Traditional recipes

The Sazerac

The Sazerac

This cocktail has been around for over a century

shutterstock/Martiapunts

This deadly drink, originally comprised of Sazerac French brandy and Peychaud’s bitters, has been around for over a century — it was the first “branded” cocktail in America, or, some argue, the world. By the time it was first bottled, in 1933, it was made with American rye whiskey rather than brandy and a dash of absinthe.

This recipe is courtesy of Sazerac.com.

Ingredients

  • 1 cube sugar
  • 1 1/2 Ounce Sazerac Rye Whiskey
  • 1/4 ounces Herbsaint
  • 3 Dashes of Peychaud’s bitters
  • Lemon peel

The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.


The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.


The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.


The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.


The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.


The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.


The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.


The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.


The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.


The Sazerac

Alanna Hale

Sometimes it’s helpful to think of a garnish in an uncommon way. Consider the absinthe rinse found in a traditional Sazerac cocktail as an aromatic garnish that’s placed underneath the drink. It incorporates into the finished product but also retains some aromatics along the inside collar of the glass. The classic methodology is to pour a small measure of absinthe into the glass, swirl it, and then dump it out, which coats the glass evenly, but is also a waste of absinthe and is slightly messy. This version uses an atomizer filled with absinthe to neatly and evenly coat the inside of the glass.

This recipe is excerpted from The Bar Book. Read our review.

Visit our Drinks & Entertaining page for more classic cocktail recipes.