Traditional recipes

Prince Harry Sidesteps the Great Pizza Debate by Eating Both Deep-Dish and Thin-Crust in Chicago

Prince Harry Sidesteps the Great Pizza Debate by Eating Both Deep-Dish and Thin-Crust in Chicago

And he doesn’t even normally eat pizza

Photokvu / Dreamstime

The U.K.’s Prince Harry is not living his best life. Why? He’s never toasted a marshmallow, and he doesn’t even eat pizza! On a recent trip to Hyde Park Academy in Chicago, he and former first lady Michelle Obama sat down with the high school’s students. Deep-dish pizza is a Chi-town staple so, naturally, it was emphasized that the Brit needed to dine like a true Chicagoan.

In a video posted to Kensington Palace’s official Instagram, one student said, “When Prince Harry’s here, he eats Chicago. Make sure he has a pizza.”

The prince replied, “I had pizza last night. I don’t even eat pizza anymore, but I had pizza last night.”

When asked whether or not he tried deep-dish, he said, “We had deep-dish and we had thin crust. I promise you, I will make sure I eat Chicago.”

But Harry hasn’t always had a pizza-restrictive diet. In 2015, former Royal Family chef Darren McGrady told People magazine that when Harry was a young lad, he and brother William once swapped their nanny’s dinner note for one they’d made themselves — requesting pizza. McGrady said, “They may be royal children, but they still have children’s palates.”

So Harry doesn’t love pizza anymore, but what are his favorite foods? Here’s what the British Royal Family really eats at home.


Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.

Useful Notes / Cuisines in America

America &mdash AKA the United States note i.e., of America, mostly the bit between Mexico and Canada, not any other federal states with similar names &mdash has often been described as a "melting pot". This is very, very true. International influences are all over the art, the population, the languages, and most tellingly, the cuisine. Depending on where you live, you can find all kinds of cuisine in the good old U.S. of A.

Your area may have only a few of these cuisines, or it may have all of them. Obviously, if you live in Nowhere, Indiana, you can't expect to drive on down to the four-star French restaurant for a bite to eat and if you live in New York City, you're probably within walking distance (or at least subway distance) of about 20 world-class culinary establishments&mdashand several dozen less-than-world-class ones, as well. Location, location, location. This note is meant as a broad overview of the dining options one can find in the United States.

Before we begin, here are several warnings we have for the tourists and those planning to visit or move to the USA:

