Traditional recipes

Apero Opens in London

Apero Opens in London

The Mediterranean restaurant opens in the historic Ampersand Hotel in South Kensington

Located in the original 19th-century vaults of The Ampersand Hotel, Apero, a modern Mediterranean restaurant inspired by the Italian tradition of the aperitivo, has opened in London.

Chef Chris Golding, formerly of Galoupet, has created a daily-changing menu of shared plates, including gnocchi with rainbow chard and smoked scamorza; cured mackerel, purple potatoes, fennel, pistachio and candied lemon; and green apple and castelfranco leaf.

Pastry Chef Ji Sun Shin, the former sous chef at Nobu, has created the dessert menu that includes set buttermilk with lavender and peach; olive oil, pistachio, and vanilla cake with vanilla ice cream; and lemon posset with churros.

The Ampersand Hotel first opened in 1888 and re-launched this year after a full renovation.

Lauren Mack is the Travel Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow her on Twitter @lmack.


Aperol Spritz the perfect summer cocktail

An Aperol Spritz is probably the perfect summer tipple. Bright orange in colour and with a combination of sweet liqueur and white wine or fizzy Prosecco, it's refreshing with a bitter-sweet after taste.

What is Aperol?

Originating from Italy, Aperol is an infusion of herbs and roots with two of its most distinctive flavours being oranges and rhubarb.

But Aperol is also an incredibly light liqueur, with its alcohol content only 11%.

&lsquoIt's best enjoyed during aperitivo hour, when celebrating the end of the workday with friends, along with delicious Italian &lsquocicchetti&rsquo small plates,' says Loris Contro, Italian Brands Ambassador for Campari UK.

And to celebrate its 100th birthday this year, Aperol has officially made it into the Oxford English Dictionary, Aperol os defined as "A proprietary name for: an orange-coloured Italian aperitif flavoured with gentian, rhubarb, and a variety of herbs and roots."

Soda, served from a syphon or chilled bottle

How to make an Aperol Spritz

While many believe the 3:2:1 method is the way to go, the team at Aperol told Good Housekeeping that we should be moving to the 50:50 method instead. They believe the new recipe enhances the flavour of an Aperol Spritz and also mirrors its Italian heritage.

  1. Fill tall balloon or wine glasses generously with cubed ice
  2. Combine Prosecco followed by Aperol in equal parts
  3. Add a splash of soda
  4. Garnish with a slice of orange &ndash and an olive on a stick, if you're doing it the way they serve it in Venice.

What's apero, and why you should adopt this French tradition

If you’re looking to make festive get-togethers really special this year, why not add some French flair to your celebrations by hosting an ‘apéro hour’?

Bardinet brandy has teamed up with Francophile author and French food and drink specialist Janine Marsh, to uncover the secrets of this great French tradition – and to introduce Brits to the new trend of ‘Whatsapéro’ that’s growing in popularity across France.

She said: "‘L’heure d’apéro’ – an hour of ‘apéritif’ drinks - is a sacred French ritual that brings friends and family together at the end of the working day, to pause, chat and enjoy some delicious pre-dinner drinks and nibbles. Says Janine, it’s all about creating a sense of occasion and celebration that’s so much more than a solo glass of wine at the end of the day.

"As a life-long fan of all things French, and having lived in France for many years, I can say that one of my absolute favourite traditions is Apéro – and particularly so at Christmas time. It’s such a special experience. Here are my tips:

Apéro isn’t just wine and Champagne – it’s about fun and celebration, conviviality and cocktails. And it’s the perfect excuse to try your mixology skills at home. Brandy – or the water of life as it’s called in France – is often thought of as an after dinner drink, but it’s perfect for mixing up a range of special ‘aperitif’ cocktails.

