Traditional recipes

Media Mix: Broccoli Is Better Whole; Ben & Jerry's Help Occupy Wall Street; and Joe Jonas' Favorite Chefs

Media Mix: Broccoli Is Better Whole; Ben & Jerry's Help Occupy Wall Street; and Joe Jonas' Favorite Chefs

The Daily Byte brings you all the food news fit to read.

Don’t Argue, and Eat Your Broccoli: Researchers have found that eating broccoli whole is more nutritious than popping supplemental pills. [The Salt]

But Maybe Lay Off the Vitamins: Although we’ve been taught to take our multivitamins daily, a new study discovers that supplements may only be beneficial if you really need them. Older women who were taking additional supplements had higher mortality rates than women who were not taking vitamins. [BBC]

Peek Inside Four and Twenty Blackbirds: Edible Selby brings his camera and audio recorder to the Gowanus pie shop. The owners on pie crust: “I think it’s challenging and it’s sculptural. It’s not just about making sure all the chemistry is right. It’s more intuitive.” [T Magazine]

Peanut Butter Prices to Rise: First pumpkin, now peanuts. A summer crop shortage means peanut butter manufacturers will have to raise prices. Time to cut back on those PB&Js. [WSJ]

Ice Cream for Occupy Wall Street: Socially savvy Ben & Jerry’s came out in support of the protesters, saying, “We realize that Occupy Wall Street is calling for systemic change. We support this call to action and are honored to join you in this call to take back our nation and democracy.” Maybe this flavor will become reality. [Ben & Jerry’s]

Joe Jonas: Kid Star Turned Foodie: Now that this Jonas brother is looking to go solo, he’s revamping his image with swanky suits and swanky dinners. Apparently, he wants to start a food blog and really, really likes Tim Love’s rattlesnake tacos, Susan Feniger, Mario Batali, and Ferran Adrià. “If there’s a chef I really like, I will freak, because I think their talent is so different from what I do,” he says. Aww, starstruck celebs. [Dispatch]

The Daily Byte is a regular column dedicated to covering interesting food news and trends across the country. Click here for previous columns.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


Technician vs. Performer

A contrast between a highly-skilled, perfectionist virtuoso and a less-skilled, but more inventive and original artist. This is a plot common to stories that focus on the arts (usually music or theater), or sports that require mixing physical ability with creativity (such as dancing or skating).

Alice has been in ballet classes since she could walk. She practices every day, pushing herself to always do better than her best. She's the star of every production and the prize pupil of every teacher. But as devoted as she is to her art, she doesn't always seem to enjoy it. She has no social life because she'll be at the studio long after everyone else has gone home. She has many admirers but few real friends. She may even downplay her own talent, focusing on her mistakes rather than her successes. If she's really unlucky, she's burdened with a domineering Stage Mom.

Betty started ballet a year ago. She never arrives early nor stays late. She doesn't have much interest in technical perfection, and sometimes she'll even improvise her own moves and go off script. Nevertheless she loves to dance, and it shows. Even if she lands flat on her tail, she leaves the audience smiling. She has a life outside the studio, a solid family who cheers no matter what she does, and an infectious grin. If ballet ever stops being fun, she'll just stop doing it, but one gets the sense that she'll never get tired of dancing.

Put the two on stage together and the judges will prefer Alice, but the audience will prefer Betty.

The audience doesn't see Alice's perfect form. They see that she dances with a face like a wet weekend. Betty turns a pratfall into a quirky dance move, makes faces at the kid in the front row, and laughs her way through the final act. Alice may be rolling her eyes from backstage, but she will go home wondering why the crowd cheered for that nonsense when all she got was polite applause.

The difference between them is that Alice dances to meet a standard &mdash either one she puts on herself or one others have put on her &mdash while Betty dances for the sheer joy of the art. The watching audience may not realize what a "perfect performance" is, but they know when the dancers are enjoying themselves. and even those who do know what good form is would rather see originality, artistic interpretation, and plain simple fun &mdash which Alice often can't do, because improvisation, invention, and fun often risk that sense of 'perfection'.

Typically, these two will spur each other competitively in some way. They may find that they're Not So Different in certain aspects of their lives and passions. Sometimes, Defeat Means Friendship will take hold, and the girls will learn from each other: Alice will learn to loosen up and rediscover the joy of her art, and Betty will try and emulate Alice's dedication and practice. If they don't come to terms, it can lead to some nasty results or a breakdown.

A Sister Trope to Red Oni, Blue Oni, where the Technician is the blue oni (cool, methodical, logical) and the Performer is red (energetic, instinctive, emotional). Obviously, these two archetypes can manifest differently depending on the situation they're involved in, such as:

  • A martial artist who uses precise, traditional moves vs one who dances around and uses unorthodox techniques
  • A painter of simplistic, cheerful paintings in an art school full of students obsessed with complexity
  • A musician who finds sheet music boring and likes to jazz them up with their own variations, to the consternation of a band member who has been practicing with that sheet music for months

Generally, the narrative will be in favor of the enthusiastic performer (who sometimes has The Gift, but not always) rather than the diligent technician. At its best, the trope sings the praises of enjoying yourself and being unique at its worst, it implies that technical skill means Creative Sterility.

Differs slightly from (but is related to) Hard Work Hardly Works, where the technician is undeniably better at what they do, but they are contrasted with a Brilliant, but Lazy performer who is ultimately more fun to watch, or gets acceptable results with a fraction of the effort. In this case, Hard Work Hardly Works adds insult to injury by giving the cheerful slacker superior skill than those around them who actually practice. Also similar to Weak, but Skilled similar in that there is a better trained performer against a stronger or more talented rival, but different in that the one with the best training wins, usually through cleverness and skill.

At times, Alice and Betty may cross paths with Cassie: a character who is both technician and performer. In this case, Cassie's background may overlap with Talented, but Trained (innate talent + hard work).

Contrast the Villainy-Free Villain and Opposing Sports Team. Could also be seen as a form of Snobs Vs Slobs, with fastidious technicians who pay attention to detail as the foil for performers who believe in doing what comes naturally. In a military or combative setting, this dichotomy may form the basis for Opposing Combat Philosophies, along with Soldier vs. Warrior.


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