported beers. But you should find it or at least place an order for it, if you shop around.

English Bitters are easy to convert from all grain to extract. In this case, I would recommend light liquid malt extract and a modest (<250g) addition of crystal malt or Caramunich I if you have it. I'll assume that you will do a concentrated / non-full volume boil and you'll need to increase the size of your hop additions to compensate accordingly. Some recipe software will help sort out the details.

You might want to consider dry hopping the aroma addition of Styrian Goldings in your primary, or better, secondary fermenter before bottling / kegging. As Doc mentioned in his original post, aim for an OG of around 1.044 and if you're not yet ready for liquid yeast, you might want to use Windsor British Ale dry yeast for this brew.

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by drsmurto » Wednesday Apr 23, 2008 12:37 pm

No worries TL. My attempts arent spot on clones, would never try to claim such but its a tasty ESB nonetheless.

sampled a few more pints on the weekend now that my overcarb issue has been solved (got a bit too energetic during the force carbing) and i reckon i might add 1-2% english crystal next time. The difference in esters between 18 and 20 is huge. I might go back to 20C for the next one.

Still tempted to try a 100% vienna version.

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by rohanbutler » Wednesday Apr 23, 2008 2:55 pm

How does this look (straight out of beer smith),

21L
1.50 kg Pilsner Liquid Extract (6.9 EBC) Extract 32.97 % (in 12L boil)
1.50 kg Pilsner Liquid Extract (6.9 EBC) Extract 32.97 % (after boil)
1.30 kg Pale Malt, Maris Otter (5.9 EBC) Grain 28.57 % (In boil)
0.25 kg Caramunich Malt (110.3 EBC) Grain 5.49 % (in boil)
45.00 gm Fuggles [6.10 %] (60 min) Hops 39.1 IBU
20.00 gm Goldings, East Kent [5.00 %] (20 min) Hops 4.8 IBU
15.00 gm Styrian Goldings [4.80 %] (20 min) Hops 3.5 IBU
15.00 gm Styrian Goldings [4.80 %] (Dry Hop 5 days) Hops -
Est Original Gravity: 1.045 SG Est Final Gravity: 1.012 SG
Estimated Alcohol by Vol: 4.35 %
Bitterness: 47.3 IBU Est Color: 15.5 EBC

I have used the pilsner liquid extract, as it was the lightest liquid extract o beersmith, but I in reailty I would use prolly cooper Light liquid male extract. I was going to make it a 23L batch but cut it back to 21 in order to achieve a slightly higher OG. I was playing around with the ingredients in order to try and get that OG up and it didn't seem to matter what I did to the Marris Otter, it just wouldn't effect my OG, is this right?

My preference would be to use the TTLL (Wyeast #1469) liquid yeast the Doc has been using but, I can't find any reference to this yeast strain anywhere. Not in beersmith, not on wyyeast's website not on g&g's list on their website. Maybe I'm suffering from the evolved strain of domestic blindness, "internet blindness" (a term I use for people who ring me @ work to get information that is clearly available on the web if they look!)


As I mentioned earlier, Timothy Taylor’s Landlord is unusual in that the cask version is stronger than the bottled version. The cask is 4.3% while the bottle is just 4.1%. Granted, the difference is minimal, but it is still pretty rare.

Timothy Taylor’s Landlord is not gluten-free. This is because it is brewed with malted barley which contains gluten. There is currently no gluten-free version of Landlord, though there may be in the future. Greene King has started to brew gluten-free versions of its most popular beers.


Beer of the Week: Timothy Taylor’s Landlord


Timothy Taylor's Landlord is a four-time Champion Beer of Britain. (Fritz Hahn/The Washington Post)

The announcement of the Supreme Champion Beer of Britain is always a highlight of the Great British Beer Festival, but this year’s was more newsworthy than usual: For the first time in the competition’s 38-year history, the tasting panel passed over bitters and milds to select what the British call “Specialty Beer”: Bingham’s Vanilla Stout, a “dark stout infused with vanilla and dark malts.”

I’m intrigued about trying it, but like many beers from smaller British breweries, Vanilla Stout probably won’t make it to America anytime soon. To compensate, I decided to pour myself a glass of one of my favorite English ales: Timothy Taylor’s Landlord, a smooth and malty Yorkshire bitter that has been the Supreme Champion Beer of Britain four times, most recently finishing as the runner-up in 2010.

