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Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk

Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk

A little girl has the Internet in tears with her mission to buy milk for everybody

A little girl named Sunshine raised enough money to buy milk for every classmate who couldn't afford it.

A five-year-old girl from Michigan warmed the Internet’s collective heart this week when she emptied out her own piggy bank to try to buy milk for a friend who couldn’t afford it. Now her story has touched so many people that her whole class will have milk for at least a year.

According to CBS News, five-year-old Sunshine Oelfke’s grandmother found her emptying out her piggy bank and counting all her money into little piles. When she asked what the little girl was up to, Sunshine said she was taking the money to school to buy milk for her friend.

"I'm going to take it for milk money. I'm taking it for my friend Layla," she explained. "She doesn't get milk — her mom doesn't have milk money and I do."

Sunshine’s grandmother wasn’t going to tell her she couldn’t do that, so they drove to the school so Sunshine could put her $30 in nickels, dimes, quarters, and some bills towards her friend’s milk account.

After dropping her off, Sunshine’s grandmother told Facebook about the amazing, sweet, selfless thing her granddaughter had done. She was crying in the video, and a lot of people were touched by the kindergartener’s generosity. When people started asking if they could donate to buy milk for the kids who couldn’t afford it, she started a GoFundMe campaign.

Milk costs 45 cents a carton at Sunshine’s school. There are 20 kids in the class, and about half of those don’t get milk. Milk for all 20 kids costs about $180 a month. Sunshine’s grandmother was originally hoping to raise $700 to cover the cost of milk for the rest of the semester, but the campaign has already raised more than $7,400 in 11 days. That means any of the five-year-olds who want milk during class will be able to have it for at least the rest of the year, and this is definitely going down as one of the most inspiring food stories of 2017.


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”


Inspiring 5-Year-Old Empties Piggy Bank to Buy Classmates Milk - Recipes

Slide 5

Archive for News &ndash Page 84

Three women inducted into Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame for 2017

An historic event saw three accomplished and outstanding Canadian women inducted into the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame at a special awards banquet on November 30, 2017 in Calgary, Alberta. The 2017 inductees are Robynne Anderson, Patty Jones and Jean Szkotnicki.

“We are so proud as an organization to be recognizing these three extraordinary women for their contributions to the Canadian agriculture industry, and the contributions we know they will continue to make,” says Guy Charbonneau, President of the Canadian Agricultural Hall of Fame Association. “They are all trailblazers and focused their professional passion for our industry by leaving a lasting legacy in publishing and consulting, livestock photography and animal health.”

Nominated by Canadian Seed Growers’ Association, Canadian Seed Trade Association, SeCan and Stokes Seeds

Robynne is a visionary leader and facilitator of change. She’s dedicated her professional career to supporting, promoting and advancing the Canadian seed industry on many fronts in Canada and internationally. She was raised on a family seed farm in Manitoba, and began her career in agricultural advocacy in the political arena, working on legislation impacting the Plant Breeders’ Rights Act.

She worked extensively with the Canadian Seed Trade Association after launching Issues Ink, an agricultural publishing and consulting company that created agricultural publications including Germination, Seed World, Spud Smart, Flavourful and CAAR Communicator. In 2010, Robynne started Emerging Ag, a consulting firm to the agricultural sector. Her contributions to Canadian agriculture are extensive and diverse – including the push for identity preservation through the food production chain and as a media commentator on the seed, biotech, crop protection and fertilizer sectors. Her issues management work reaches throughout the value chain working with farmers, food processors, scientists and government.

On the international stage, Robynne founded Farming First, an international coalition of farmers, industry, civil society and academia that has become the leading voice for global agricultural advocacy. She helped make the UN’s 2016 International Year of Pulses a reality, built the International Agri-Food Network and co-founded a non-profit organization that supports orphans to learn agricultural skills through schools in Zambia.

As photographer to the bovine stars, Patty Jones’ photographs have changed the way animals are marketed in Canada and around the world. Over the past 44 years, Patty has taken more than 65,000 photographs as the owner and operator of the largest livestock photography business in Canada – Canadian Livestock Photography Inc.

Patty’s photographs have made an immeasurable contribution to the Canadian dairy industry, bringing genetics to life to help breeders market cow families and breeding stock. The Canadian artificial insemination industry has used her bull and daughter pictures of proven sires as an effective marketing tool for the global frozen semen market. She’s created a priceless visual history of breed improvements in Canadian dairy cattle.

Patty’s style, skill and patience creates the perfect picture every time, and her signature on a photograph is synonymous with success. She’s photographed cattle around the world, captured champions of every dairy breed at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, and provided photography at national, provincial and regional 4-H shows.