Crisps, nuts and olives are typical Apéro nibbles, but Christmas is a time to make something more special and scrumptious that’s quick and easy to prepare and adds a little je ne sais quoi to your get together. Try Gougères, silky, cheesy balloons of deliciousness, see recipe below. Mini croques (cheese and ham toasties) take just minutes to put together. And brandy snaps add a sweet and irresistible flavour.

Getting together is more important than ever so try ‘Whatsapéro’ over WhatsApp, Zoom, Skype or FaceTime if you can’t do it in person. Why not send out your invitation and make it even more special by gifting guests a bottle of something or let them know what to bring, including ingredients for a delicious cocktail and nibbles. It’s a great way to inspire new festive traditions with your favourite people – even when you’re far apart.

Remember to set the scene and chat! First and foremost, Apéro is about catching up with friends and family, sharing news and having fun. Tempting as it might be to talk politics, it’s probably best avoided to keep the fun vibe alive! With everyone chatting, beware it can be hard to hear if you all talk over each other. You can even play games such as charades, quizzes and virtual karaoke, belting out your favourite numbers in your front room – unforgettable!

To create some French ambience use music. Choose some French artists to bring a frisson of French harmony to your Apéro - funky modern, chilled out or old school tunes. My top three apéro tracks are: Django Reinhardt’s Minor Swing, Dernière Danse by Indila, La Mer by Charles Trenet."

UK brandy Bardinet, crafted just outside Bordeaux since 1857, has a stylish new bottle arriving in the UK in time for the festive season.

To complement Janine’s Apéro tips, French mixologist Arnaud Volte from The London EDITION hotel has created two easy to make Bardinet Brandy cocktails that are guaranteed to impress your guests.

Bardinet Pomme Canelle

2020: Bardinet Finest French Brandy Christmas Cocktails. Pictured a Pomme Canelle Spritz. (Photograph: MAVERICK PHOTO AGENCY)

Apple and cinnamon are really festive flavours that match really well with the vanilla and dry fruits notes of Bardinet Brandy.

In a pan, heat up the water and sugar until the sugar is dissolved. Cut and add the sticks, infuse for 10 to 15 minutes. Let it cool before straining.

Mix all the ingredients in a wine glass and top with soda. Garnish with a slice of lemon wedge and a cinnamon stick.

2020: Bardinet Finest French Brandy Christmas Cocktails. Pictured a Bardinet & Ginger. (Photograph: MAVERICK PHOTO AGENCY)

Mix 50ml Bardinet Brandy with ginger ale in a highball glass.

Garnish with a sprig of rosemary.

These choux pastry cheesy puffs are indecently scrumptious and mouth-wateringly moreish.

To make 25 bite-sized gougères

125g grated hard cheese - Comté or Gruyère is ideal

In a pan bring the water, milk, butter and salt to the boil. Remove from the heat when the butter is melted and stir in the flour. It looks a bit like mashed potato at this stage and is ready when the mix comes away from the side of the pan and forms a ball. Leave it to cool for 3 minutes.

Add the beaten eggs one at a time until you have a smooth paste. Stir in the grated cheese.

Either pipe or use a tablespoon to transfer the mix into walnut-sized rounds onto a baking tray lined with grease proof paper. Leave at least 2 inches between them as they puff up quite a lot.

Bake in the oven at 200˚C/Gas Mark 6 for 20-25minutes, until they are a lovely golden colour. Eat warm from the oven for maximum pleasure!


How to make Aperol Spritz &ndash the perfect summer cocktail

Discover the simple ratio for making the perfect Aperol spritz.

The Aperol spritz is a refreshing cocktail that, while reminiscent of summer, can be enjoyed year-round. It's moreishly sweet, a little bit bitter and deliciously refreshing, transporting us to the picturesque, sun-soaked shores of Italy. A mix of orange, herbs and roots, Aperol's secret recipe has become synonymous with the popular prosecco cocktail.

Here we show you how to make an Aperol Spritz &ndash it's so easy! While our proportions are for one &ndash serve in a balloon glass or large wine glass &ndash it's easy to multiply for a jug of Aperol spritz should you need a party cocktail.