Forget fancy Teku glasses: This bronze-colored ale is right at home in a nonic pint glass. Bitter marmalade, caramel and stone-fruit flavors dominate, but the sweetness of the barley is perfectly balanced by floral, citrusy hops.

Take the advice on the label and serve Landlord cool (51 to 55 degrees) rather than straight out of the refrigerator: When it’s ice-cold, you lose some of the rich malt, which is what makes Landlord such a classic.


Timothy Taylor's Landlord Reviews

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Beer Review: Timothy Taylor Landlord - Recipes

by hirns » Saturday Oct 22, 2011 8:54 am

Without having to go back through the 13 pages of this post can I ask if you rack this beer and if so when? I find that the 1469 krausen takes forever and a day to drop.

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by drsmurto » Monday Oct 24, 2011 9:39 am

Yes, I am a racker. Generally 14 days for an ale but the last batch only had 9 days. Then cold condition for a week or more before bottling/kegging.

WY1469 does take a while to drop, perfect for top cropping.

Got lots of good feedback on the Landlord through the handpump on Saturday night. Was basically flat and warm.

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by hirns » Monday Oct 24, 2011 9:30 pm

last time I waited three weeks for it to drop(never seen the likes of it).

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by rotten » Monday Oct 24, 2011 10:26 pm

Gday Hirns.
I used 1469 heaps when it was released last year and racked it at about 7-10 day mark, I normally cc'd before and after racking though. I did wait ages for the first one to drop, it never did.
I need to brew this again soon, the fresh pack talks to me every time I open the fridge. Need more hops though

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by Oliver » Friday Mar 01, 2013 12:08 pm

Would you mind posting the latest incarnation of TTL here as I'm planning to brew it next week.

I am assuming it would have changed since the first post in this thread, back in 2008

3.75 kg Pale Malt, Maris Otter (5.9 EBC) Grain 92.59 %
0.30 kg Munich I (Weyermann) (14.0 EBC) Grain 7.41 %
45.00 gm Fuggles [4.40 %] (60 min) Hops 25.2 IBU
30.00 gm Goldings, East Kent [4.50 %] (20 min) Hops 10.4 IBU
30.00 gm Styrian Goldings [4.70 %] (20 min) (Aroma Hop-Steep) Hops -
0.50 items Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 15.0 min) Misc
1 Pkgs TTL (Wyeast #1469) [Starter 2000 ml] Yeast-Ale

20L - OG 1.044, IBU 35.6, EBC 9.6

Mashed in at 65, mash out 78.

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by drsmurto » Tuesday Mar 05, 2013 12:38 pm

Yes, it is different these days

97% Thomas Fawcetts MO or GP
3% Dark crystal
Fuggles @ 60 to 30 IBU total
1g/L EKG @ 20
1.5g/L Styrian Goldings @ 0
WY1469
OG 1.044
65C Mash

Would you mind posting the latest incarnation of TTL here as I'm planning to brew it next week.

I am assuming it would have changed since the first post in this thread, back in 2008

3.75 kg Pale Malt, Maris Otter (5.9 EBC) Grain 92.59 %
0.30 kg Munich I (Weyermann) (14.0 EBC) Grain 7.41 %
45.00 gm Fuggles [4.40 %] (60 min) Hops 25.2 IBU
30.00 gm Goldings, East Kent [4.50 %] (20 min) Hops 10.4 IBU
30.00 gm Styrian Goldings [4.70 %] (20 min) (Aroma Hop-Steep) Hops -
0.50 items Whirlfloc Tablet (Boil 15.0 min) Misc
1 Pkgs TTL (Wyeast #1469) [Starter 2000 ml] Yeast-Ale

20L - OG 1.044, IBU 35.6, EBC 9.6

Mashed in at 65, mash out 78.

RE: Timothy Taylor Landlord water profile/additions

by billy bignutz » Tuesday Mar 03, 2015 9:20 am

Water profile and additions.
Hi Dr Smurto (or anyone that does water additions). I noticed some time back that you said you were going to tank water and would have to start adding salts. I have no choice but use tank water and water additions as I live rural and was wondering what water profile you use and what additions for your particular volumes of mash in and sparge waters. Being a light coloured ale my calculations require a lot of acid additions to get the PH down.

I am really looking forward to my first attempt at this brew - a 50L batch straight off.