Patty received the highest honour from Holstein Canada in 2012 with its Certificate of Superior Accomplishment for her outstanding business achievements, mentorship, leadership and promotion of the Holstein breed. She is a long time contributor to the Ontario Dairy Youth Trust Fund. Patty’s passion for the industry goes beyond photography – she is the owner of Silvercap Holsteins that buys, sells, shows and breeds Holstein and Jersey cattle.

Nominated by Byron Beeler ­and Canadian Animal Health Institute

Jean’s unique brand of quiet determination has delivered tremendous leadership to the Canadian animal health industry. For more than 25 years, Jean has led the Canadian Animal Health Institute by skillfully balancing the responsibility of advocating for veterinary pharmaceutical companies with the needs of the veterinarians, livestock producers and public.

One of Jean’s major achievements for Canadian agriculture was closing abused legislative loopholes that permitted importation and use of veterinary pharmaceuticals through Own Use Import and use of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients politics that allowed large quantities of non-Health Canada licensed medications to be imported and used in Canada. Her persistence over more than two decades ultimately brought together all stakeholders, including farmers, industry, veterinarians and regulators.

Jean is an international champion for antimicrobial resistance – an issue of major concern to agriculture that impacts the use of antibiotics in farm and companion animals. She’s been instrumental in ensuring antimicrobials are used properly as part of a One Health approach to human and animal antibiotic use in Canada.

Jean’s passion for public trust in Canadian agriculture guides her work on numerous industry boards including the Canadian Centre for Food Integrity and the Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare at the University of Guelph. An articulate problem solver, Jean has earned the trust and respect of government regulators in Canada, the U.S. and Europe.

AgTech StartUp Uses Lasers To Improve Artificial Insemination In Dairy Cows

/>An AgTech startup in New Zealand, Engender Technologies has created a new microfluidic and photonic technology to sort livestock sperm by sex to enrich X chromosome-bearing bull sperm cells.

The new technology uses lasers to orient sperm cells and look inside those sperm cells as well as separate them based on the presence of an X or a Y chromosome. In contrast to the industry’s standard practice of using an electric charge and field in the artificial insemination process, Engender’s technology uses a wavelength of light to sort cells-on-a-chip. The company believes this will reduce the negative impact on the fertility rate of sperm cells sorted through its system and give dairy farmers great control over offspring.

Engender has raised a total of $6 Million in equity funding including $4.5 Million Series A in 2016. Investors include Pacific Channel, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund, and several angel investment groups. Engender has also received more than $10 million from the New Zealand government in grant funding.

“New Zealand, with its strong farming traditions, is producing some world-leading agri-technology companies,” said Richard Dellabarca, CEO, New Zealand Venture Investment Fund. “Engender Technologies is a spin-off from the University of Auckland. It is commercializing microfluidic and photonic technology to improve sorting of sperm by sex for the trillion dollar livestock market, and is building its funding platform to accelerate its development.”

A reduction in fertility has a substantial impact where farmers don’t use hormones to prolong a cow’s milking, which is the majority of markets, as cows must calve each year to continue lactating. According to Engender, this is particular to pasture-based dairy systems because a pregnancy must occur within a narrow window for the calves to be born in the spring months. When a farmer wants to expand their herd, fertility reductions impact growth of the herd.

“Engender has an opportunity to substantially reduce the cost of production regarding requiring less capital cost, offering increased fertility rates and the opportunity for artificial insemination companies to introduce competitive pricing into the industry,” added Dellabarca.

The company signed a $1 Million deal with Asia’s biggest animal genetics company in March 2017. In 2016, Engender won an AgFunder Innovation award and the Ag-Tech Sector of the World Cup Tech Challenge in Silicon Valley.

Toyota Is Building A Power Station In California That Converts Cow Manure Into Hydrogen Fuel

Toyota has long been committed to developing hydrogen-power stations across the U.S. to provide energy for its line of electric fuel-cell vehicles, such as its Class 8 drayage truck and its Mirai Sedan which emit only water vapor. It already has 31 retail hydrogen stations open in California.

On Thursday, Toyota took an exciting new step towards that commitment and announced plans to construct the world’s first 100% renewable energy-powered fuel-cell plant and hydrogen fueling station

The station, named Tri-Gen, will be operational by 2020 and will support all fuel cell vehicles working in Toyota’s facility in the Port of Long Beach. It will produce enough energy to power nearly 2,350 homes and 1,500 vehicles.