The Aperol Spritz conjures up images of pure Italian glamour, making us want to channel our inner Sophia Loren and zoom around the Amalfi Coast in a pastel-coloured Fiat.But while it evokes such passionate, complex images, the cocktail is surprisingly simple to make, being concocted using only three ingredients.

The drink being so simple means, like us, you've probably tried to make one at home, but the key to the perfect, refreshing Aperol Spritz is getting the measurements just right.

The ratio for the perfect spritz has changed recently. It used to be the ratio 75:50:25 &ndash so that's 75ml of prosecco, 50ml of Aperol and 25ml of soda water. But recently, Aperol says the perfect spritz really needs equal parts Aperol and prosecco with a dash of soda.

If you really want to impress your Aperol loving pals when you serve this up, here are some fun facts:

- Aperol was first launched in 1919

- The name comes from the Italian slang for aperitif, which is apero

- To follow the tradition of an aperitif it should be served with little snacks or ''cicchetti''

Looking for more cocktail recipes? Check out our margarita, espresso martini and mojito recipes.


Restaurant Review: Apero Restaurant & Bar in South Kensington, London

Apero is a subterranean restaurant/bar off Harrington Road, just a stone’s through from the South Kensington Tube. First opened in 2012, it occupies a 19th century vault below the smart boutique Ampersand Hotel. Hotel guests will find it at the bottom of the stairs, a right turn just before the library. For the rest of us, there’s an inconspicuous door from the street, which opens automatically as you approach it as if by invisible commisionaire. A walk down a flight of stairs takes you to what appears very much like a welcoming mediterranean kitchen but with less of the manic bustle, more of a vibrant buzz from diners and the rumble of the underground. The restaurant is small (40 covers) and it’s simple but stylish – from the white tiled, exposed brick walls to the aproned waiters in their uniform of smart blue jeans and shirts.

I took along my partner as a dining guest – as a vegetarian, we wanted to see what the restaurant could offer him. On arriving we received a friendly welcome – even when I realised that I’d come a day early (and announced that my other half was a veggie) – and we were seated without a fuss. The atmosphere was relaxed and there was a mixed crowd in that evening – from tourists to locals enjoying cocktails in the bar.

Apero means aperitif and, in honour of that French tradition, we began the evening with cocktails. All the drinks on the menu are inspired by historic South Ken residents, which I found cheesy but charming. I tried the Vintage Marmalade (£9.50) – a long drink dedicated to actor and theatre manager Sir Nigel Playfair, made with blood oranges and El Jimador Bianco tequila. Scotch and film lovers alike should try the Adventure Malagache (£9.50) in honour of the master of suspense Alfred Hitchcock. The drink is an unusual but incredibly clever taste combination of Jura Superstition whisky and…wait for it… smoked popcorn. The bar area was certainly the most buzzing part of the restaurant that evening – I think the cocktails must be a popular post-workday draw for the locals.

The braised ox cheek with truffle and parmesan potato puree. Image copyright – Amy Murrell

The food menu doesn’t overcomplicate ingredients but still manages to produce fantastically strong flavours. Head Chef Mark Woolgar is relatively new to the post but brings with him a wealth of experience from Australia, Thailand and the UAE.

The best dish of the entire evening for me appeared the simplest on the menu – Burrata, a delicious cheese made with mozzarella and cream that melts in the middle. This was served with a beautiful tricolour of flavoursome Isle of Wight tomatoes and an avocado puree (£6.50). The menu is designed to be shared but it was hard to part company with this dish.

We also opted for the aubergine, tomato and smoked mozzarella roll (£7.00), followed by Gnocchi with rainbow chard and butternut squash (£7 or £13.50) I tried the oven baked cod with black olive crust and saffron fondant potato (£14) but then had no room left for the menu’s meatier offerings – including braised ox cheek with truffle and parmesan potato puree (£16.50), guinea fowl with soft polenta and gremolata (£14.50) and Dingley Dell Pork Rib-eye (£15).