Re: RE: Timothy Taylor Landlord water profile/additions

by drsmurto » Tuesday Mar 10, 2015 8:25 pm

billy bignutz wrote: Water profile and additions.
Hi Dr Smurto (or anyone that does water additions). I noticed some time back that you said you were going to tank water and would have to start adding salts. I have no choice but use tank water and water additions as I live rural and was wondering what water profile you use and what additions for your particular volumes of mash in and sparge waters. Being a light coloured ale my calculations require a lot of acid additions to get the PH down.

I am really looking forward to my first attempt at this brew - a 50L batch straight off.

Not a fan of calculating pH, the buffering capacity of the malt itself is ignored. Designed by engineers whose total knowledge of chemical equilibria could be chiselled on a grain of rice with a shovel. Along with their understanding of chemistry in general. But i digress. Measure the pH. If it is out (and i would wager it probably is not) then you can attempt to adjust the pH.

Yes, I've been using tank water for a number of years now and always adjust the chemical profile to suit the brew i am doing. For the Landlord I use my 'Yorkshire' profile. When i talk about profiles these are not historical water profiles which I'd wager no commercial brewery actually uses but a profile I have created to favour a particular flavour or style. In general, sulfate for hoppy beers, chloride for malty beers. An oversimplification but it works. My most common water profile is called 'Balanced' and is designed for the vast majority of my beers which are brew to be balanced between malt and hops. This profile has a sulfate:chloride ratio of

My Yorkshire profile for 35L of tank water (<0.1 ppm of the brewing relevant salts as measured via ICPMS) requires 5g of calcium sulfate, 6g of calcium chloride and 3g of calcium carbonate. The way i tend to deal with this is dissolve the calcium sulfate and chloride in the 35L of water and dispense from this for the mash and sparge water. I add the calcium carbonate to the kettle as it doesn't dissolve in water at neutral pH. Another way of adding the salts is to calculate how much water you need for the mash as a % of the total water and add that % of the salts. Add the rest to the tun when the sparge water goes in (assuming a single batch sparge).

I would advise putting your tank water through a carbon filter before using it for brewing to strip out any organics/biological contaminants in there. My water tastes pretty good and i often drink it unfiltered but i still run it through a carbon filter for brewing (and for the espresso machine).

Re: Timothy Taylor Landlord

by Autonomous Collective » Friday Jul 03, 2015 3:43 pm

I'm newly joined to the forum having popped in every now and then to look at recipes etc. I completed one of these TTL brews a few weeks back. I have to say it was the best tasting brew I have ever completed, it also gets better as it warms up unlike most of the muck you buy in the pub or bottello. A mate of mine and I quaffed the lot in under 10 days it was so tasty. Just done an Irish Red and heading back to the TTL again to fill up the fridge.

Excellent forum you have here well done. You may see quite a bit more from me.


Review: Timothy Taylor's Landlord Classic Pale Ale

This is a new one to me: Timothy Taylor's Landlord Classic Pale Ale, an English-style pale ale by Timothy Taylor's Championship Beers out of West Yorkshire, UK. I know that English ales are an area that I don't tend to review often.. or at all. I find that aside from the darker ales, I'm just not a fan of British beer. That's to the point where I'll bypass the English section completely every time I go to the LC.

Appearance: Pours a (mostly) clear amber/honey ale with a good amount of carbonation, a fair amount of beige head on top with there being a bit of the foam sticking to the glassware as the beer goes down sip by sip.

Aroma: A malt-foward pale ale, I get notes of honey, caramel, tea and a rich barley graininess. A bit of a corn aroma is present as well. This is quite a sweet smelling beer.

Taste: Fairly skunky with a hint of corn. Like the aroma, it's a malt forward beer so I'm getting a sweet caramel flavour in there. There's a bit of toasted barley, lemongrass and a light amount of leafy herbal hop notes that are a bit reminiscent of tea. Light amount of bitter aftertaste on the palate, fairly clean and crisp on the palate.

Overall Thoughts: A fairly grainy yet malty Pale Ale that I could see myself drinking at a dimly lit pub in England. Not really my style of ale but I really appreciated the herbal notes that showed its presence in the aroma and taste. With a name like Timothy Taylor's Landlord, I now want to see a "Tim the Toolman Taylor" beer. 4.1% ABV


Watch the video: Timothy Taylors Landlord Dark (December 2021).