Tri-Gen will be fueled primarily by California’s agricultural waste, including dairy farm manure:

“In most states, you have a conventional natural gas pipeline network that provides heat for your stove or furnace. The majority of natural gas comes from drilling for well gases,” said Matt McClory, senior engineer with Toyota research and development. “We’re trying to green up this process. One way is to find renewable sources, like from gases emitted from landfills, wastewater treatment plants and farm animals.”

For this project, Toyota will source renewable methane from agricultural waste, primarily from dairy farm manure in California, said McClory, who graduated from high school in Lemoore, Calif., known for its dairy cattle operations.

Manufacturers continue to lead the way in advancing energy efficiency and sustainability efforts that positively impact manufacturing and the industry’s contributions to environmental protection. The announcement from Toyota is another step in the company’s own commitment to reduce the level of emissions from its commercial freight. From Bloomberg:

Tri-Gen marks an expansion in Toyota’s effort to harness hydrogen to help the state of California cut pollution from hauling of commercial freight, especially at major ports. The ports of Long Beach, Los Angeles and Oakland handle 40 percent of U.S. container traffic, with commercial shipments generating half of California’s toxic diesel-soot emissions and 45 percent of the nitrogen oxide that plagues L.A. with the nation’s worst smog.

Matt Lauer may lose ownership of his farm amid sexual misconduct allegations

After women came forward to accuse former NBC Today show host Matt Lauer of sexual misconduct, the backlash has been mighty and swift.

He lost his $20m position as anchor on the flagship morning show, his squeaky clean reputation, and now – perhaps – his farm.

Lauer could be forced to sell the 27,180-acre-sheep-and-cattle farm he and his wife purchased in New Zealand in February because of the country’s strict laws on foreign investors having good character.

According to Page Six, New Zealand’s overseas investment regulator is looking into the allegations made against Lauer, as part of a review of his purchase of a large South Island farm.

That’s because foreign investors need to be of “good character”, according to the country’s Overseas Investment Office, which confirmed it was seeking further information on Lauer.

Lisa Barrett, deputy chief executive of policy and overseas Investment, confirmed the “good character” investigation following Lauer’s removal from NBC News, saying: “A condition of the consent granted to Orange Lakes Ltd to purchase the lease for Hunter Valley Station is that the individuals with control of that company must continue to be of good character.”

The key word being continue.

Although the purchase was approved by the investment office in February, “the regulator has the power to enforce the sale of property if it determines that the ‘good character’ requirement is not met.”

This means that if Lauer’s recent behaviour does not meet the “good character” standards he will be required to sell his farm.

And his chances aren’t looking good – earlier this week, the New Zealand government announced tougher standards for sales of farmland to foreigners.

Associate finance minister David Parker, defending the tougher rules, said, “We believe it’s a privilege to own New Zealand land and that we shouldn’t just be selling it willy-nilly to overseas buyers.”

Matt Lauer said there is “enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed”

Lauer, who issued an apology on Wednesday for his actions, said, “Some of what is being said about me is untrue or mischaracterised, but there is enough truth in these stories to make me feel embarrassed and ashamed.”

As for the damage he has caused, Lauer insists that although “repairing the damage will take a lot of time and soul-searching,” he is committed to the effort, and now views it as his “full-time job.”

Which, if he no longer owns a demanding farm on the other side of the world, he’ll have more free time to dedicate to his new gig – rectifying the damage he has caused.

Reese Burdette doing really, really well’ since kidney transplant

Reese Burdette was deemed a “superstar” Wednesday in the ninth day since she underwent a kidney transplant.

Reese, 10, traveled with her mother to Johns Hopkins Hospital for follow-up bloodwork to assess her kidney function.

“She is doing really, really well. They were really happy with how it looked, and called her a superstar,” said her mother, Claire Burdette.

Family friend Alyssa Hussey donated a kidney to Reese on Nov. 20.

The Mercersburg girl, who was burned in a 2014 house fire, had been in renal failure since September 2016.

“To look at her (now), you would not know she had any surgery, let alone major surgery,” Claire Burdette said.

Reese spent nearly two years in the hospital after the fire, ending with a splashy homecoming in her hometown. She was discharged from the latest transplant-related stay Friday.

She now will spend 100 days in isolation on her family’s farm, but can learn alongside Mercersburg Elementary School classmates using a robot with videoconferencing capabilities.

Claire Burdette said Reese’s appetite is better, and she has more energy since undergoing the seven-hour surgery.

When her kidney function was diminished, Reese was limited in how much she could drink each day. Doctors now want her to consume three liters of fluids daily to flush the donated kidney.