  1. There is so much sugar in the recipes of many, if not most, dishes in the United States that foreigners not accustomed to it are said to find American food disconcertingly sweet.
    • Note that this can be inverted in the case of starches. The American palate expects bread (that isn't specifically a sweet bread such as cinnamon rolls), a staple food expected to be served with many, many types of meals (with the exception of some ethnic cuisines), to be more "yeasty" in flavor, and potato-based dishes to be starchy and salty. This can be disconcerting to a visitor to, for instance, China, where bread tends toward sweet, as do potato chips.
    • More generally, people accustomed to many East and Southeast Asian cuisines should not be surprised at the amount of sweetness, and may in fact find American dishes surprisingly dry (in the sense of not sweet). One suspects that the popularity of East Asian cooking in the US has something to do with both regions' fondness of combining sweet and savory flavors.
    • Also note that, when we say "sugar", what we often mean is "high-fructose corn syrup" (or HFCS), a sugar substitute derived from corn. This is frequently used in place of cane sugar due to both large subsidies granted to corn farmers and strict quotas on cane sugar imports, and unless a sweet food is explicitly specified as not having HFCS in it, it can be assumed to have it. The only problem this causes is that Jewish restrictions on grains during Passover prevent its consumption for them around then.
  2. The food tends to be in very large portions as well, relative to those of most other countries, particularly in Southern states. So be careful how much you order it might be more than you expect. Drinks are also much larger, though in fairness, that is in part because cold drinks contain a lot of ice (See #4 below), and in part because many parts of the United States have hot climates that will dehydrate you, especially in summer, if you don't frequently replenish your fluids. * Not just the arid climates you'll lose plenty of fluids in a hot and humid climate, though you'll likely be quicker to notice you need water in an arid region. Important: Unlike in many cultures, it is not considered rude to leave food on your plate. In most restaurants, it is considered normal to take any leftovers home in a box to eat later. This would usually be considered odd behavior if dining as a guest in an American home unless your hosts offer you some leftovers, but it's common for there to be some degree of encouragement to do so when quantities allow, particularly with family or close friends. note Reusable containers for said leftovers have an entire unspoken system of etiquette of their own. Returning a container in a clean state (with the proper lid) can range from a polite gesture to Serious Business depending on the quality of the container.
  3. Although this might conceivably vary by region a little (as well as those with lactose intolerance), in America we're willing to put cheese on everything. note This has been noticed abroad James May, when joking that Richard Hammond is really an American after a Top Gear bit on NASCAR, noted that Hammond owns a Mustang, has cowboy boots, and "put[s] cheese on everything." One of the few exceptions to this rule is fish. note And even then, the McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich contains cheese, and queso fresco is also common on fish tacos.
    • Americans are, however, relatively conservative in their cheese tastes, going mainly for firm, salty, mild-tasting cheeses and processed cheese foods imitating flavors thereof. Predominant varieties include Cheddar, Colby (similar to Cheddar but softer and milder), Monterey Jack (similar to Colby but white and sometimes sold with minced hot peppers mixed in as "Pepper Jack"), Colby-Jack (a hybrid of the last two), Mozzarella (the cheese of choice for pizzas), Swiss note a derivative of Emmentaler (no self-respecting deli doesn't offer sandwiches with Swiss), Feta (no Greek restaurant will go without liberal Feta usage, and many Middle Eastern restaurants will also include it due to the fact that its flavor profile works well with their food), "Mexican" (could be any number of things, although commonly it's imitation Oaxaca the closer you are to an area with a large Mexican-American population, the better a shot you have at finding the real deal), Parmesan (based on Parmigiano-Reggiano and generally sold ground-up and used as a condiment or garnish), Provolone (only vaguely similar to the Italian cheese of the same name how vaguely depends on how far from the East Coast you are, with East Coast versions being a reasonable facsimile note With Philadelphia and New York having particularly good versions the extra-sharp provolone used on Philadelphia's roast pork and roast beef sandwiches and available for its famous cheesesteaks is, if not authentic, then good enough that visiting Italians overlook the dissimilarity. and more distant ones. um. not), "cream cheese" (a mild, spreadable processed cheese food, vaguely reminiscent of several European soft cheeses), Cheez Whiz, and of course, American cheese and its derivative, Velveeta note Also note that there's American cheese, which is similar to Cheddar/Colby, and "Pasteurized Process American Cheese Food Product", which is the individually-wrapped slices that most people think of when they hear "American cheese" both PPACFP and Velveeta are specifically designed to melt well rather than to taste good in unmelted form, though people are much more likely to eat PPACFP without actually heating it than they are to eat Velveeta that way . There is an increasing interest in imported and artisanal cheeses&mdashartisanal cheddar production in the US has been a movement since at least The '90s. With very rare exceptions (almost all involving cream cheese), cheese is only eaten with savory dishes as opposed to sweet ones.
  4. Americans generally prefer their drinks cold – and that means refrigerated, and often with ice cubes (sometimes with crushed ice cubes). See the sections on tea and beer below, and note that other common drinks like sodas, milkshakes, and several types of mixed drinks are all served this way. Even iced coffee has become popular in recent years. Don't hesitate to ask for no ice if you prefer it. Restaurants, be they fancy-French or fast-food, will always comply. Further, water falls into this category, with "glacial runoff" being the preferred temperature. This is particularly true in the South, where summers are often unbearably hot and humid.
  5. Main dishes typically contain meat, which, like everything else in the country, is often served in large portions in restaurants. There is a growing interest in vegetarianism and veganism in the country, and more restaurants are offering meatless options.
  6. Regulators have a more lax attitude toward food additives in packaged food than in Europe, though again there is a movement toward more "natural" foods with fewer artificial ingredients.
  7. Finally, when considering American "ethnic" restaurants, it is advisable to imagine that there is a silent "-American" on the end of any ethnic identification, meaning "Italian" food would be more accurately described as "Italian-American" food. As a rule, all of these types of restaurants get their menus from localized versions of whatever was popular when the primary segment of the immigrant group in question moved to America, which often bears little to no resemblance to current national cuisines. To give an example, people used to European-Italian food are often confused when watching a show like Everybody Loves Raymond, where the Italian-American Barone family are frequently seen around the dinner table. The dishes Marie Barone prepares are often named, even described, but are not found in European Italian cooking. Even when they are familiar, the names ascribed to them are Italian-American and completely different (as names of dishes may have changed over time, and these names were hardly standardized in the first place) this is further confused for Europeans by different pronunciation, derived from decades of Americanization of names that aren't exactly "Italian" in the first place (they tend to be Neapolitan or Sicilian). However compared to much of Europe it is easier to get half-way "authentic" "ethnic" food as there are large immigrant populations to cater to in major cities. American "Chinese" food is way different from European "Chinese" food and the fact that Chinatown is a thing in the US plays a role there.

  • A corollary to this, however, is that many Americans are well aware of the divergence between "their" versions of immigrant cuisine and the real thing, and that more authentic restaurants do exist in larger urban centers and in places where recent immigrants of that ethnicity are concentrated.
  • Another thing to note is that many food both Americans and people from the country of origin assume are American inventions actually come from the country of origin, but only one small area or an ethnic group that mainly fled. Chop Suey and many other "American" Chinese dishes are actually Cantonese, and much Eastern European cuisine is actually Ashkenazi Jewish.
  • There are two levels of ethnic cuisine: the cuisines founded by working-class immigrants to feed their peers and later adopted by the rest of the country, with Jewish, Cantonese ("Chinese American"), and Sicilian-Neapolitan ("Italian American", or sometimes "red-sauce Italian") being the most distinctive examples, and the "classy" places serving national cuisines which the chefs either had to be imported for or go to a special school for because there aren't large populations in the US, with the best examples being French and Northern Italian.


Watch the video: Breaking News. Prince harry sidesteps the great pizza debate by eating both deep-dish and thin-cru (December 2021).