Traditional recipes

White asparagus gratin recipe

White asparagus gratin recipe

  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Side dish
  • Vegetable side dishes

This easy, cheesy gratin with only five ingredients can be served as a starter with bread, or as a vegetarian main with boiled baby potatoes.

5 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 1kg white asparagus
  • salt to taste
  • 50g butter, plus more for greasing
  • 2 processed cheese triangles, diced
  • lemon juice to taste
  • pinch of nutmeg

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:40min ›Ready in:1hr

  1. Peel the asparagus with a vegetable peeler from top to bottom, starting below the tips. Remove any woody ends with a knife and cut the spears into bite-sized pieces. Place the asparagus in a large wide pan and cover with lightly salted water. Bring to the boil; reduce heat and simmer gently until the stems are tender and can be easily pierced with a sharp knife, about 20 to 25 minutes. The cooking time varies depending on the thickness of the asparagus. Drain, reserving 125ml of the cooking liquid.
  2. Preheat oven to 180 C / Gas 4. Butter a gratin dish and arrange the asparagus in it.
  3. Pour the reserved cooking liquid into a small saucepan. Heat until simmering; add the butter and stir until it has melted. Add the cheese; stir until melted. Whisk the sauce until smooth and season with lemon juice and nutmeg.
  4. Pour the sauce over the asparagus and bake in the preheated oven until bubbly, about 20 minutes.

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Step 1

Preheat broiler. In a broiler-proof very large skillet stir together the half-and-half, garlic, lemon peel, and salt. Stir in cannellini beans and 1/2 cup of the Parmesan cheese. Bring to boiling, reduce heat, and simmer, uncovered, for 3 to 5 minutes or until slightly thickened. Meanwhile, wrap asparagus spears in bundles of 5 or 6 with prosciutto slices and place bundles on top of bean mixture. Sprinkle with remaining Parmesan cheese. Broil 4 to 6 inches from the heat for 8 to 10 minutes or until browned and asparagus is tender.


Fennel, asparagus and chard gratin recipe

A delicious filling of seasoned vegetables with a crispy parmesan topping.

The 5 Livewell Principles

1. Use meat and dairy imaginatively - use meat as a flavour and add more veggies without compromising on taste

2. Eat more fruit and veg, especially if in season &ndash you will be surprised at the delicious filling dishes that can be make without meat

3. Eat less highly processed foods &ndash they tend to be more resource intensive to produce and often contain high levels of sugar, salt and fat

4. Use every bit &ndash 40% of food ends up in the bin or landfill, so eat everything

5. Buy sustainably &ndash whether that&rsquos MSC fish from well-managed sources or food containing sustainably sourced palm-oil, checking the sustainability of ingredients makes a difference.

Ingredients

  • 4 medium fennel, sliced straight through into eight lengthways
  • 1 bunch of asparagus
  • 500 g chard - approximately 4 large chard leaves
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 pinches salt and black pepper
  • 4 medium fennel, sliced straight through into eight lengthways
  • 1 bunch of asparagus
  • 17.6 oz chard - approximately 4 large chard leaves
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 pinches salt and black pepper
  • 4 medium fennel, sliced straight through into eight lengthways
  • 1 bunch of asparagus
  • 17.6 oz chard - approximately 4 large chard leaves
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 2 pinches salt and black pepper
  • 30 g stale white bread crumbs
  • 40 g parmesan cheese
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely grated
  • 1 stalk of rosemary, finely chopped
  • 1 zest of unwaxed lemon, finely grated
  • 20 hazelnuts, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp chopped curly parsley
  • 1.5 tbsp olive oil
  • 1.1 oz stale white bread crumbs
  • 1.4 oz parmesan cheese
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely grated
  • 1 stalk of rosemary, finely chopped
  • 1 zest of unwaxed lemon, finely grated
  • 20 hazelnuts, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp chopped curly parsley
  • 1.5 tbsp olive oil
  • 1.1 oz stale white bread crumbs
  • 1.4 oz parmesan cheese
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely grated
  • 1 stalk of rosemary, finely chopped
  • 1 zest of unwaxed lemon, finely grated
  • 20 hazelnuts, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp chopped curly parsley
  • 1.5 tbsp olive oil

Details

  • Cuisine: French
  • Recipe Type: Main
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Preparation Time: 10 mins
  • Cooking Time: 25 mins
  • Serves: 4

Step-by-step

  1. Preheat the grill to its hottest setting and place the oven rack approximately half way up.
  2. Meanwhile, boil the sliced fennel for 10 minutes in a pan of boiling water. Remove from the pan and drain thoroughly.
  3. Toss the fennel and asparagus in a bowl with 1 tbsp of olive oil and a little pinch of salt and place in a pan or dish under a hot grill for around 20 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, chop and then boil the chard leaves for 5 minutes and drain thoroughly - press them against the end of the pan with a spoon to get rid of any excess water. Set aside to add to the gratin at the end. Meanwhile mix all the gratin ingredients in a bowl and leave to one side.
  5. Once the fennel and asparagus are cooked and golden brown, remove from the grill. Distribute the boiled chard leaves among the asparagus and fennel. Scatter the gratin mix over the vegetables. Return the dish to the oven and grill until the crumbs are golden brown - around 5 minutes. Serve immediately.