The very theatrical almond and peanut praline mousse with banana cake and Jack Daniels wood chip ice-cream. Image copyright – Amy Murrell

We did, however, find a small space for the desserts designed by Apero’s Pastry Chef Ji Sun Shin, who began her career with Marco Pierre White at Mirabelle before moving to Nobu in Park Lane and then Apero. Her latest creations include the theatrical almond and peanut praline mousse with banana cake and Jack Daniels wood chip ice-cream (£7). The dish comes to the table in an air-tight jar that, when opened, releases an incredible whiskey smoke.

We also chose the extraordinary vegan cacao cube, avocado and lime cream, blackberry vinegar and beetroot reduction, with the most delicious redcurrant sorbet I have ever tasted (£7). The elements were neatly contained in a ‘chocolate sphere’ which cracked satisfyingly under my spoon like an egg shell.

Lastly, a quick note on the wines, which are either of the French, Italian or Spanish persuasion and are reasonably priced between £19.50 and £54.

Apero offers fine dining without pretension. It’s certainly worth a visit whether you’re looking for a ‘foodie’ experience or just a good drink.


Aperol Spritz

Walk through an Italian town during the late-afternoon—particularly in Northern cities like Milan and Venice—and you’ll find groups of people enjoying Aperol Spritzes. The after-work spritz is a long-established Italian tradition, and fortunately, it’s one that’s easily replicated anywhere.

Aperol traces its roots back to Padua, Italy. The aperitivo—an appetite-whetting beverage designed to be consumed before dinner—was created in 1919. Its bittersweet flavor, aromatic botanicals and easygoing alcohol content (it’s only 11% ABV) made it the perfect choice for pre-dinner sipping.

Pair Aperol with bubbly wine and sparkling water, and you’ll be hard-pressed to find a more refreshing and thirst-quenching cocktail. And because it’s low in alcohol, you can start drinking early and still make it to dinner.

While the Aperol Spritz has been enjoyed in Italy for more than a century, it didn’t reach mass appeal in the United States until the 2010s, as drinkers became more familiar with aperitivos and lower-alcohol drinks. Today, it’s a staple at cocktail bars, Italian and non-Italian restaurants, and it can be found almost anywhere that serves brunch on sunny patios.

The Aperol Spritz is also a great candidate for at-home cocktail hour since it’s as easy to make as it is to drink. The three ingredients are simply combined in the glass with ice, no shaking, stirring or elaborate flourishes required. Once complete, the drink’s deliciously complex flavor and gorgeous coral hue belie you having created a classic cocktail in two minutes.

While any sparkling wine can be combined with Aperol and soda, note that a true Aperol Spritz calls specifically for Italian bubbly. Proseccos range from sweet to dry, so choose one that hits the sweetness level you prefer. Then make yourself a drink and relax. You might not be in Italy, but with a good cocktail in hand, you can at least channel the country’s long-standing tradition of aperitivo hour.


What's apero, and why you should adopt this French tradition

If you’re looking to make festive get-togethers really special this year, why not add some French flair to your celebrations by hosting an ‘apéro hour’?

Bardinet brandy has teamed up with Francophile author and French food and drink specialist Janine Marsh, to uncover the secrets of this great French tradition – and to introduce Brits to the new trend of ‘Whatsapéro’ that’s growing in popularity across France.

She said: "‘L’heure d’apéro’ – an hour of ‘apéritif’ drinks - is a sacred French ritual that brings friends and family together at the end of the working day, to pause, chat and enjoy some delicious pre-dinner drinks and nibbles. Says Janine, it’s all about creating a sense of occasion and celebration that’s so much more than a solo glass of wine at the end of the day.