“That’s a challenge we can do,” Claire Burdette said.

‘Forgotten Farms’ screening puts spotlight on struggles of local dairy farmers

UConn Extension and Connecticut Farm Bureau Young Farmers hosted a showing of the documentary film “Forgotten Farms” on Wednesday in the Student Union Theater. The documentary shed light on the largely ignored dairy farmers of New England, while also examining the divide between the new food movement and traditional farming. Following the film was a panel discussion featuring local farmers.

The documentary, directed by Dave Simonds and produced by Sarah Gardner, gave the spotlight to several dairy farms across New England, including Chenail Bros. Dairy, Escobar Farm and Herrick Dairy Farm. All of the farms were family run, and it was extremely apparent that each farmer wouldn’t choose any other occupation, no matter how many struggles they faced.

Dairy farming is not easy work, and many farmers do not receive adequate salaries for all of the hard work they put in. This forces a lot of farms to have to shut down, which is extremely negative for New England’s agriculture.

“Most of New England’s agriculture is under threat,” Gardner explained in the film. New England has lost over 10,000 dairy farms in the past 50 years and fewer than 2,000 farms remain. They own about 1.2 million acres of farmland and produce almost all of the milk consumed in New England. About 100 years ago, New England dairy farmers owned over 16 million acres of farmland. With climate changes, New England may need to begin sustaining itself more and more, and this loss of land could be detrimental.

Throughout the film, the struggles that dairy farmers face were discussed. Despite dairy farms making up a large portion of New England’s agriculture, they are often largely ignored when agriculture in the United States is discussed. Often, much smaller-scale local farms are the ones being celebrated, and while this is not wrong, the much larger dairy farms are the ones who are producing the majority of the products we consume. They not only manage 75 percent of our farmland, but also are the ones sustaining our food supply and the farm economy. Therefore, they deserve larger recognition, and this documentary works towards helping remove their negative stigma.

“You gotta be out there every day… there’s no vacations,” one farmer said in the film.

Many other farmers also expressed the hard labor that goes into dairy farming.

“It doesn’t matter what the weather is like, or how you’re feeling, those animals need you,” another farmer said.

The film also explored the tensions between the new food movement and commercial farming. Despite initial skepticism against one another, it was clear that there was some still some basis of mutual understanding. No matter what, they are all still farmers and this gives them some common ground. A local food system that can actually effectively sustain everyone will need help from all farmers, not one or the other.

“Before coming, I knew nothing about farms… I think it’s important to know where your food comes from, so I wanted to learn more… it’s important to diversify your opinions,” Mara Tu, a first-semester environmental major, said. “The documentary really explained a lot about dairy farming.”

Following the film was a panel discussion, including Simonds, Bonnie Burr, who is the department head of UConn Extension, and two local farmers. They discussed the importance of New England agriculture, the importance of knowing where your milk is coming from and especially the development of sustainable farming.

“We are constantly evolving,” Burr said. “We are constantly researching for new information to create a really wholesome product… setting a high bar is important.”

Burr also touched on the financial struggles farmers face.

“If you take away a farmer’s profit, he’s going out of business and his land is becoming developed into houses,” Burr said.

In the film, many farmers discussed that due to high prices or grain and low selling prices of milk, it can be extremely difficult to break even. This is contributing to the rapid decrease of farms and farmland.

The event was open to the public, and learning more about the farmers opened some students’ eyes to how important dairy farming is.

“I decided to come because I’m an environmental science major and I wanted to see how farming impacts climate change, I have heard that it is a factor in energy consumption and I wanted to see the farmers’ side of it… I now know that farms are so demonized and it’s wrong,” said Natalie Roach, a first-semester environmental sciences and human rights major. “It’s so important to talk to the people who are directly involved.”

Happiness is farming and family

I first met Kurt “Buzz” Flannery at a farm auction in May, 1997. He had just bought four rather high priced cows ($1600 – 1700 each) during a period of very low milk prices ($10.70 per hundred). “I came to buy high quality cows — these are milking well right now and will make me money down the road,” he said.

Flannery was milking 60 cows at the time — about the state herd average in 1997 — in a tie stall barn.

“How do you plan to stay in business in coming years, was my question? (Dairy herd expansions were running full speed ahead at the time and small dairies were trying to figure out their future, if any.)

“My brothers, Randy and Harlan, my cousin, Marco, and my mother, Marylyn, each own separate farms but we use one set of farm equipment,” Buzz explained. “That’s our key to running individual dairy farms, I’m optimistic about the future.”