Traditional recipes

7 Most Inappropriate Restaurant Names

7 Most Inappropriate Restaurant Names

At these eateries, the title says it all

Leonardo DiCaprio and Blake Lively were spotted this week, according to Page 6, eating lunch side by side at Pink Taco, an upscale Mexican restaurant in Los Angeles. The thing that sucks about Pink Taco, aside from its somehow chauvinist name, is that they recently painted a donkey pink in a publicity stunt that got them a lot of negative attention from animal lovers. But what do you expect from a restaurant with a title like that? Don't answer, it's rhetorical. The question we did want answered was what other offensive restaurant names are out there. These are a few of our favorites; some are good enough to make Pink Taco blush...

More on Shine: Are Foie Gras Farms Cruel?

1. Mother Clucker's
Iroquois, Ontario

2. A&K Lick-a-Chick
Bras d'Or, Nova Scotia

3. Dirty Dick's Crab House
Nag's Head, NC

4. Hooters
Every. where.

5. Big Pecker's Bar & Grill
Ocean City, MD

6. Thai Me Up
New York, New York

7. Hung Far Low
Portland, OR

More from Yahoo! Shine:

  • Margarita Recipes
  • McDonald's Happy Meal Overhaul: Will Kids Want It?
  • Why Beyoncé Should Write a Cookbook If She Pleases

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


12 Desserts With Ridiculous Names That Taste Ridiculously Good

When it came to naming desserts, old-timey people differed from contemporary cooks in their belief that you could name a dessert more or less anything even if it sounded silly (fool), puzzlingly unappetizing (Eton mess), or borderline gross (grunt). They also felt compelled to give distinct names to every possible permutation of cobbler. But the idiosyncrasies of old-school cooks are your gain.

1. Apple Platz

Platz occupies the sweet spot between cake and pie. And if you think about it, isn't that a spot you'd like to visit?

2. Summer Berry Grunt

The line between cobbler and grunt is a fine one, but essentially a grunt is a cobbler that's slow-cooked on the stovetop (or in this case, a slow cooker). The name supposedly comes from the sound the berries make as the dish cooks. No matter what you call it, this is a delicious dessert that's a snap to make.

3. Damson Plum Clafoutis

Clafoutis is a dessert from France that consists of fruit folded into a thick custardy batter that's then baked. Some people will tell you it's not really a clafoutis if it's not made with cherries. You have permission to tell those people to shut it and then eat this plum clafoutis.

4. Tiny Raspberry Fools

Fools are old-fashioned English desserts with loads of bright, tangy flavor. Traditionally made with gooseberries or currants, they're also wonderful with the tart, sweet goodness of totally fresh raspberries. You'd be a fool not to make them. (Sorry, not sorry.)

5. Rhubarb Eton Mess

When it comes to giving foods funny names, nobody outdoes the British. Compared with other English classics like Toad in the Hole and Spotted Dick, Eton Mess seems almost boring. But if the name is a little lackluster, the taste is anything but. Fruit, meringue, and cream are all mixed together is one giant, well, mess. Perfect for a casual outing, or any time you want to make dessert for a group but are worried about nailing the presentation.

6. Apple Blood Orange Buckle

A buckle is a traditional American cake with fruit added to the batter and then topped with a crumble or streusel topping. This cake has a rustic appearance making it a great antidote to the over-worked and over-decorated cakes that force you to give up a whole afternoon.

7. Peach Brown Betty

The Brown Betty is like a fruit crisp, but with a breadcrumb topping. This is probably the easiest dessert to make short of just scooping ice cream into a bowl. So get cracking.

8. Old-Fashioned Apple Pandowdy


The pandowdy is another cobbler variation with a crumbly crust that's broken up by the juices of the fruit as it cooks. Apple is the classic filling, and when you taste it, you'll know why it became a classic.

9. Strawberry Eton Mess

Eton mess can be made with a variety of fruits, but strawberries are the most traditional. Make it for your next cricket outing or when you're entertaining an earl at your estate. Or whatever.

10. Blueberry Buckle Cake

Think of this as an enormous blueberry muffin. Just like that one dream you had.

11. Clafoutis Aux Prunes

Don't let the name fool you this isn't some kind of old-person dessert. "Prune" is just French for "plum."

12. Johnnycake Cobblers

This variation on cobbler uses johnnycakes (a type of cornmeal cake) in place of biscuit or pie dough to produce a cobbler with a rustic cornbread feel.


Watch the video: AYΣΤΗΡΩΣ ΚΑΤΑΛΛΗΛΟ part (December 2021).