"As a life-long fan of all things French, and having lived in France for many years, I can say that one of my absolute favourite traditions is Apéro – and particularly so at Christmas time. It’s such a special experience. Here are my tips:

Apéro isn’t just wine and Champagne – it’s about fun and celebration, conviviality and cocktails. And it’s the perfect excuse to try your mixology skills at home. Brandy – or the water of life as it’s called in France – is often thought of as an after dinner drink, but it’s perfect for mixing up a range of special ‘aperitif’ cocktails.

Crisps, nuts and olives are typical Apéro nibbles, but Christmas is a time to make something more special and scrumptious that’s quick and easy to prepare and adds a little je ne sais quoi to your get together. Try Gougères, silky, cheesy balloons of deliciousness, see recipe below. Mini croques (cheese and ham toasties) take just minutes to put together. And brandy snaps add a sweet and irresistible flavour.

Getting together is more important than ever so try ‘Whatsapéro’ over WhatsApp, Zoom, Skype or FaceTime if you can’t do it in person. Why not send out your invitation and make it even more special by gifting guests a bottle of something or let them know what to bring, including ingredients for a delicious cocktail and nibbles. It’s a great way to inspire new festive traditions with your favourite people – even when you’re far apart.

Remember to set the scene and chat! First and foremost, Apéro is about catching up with friends and family, sharing news and having fun. Tempting as it might be to talk politics, it’s probably best avoided to keep the fun vibe alive! With everyone chatting, beware it can be hard to hear if you all talk over each other. You can even play games such as charades, quizzes and virtual karaoke, belting out your favourite numbers in your front room – unforgettable!

To create some French ambience use music. Choose some French artists to bring a frisson of French harmony to your Apéro - funky modern, chilled out or old school tunes. My top three apéro tracks are: Django Reinhardt’s Minor Swing, Dernière Danse by Indila, La Mer by Charles Trenet."

UK brandy Bardinet, crafted just outside Bordeaux since 1857, has a stylish new bottle arriving in the UK in time for the festive season.

To complement Janine’s Apéro tips, French mixologist Arnaud Volte from The London EDITION hotel has created two easy to make Bardinet Brandy cocktails that are guaranteed to impress your guests.

Bardinet Pomme Canelle

2020: Bardinet Finest French Brandy Christmas Cocktails. Pictured a Pomme Canelle Spritz. (Photograph: MAVERICK PHOTO AGENCY)

Apple and cinnamon are really festive flavours that match really well with the vanilla and dry fruits notes of Bardinet Brandy.

In a pan, heat up the water and sugar until the sugar is dissolved. Cut and add the sticks, infuse for 10 to 15 minutes. Let it cool before straining.

Mix all the ingredients in a wine glass and top with soda. Garnish with a slice of lemon wedge and a cinnamon stick.

2020: Bardinet Finest French Brandy Christmas Cocktails. Pictured a Bardinet & Ginger. (Photograph: MAVERICK PHOTO AGENCY)

Mix 50ml Bardinet Brandy with ginger ale in a highball glass.

Garnish with a sprig of rosemary.

These choux pastry cheesy puffs are indecently scrumptious and mouth-wateringly moreish.

To make 25 bite-sized gougères

125g grated hard cheese - Comté or Gruyère is ideal

In a pan bring the water, milk, butter and salt to the boil. Remove from the heat when the butter is melted and stir in the flour. It looks a bit like mashed potato at this stage and is ready when the mix comes away from the side of the pan and forms a ball. Leave it to cool for 3 minutes.

Add the beaten eggs one at a time until you have a smooth paste. Stir in the grated cheese.

Either pipe or use a tablespoon to transfer the mix into walnut-sized rounds onto a baking tray lined with grease proof paper. Leave at least 2 inches between them as they puff up quite a lot.

Bake in the oven at 200˚C/Gas Mark 6 for 20-25minutes, until they are a lovely golden colour. Eat warm from the oven for maximum pleasure!


