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10 Best Gluten-Free Beers (Slideshow)

10 Best Gluten-Free Beers (Slideshow)

Just because you're gluten-free doesn't mean you need to give up beer

10. RedBridge

If you’re searching for a gluten-free beer at your local bar, chances are they carry a RedBridge. It’s produced by Anheuser-Busch and is a sorghum-based lager that happens to be the top-selling gluten-free beer on the market in the U.S. RedBridge is also in the process of partnering with The National Foundation for Celiac Awareness to help spread the word about Celiac disease and gluten intolerance.

9. Bard’s

Touted as the world’s first craft gluten-free beer, Bard’s is brewed with a 100 percent malted gluten-free sorghum. Bard’s American lager is made with sorghum, yeast, hops, and water. The company is very conscious about its brewing methods and makes sure the beer contains no wheat, barley, rye, or oats and is naturally gluten-free.

8. Harvester Brewing Company

This Portland, Ore. brewery makes their gluten-free beer out of oats and chestnuts, among other things. Its IPA No. 1 is gaining in popularity and has a piney, citrusy flavor as well as the bitterness that IPAs are known for. Another key ingredient in Harvester’s IPA is organic tapioca maltodextrin.

7. Glutenberg

Montreal-based Glutenberg only makes 100 percent gluten-free beers and uses a dedicated gluten-free facility to brew its product. Consumers can choose from three brews: blonde, American pale ale and red, which is made with chestnuts.

6. Celia Saison

Reminiscent of the rustic farmhouse ales of Belgium, Celia Saison is produced by Ipswich Ale Brewery in Massachusetts. This sorghum-based beer is made with Belgian yeast strain as well as Curaçao orange peels and Celeia hops.

5. Brunehaut

Brunehaut makes several gluten-free varietals including Brunehaut Bio Blonde gluten-free that also happens to be organic and vegan to boot, as is the Brunehaut Amber Ale. These beers are brewed with gluten and then “de-glutenized” during the brewing process, according to its website.

4. Omission

Omission has a tasty line of three craft beers (lager, IPA, and pale ale) brewed with traditional beer ingredients, and specially crafted to remove gluten. The pale ale is bold and hoppy, containing a floral aroma and delicious caramel malt body. The lager is brewed in a traditional lager fashion and the IPA has notable pine, citrus, and grapefruit aromas and flavors.

3. New Planet

The New Planet Beer Company based in Colorado is dedicated to making delicious, gluten-free beer while donating a portion of its profits to environmental efforts. But the planet aside, this line of beer is taking off in the gluten-free community. It offers pale ale, amber ale, blond ale, raspberry ale, Belgian ale, and brown ale. Its pale ale has bold hop flavors coupled with rich caramel, grapefruit notes, and a hoppy finish.

2. Green’s

If anyone knows their beer, it’s the folks in Belgium. Green’s produces nine different gluten-free beers that range from golden ale to IPA to amber. They are currently being brewed by the best of Belgian craft brewers and have the European accreditation of being gluten-free. Green’s Endeavour is quite popular in the gluten-free community for its double dark beer.

1. Estrella Damm Daura

This Spanish gluten-free beer varietal is picking up awards left and right when it comes to its amazing taste. Most recently, the beer won the Superior Taste Award of the International Taste & Quality Institute of Brussels for its third consecutive year. It is the first beer in Spain to guarantee a gluten content below three ppm (products with a gluten content below 20 ppm are suitable for people with celiac disease), according to its website.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.


12 Gluten-Free Beers That Actually Taste Good, According To Nutritionists

Being gluten-free at a beer bar is a lot like being a vegetarian in a steak house. Your options are very, very limited.

Though the distillation process removes gluten from spirits like vodka, beer is not distilled, so you need to exercise caution when pouring a cold one. &ldquoTraditional beer is typically brewed from barley, a gluten-containing grain,&rdquo says E.A. Stewart, RD.

Luckily, brew houses are becoming a big more friendly toward the anti-gluten crowd these days. &ldquoThere's been a rise in gluten-free beers brewed with 100 percent gluten-free grains," says Stewart. Two popular grains used: sorghum and brown rice.

You can also find a number of tasty "gluten-removed" beers out there (Stewart loves Stone Delicious' IPA)&mdashbut since the process used to create these beers may not remove all gluten, people with celiac disease should stick to the truly gluten-free.

Not sure where to start? Try these 12 gluten-free beers nutritionists recommend.

New Planet Brewery makes a variety of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers, and "the gluten-free Blonde Ale contains water, millet, gluten-free oats, maize, cane sugar, hops, and yeast," says Stewart.

At 4.5% ABV (alcohol-by-volume), it's a light and refreshing pick. (For reference, your standard Coors can is 4.2% ABV.)

Per serving: 120 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat fat), 14 g carb, 0 g sugar, 0 mg sodium, 0 g fiber, 0 g protein.

&ldquoI tend to gravitate towards dark, rich beers (a la Guinness), so Ground Breaker's Dark Ale is a natural gluten-free choice,&rdquo says Stewart. &ldquoIt's brewed with unusual ingredients, including dark roasted chestnuts and lentils, which provide a roasted flavor with hints of dark fruit and chocolate.&rdquo

Steadfast Beer Co.'s highly-rated Pale Ale is brewed with sorghum, molasses, and hops&mdashand has a bright, citrusy flavor. Just note that this brew is 6.8% ABV, so sip slowly, says Stewart.

Per serving: 200 cal, 0 g fat (0 g sat), 17 g carbs, 1 g sugar

This one's for you, IPA lovers! Made with brown rice, malted millet, malted buckwheat, and Aramis hops, the naturally gluten-free Plasma Sake IPA by Element Brewing Company promises to taste anything but gluten-free, says dietitian Randy Evans, RDN.

Be prepared for the strong 9.3% ABV of this one.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoOne of a series of gluten-free beers from Departed Soles, A Dark Night is a dark ale designed to taste similar to a Black and Tan,&rdquo says Evans. (That's a wicked combo beer drink made with a pale ale and a stout.) A wintertime go-to, A Dark Night has a nice roasted, warm flavor and is 5% ABV (low for an IPA).

Nutrition information not available.

Made with sweet potatoes, this gluten-free beer has a unique, slightly sweet flavor that some might favor over the usual sorghum-based gluten-free brew, says Evans. This one pairs nicely with lighter foods, like fish, chicken breast, and salad.

Nutrition information not available.

&ldquoDogfish Heads Tweason&rsquoale offers drinkers something fruity with this sorghum-based gluten-free beer," says Evans. "Strawberries, buckwheat, honey, and molasses create a naturally sweet fruit flavor that balances out the sorghum grain.&rdquo

Slightly bitter, the beer is 6.0% ABV and has a finish somewhat akin to an acidic rosé.