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Paris Nudist Restaurant Bans Diners from Wearing Clothes

Paris Nudist Restaurant Bans Diners from Wearing Clothes

The restaurant banned cameras and clothes from the dining room

O'Naturel is the first nudist restaurant in Paris.

There’s no need to agonize about picking the right outfit for dinner at the new Paris restaurant, O’Naturel, because the restaurant requires all guests to be completely naked during dinner.

According to ABC News, O’Naturel opened this month in the 12th Arrondissement of Paris. It bills itself as the city’s first naturist restaurant, and all diners must leave all their clothes and cameras in a locker room before entering the dining room.

The restaurant was started by brothers Stephane and Mike Saada, who said they wanted to give nudists a chance to travel and practice their hobby year-round, instead of only during the summer. Their 20-seat restaurant opened this month, and it seats guests for dinner from Tuesday to Saturday. The menu is a three-course prix fixe for $58, and guests can choose from foie gras, lobster, escargots, lamb, and scallops. Reservations are required.

In the interest of making sure all guests are optimally comfortable, O’Naturel has a lot of rules. For starters, all guests must be nude. All cell phones and cameras are prohibited in the dining room, so nobody will be Instagramming their food at this particular restaurant. Exhbitionism and disrespectful sexual behavior are also banned.

French law requires all servers and kitchen staff to be clothed at all times while working, so the staff are not part of the entertainment.

The naturist restaurant says it is not at all unhygienic. Chair covers are changed after every meal, so every guest gets a clean new seat to sit on while dining naked. Hygiene is a prime concern in any situation involving food, so check out these other food safety rules you need to follow.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


Paris bars to close as Covid infections rise among young people

Bars in the Paris region have been ordered to close from Tuesday after health authorities reported a sharp rise in the number of Covid-19 infections among the 20-30 age group.

Restaurants in and around the French capital have been given a reprieve and told they can stay open on condition that they enforce new, stricter health safety regulations. This will involve taking the name and telephone number of diners, allowing a maximum of six people per group and providing hand gel on each table.

The city’s police chief said this applied only to establishments “whose main activity is serving food”.

Cinemas, theatres and museums will continue to open but sports and fitness clubs will remain closed. Swimming pools and sports halls will be closed to adults but not to minors.

The Paris police prefect, Didier Lallement, told a press conference: “This morning we enter a new phase. We are adapting all the time to the development of the virus. These measures are aimed at slowing the spread of the virus because it is spreading too quickly.”

Lallement said the measures he had decided upon were a fine “balance between the preservation of the health of our compatriots and the continuation of economic and social life”.

The measures came hours after the government announced the Paris region was being declared an area of “maximum alert” after worsening Covid-19 infection rates.

Aurélien Rousseau, the director of the regional health service, said the number of cases of coronavirus in the Île-de-France area had risen to 270 per 100,000 population, but the most worrying element was a rise to more than 500 per 100,000 population among the 20-30 age group. Rousseau said 35% of intensive care hospital beds in the Paris region were being occupied by coronavirus patients and this was expected to rise to 50%.

The following restrictions are on place for 15 days from Tuesday:

A ban on events of more than 1,000 people not including staff and security.
A ban on gatherings of more than 10 people in exterior public places.
A ban on the sale and consumption of alcohol after 10pm.
A ban on music in public places after 10pm.
No student parties or family gatherings allowed in public halls and reception areas.
University lecture halls, theatres, refectories, and libraries to reduce the number of students at any one time by 50%.
No visits to care, nursing or retirement homes without an appointment, two people maximum.
Major shopping and commercial centres to limit the number of people to one customer per 4 sq metres of floor space.

Markets remain open and demonstrations, funerals and marriages at town halls and churches will be allowed. Public transport will continue as now.


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