People always ask me what made me want to start my own business. While there was no specific moment the urge struck me, growing up in Silicon Valley certainly imbued me with an entrepreneurial spirit.

And now that I run a business, I enjoy meeting and networking with others who do the same. This week I had the opportunity to do so at a dinner for founders at Apero restaurant in London.

The Ampersand Hotel in London

I arrived at The Ampersand Hotel on Wednesday evening. It’s located right by the South Kensington tube station and has great spaces for everything from dining to afternoon tea.

A host showed me to the Games Room, an intimate private dining room where I met my dinner companions. Among these was the founder of a company that offers exclusive London experiences.

I kicked the evening off with a glass of bubbly as he introduced me to the other founders in attendance. There was a diverse group of people from angel investors to marketers and entrepreneurs.

The commonality between us was that we had each created something, be it a product, a service, or a variety of funding opportunities.

When the sparkling wine was finished, our glasses were replaced by a choice of cocktails ranging from an Aperol Spritz to a gin and tonic.

I chose the latter, sipping and enjoying canapes before sitting down at the large central table for dinner.

Dinner at Apero Restaurant in London

The Mediterranean food at Apero restaurant in London was served family-style, with large plates of Italian bread and olive oil arriving first, followed by plump white pillows of burrata.

After we finished them, bowls of pink beetroot risotto with stone bass arrived. Then a course of chicken and pork with fennel appeared. It came with sides of creamy mashed potatoes and braised red cabbage.

The food at Apero restaurant in London was good. It wasn’t spectacular, but it was of a sufficient quality for a dinner that was more focused on networking than on cuisine.

Throughout the evening the conversation flowed, with topics ranging from raising capital to legal issues for start-ups and using social media as a marketing tool.

At the end of dinner at Apero restaurant in London, I felt like I’d met some great new business contacts in an enjoyable atmosphere. And now to be a good networker and follow up with them all…

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What are good apéro drinks and apéro foods?

While I must admit that my tipple of choice is typically a glass of crisp rosé (is there anything that screams ‘summer’ quite like that soft pink hue swirling around in the glass?), you can have an apéro with pretty much any kind of drink, both alcoholic and non alcoholic. However, some great places to start include

Kir Royale: The Kir Royale is a popular French cocktail and is the perfect blend of sweet meets celebratory. Typically made with sparkling wine and a little bit of Cassis, it’s the ideal summer drink. Check here for a Kir Royale recipe.

Aperol Spritz: I must admit that I’m a little partial to a good apérol spritz, especially in the summer months when the sun is shining and I’ve spent the day soaking up the warm rays. The recipe is ever so easy to follow and combines equal parts of Aperol (a bright orange liqueur) with dry prosecco and a dash of soda water. If you don’t have any prosecco, than any dry white wine also works.

A bottle of white wine/ rosé wine: Since this is a light drink to be consumed with snacks as opposed to a full meal, many prefer to stay away from vin rouge (red wine) and instead opt for something such as a bottle of Muscadet (dry white wine) or Chablis or Graves. Alternatively, something a little sweeter like a Lillet could be served.

Considering that an apéritif is meant to ‘whet’ the appetite as opposed to being the main meal of itself, when it comes to the snack selection, you’ll want some light bites that are tasty but not too filling! Great choices include olives, nuts, and potato chips. Over the past few years, I’ve also noticed more and more Parisian cafés serving small bowls of salted popcorn to accompany apéro hour.


Sharing Food with Friends in the Apero Restaurant in London

When visiting a foreign city, it’s always hard to find a good restaurant. Last week I stayed at the fabulous Ampersand Hotel which I reviewed yesterday (read here). In the underground vault of this elegant small luxury hotel houses the restaurant Apero, led by Executive Chef Chris Golding. I’m not a food critic, nor do I claim to be a food expert, but I am quite confident when saying that the food in Apero is high quality, fresh, and above all very tasty!

The Apero restaurant is eye candy for interior design lovers with its bare brick walls, brass and copper pipes, and industrial pendant lamps that softly light the space, and Italian tile floors. The space has an elegant, yet rustic, comfortable and laid back atmosphere, as if being in an Italian brasserie.

Behind the scenes

My friends and I were bold enough to ask for an interview with the chef cook, yet we got more. Chris gave us an exclusive tour in the kitchen, the epicenter, where his colourful food is prepared. We were even given a peek into the freezer where he kept pink lettuce, yellow and red spotted radicchio, the most tasty spring tomatoes from Italy (I’m not a tomatoes fan, but these were to sweet to resist), and special mushrooms from France. He gets his products from small farmers, small local businesses and at top secret markets.

We got to see Dutch cook Christof at work, and chief pastry chef Ji Sun Shin make chocolate treats and bake fresh scones. The scones were to die for! We were even given a cute small box with two of her sweet creations….now that is hospitality! Their love for food and cooking became even more apparent when they rolled up their sleeves to show us their vegetables tattoos.

Chef cook Chris Golding and his team cooked up a scrumptious sharing menu for us. We started with a warm out-of-the-oven focaccia bread and crispy parmesan sticks. Next we got to taste:

  • baked goat cheese with honey truffles
  • baked scallops with seaweed, served in a shell covered with a crust
  • mixed greens salad with those top secret tasty Italian spring tomatoes and the pink lettuce
  • Pappardelle with butter & winter truffle
  • garlic leaves with scamorza (smoked mozzarella)
  • Stone bass, sumac & beetroot risotto

I just can’t describe the flavours, I can tell you that it was heavenly! It was fresh, delicate, and healthy as well. You could taste it was all prepared with love and great care. No pretentious presentation, no fluffy words to describe what you actually get, and you do get rich portions to share. So much, that we had to skip dessert. A reason to go back.

Since we stayed at the hotel, we also had breakfast at the Apero restaurant. Again a feast for your eyes and your taste buds. Fresh banana bread, sweet and savoury pastries, the most fluffy pancakes I ever tasted, and hearty omelettes or scambled eggs with fresh toppings. What better way to start the day?

The creators of all above yummie food are chef cook Chris Golding and his team. Chris sat down with us for an up close and personal interview.

Chris Golding, has worked at a number of London’s best restaurants, including Grangers & Co. in Notting Hill, which was Bill Granger’s first UK restaurant, Nahm, Nobu Berkeley, Mirabelle and The Square, all of which are Michelin-starred. Chris also oversaw the launch of Galoupet in Knightsbridge. Hence he has a lot of experience in a wide array of cuisines and various cooking styles to draw upon.

“I always wanted to be a cook. My mother was a cook at my school and she inspired me to follow in her footsteps”, says Chris. He gets his ideas for recipes from browsing through his more than 500 cookbooks. ” I especially like the Irish classic dishes with seasonal produce”, he says. His signature dish is the beetroot risotto with sea bass. “If I were to choose a select amount of ingredients to take with me to a deserted island I would certainly choose beetroot: You can cook it, eat it raw, cold or hot, make soup, or stew. It’s so versatile. I would also take white pepper”.

Chris believes cooking is all about creative freedom and food should be 80% flavour and 20% visual. He therefore chooses to cook with seasonal products and puts high value on the quality and freshness of his ingredients. “The taste is most important”, he concludes. And that we experienced! Thanks Chris for your hospitality and the excellent food. I’ll be back for dessert soon.

Apero Restaurant & Bar | 2 Harrington Road, London SW7 3ER | T: 0207 591 4410 | E: [email protected]

Special thanks to my blogger friends and travel companions Brigitte Schultze and Dani Gudith for sharing a few of their photos for me to use in this blog post.


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Watch the video: How to Craft the Perfect Charcuterie Board (December 2021).