Recipe courtesy of WWF Livewell 2020

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What is Pangrattato?

Hey everyone!! Pangrattato is just the Italian word for ‘bread crumbs’. That’s it. Nothing too fancy here, in fact it’s just the opposite. It is said to have originated in Italy as a ‘poor man’s’ substitute for Parmesan Reggiano and used in place of the precious cheese on pasta and vegetables.

In this recipe I am taking simple leftover dried pangrattato, combining it with herbs, walnuts, and some lemon zest to use as a flavour topping. A quick sauté in oil intensifies flavours, resulting in toasted nutty goodness.

Using bread crumbs as a garnish is the ultimate in low key, non fussy cooking. Pangrattato [pan-grat-tà-to] adds extra flavour to simple dishes like plain spaghetti, baked potatoes with cream (think au gratin), and roasted, boiled, or steamed vegetables.


Steps for preparation

Asparagus Casserole is extraordinarily easy to prepare and can be assembled well in advance of cooking, even up to a day ahead.

Prepare the vegetables

Blanch the asparagus. For veggies, especially green veggies, to keep their color while cooking, we blanch them first. All blanching is is putting the asparagus in boiling water for a minute or two (depending on the thickness of the spears), then transferring directly to ice water to stop the cooking.

Be sure to drain the asparagus very well after the ice bath because we do not want to introduce water into the casserole and have it end up watery.

Cook the mushrooms and onions. This step is done in one skillet. Olive oil is heated and the mushrooms are browned. Then to the mushrooms, a little more olive oil is added and the onion is sautéed with the mushrooms.

Make the Dijon cream sauce

To the same skillet used above (wiped clean), cream and half and half are added, then simmered until thickened. Whisk in the whole grain mustard, Dijon mustard, salt, and pepper, and the sauce is done.

Assemble the casserole and bake

The asparagus, mushrooms, onion, and sauce are combined into a small casserole dish. Once topped with a mixture of panko breadcrumbs, parmesan, and olive oil, the asparagus au gratin (because we put cheese on top!) is baked until all golden, bubbly, and, most importantly, when the asparagus is fork tender.

This last part is the key. Thicker asparagus spears will take longer to cook while thin spears will cook faster. I have done both, and ideally spears that are not baby fine thin or thick like a stick – i.e. right in the middle – work best.

But either way, we make it work. If using thinner spears, blanch only 1 minute and bake the asparagus casserole around 20 minutes. If using thick spears, blanch 2 minutes and cook up to 30 minutes or until whenever they get tender.


White Asparagus Gratin

White asparagus gratin is a popular first course in the spring. Peel the spears carefully, all the way to the top. They are brittle and break easily…. But they are worth it.

  • Author: Katie Zeller
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Total Time: 45 minutes
  • Yield: 2 servings 1 x
  • Category: Vegetable
  • Cuisine: French

Ingredients

  • 10 white or violet asparagus spears, peeled
  • 1 1/2 tbs butter
  • 1 1/2 tbs flour
  • 1 tsp Dijon-style mustard
  • 1 cup ( 8oz , 240ml) milk
  • 3 tbs Greek yogurt or sour cream
  • 1 tsp tarragon
  • 1/4 cup ( 1oz , 30gr) Gruyère cheese, shredded
  • 1 1/2 oz (45gr) bacon, chopped, fried until crisp

Instructions

  • Bring a large pan of water to boil and blanch the asparagus for 5 minutes, 8 minutes if thick.
  • Drain and place in a baking dish just large enough to hold them in a single layer.
  • In a small saucepan, melt butter.
  • Add flour and cook, stirring with a whisk or fork.
  • Slowly add milk, stirring constantly until you have a thick sauce.
  • Stir in mustard.
  • Remove from heat.
  • Take 1/2 cup of the sauce and refrigerate the rest for another use.
  • Stir tarragon and yogurt into the 1/2 cup sauce
  • Pour sauce over asparagus.
  • Sprinkle with cheese, then top with bacon
  • Bake, 400F (200C) for 15 minutes, until the sauce is browned and bubbly.
  • Remove, divide onto 2 plates and serve.

Notes

Use green asparagus if that is what you have available – cut blanching time by 2 minutes and refresh in cold water to maintain the color. It’s not necessary to peel green asparagus.

Keywords: asparagus, gratin

On another subject….. I know you are all anxious to see my Bug House, er, I mean, Insect Hotel.

The top, with the little tubes is for bees, mainly, according to the booklet that came with the hotel, the red mason bee.

The bottom left is for ladybugs (ladybirds for the Brits) and bottom right is for earwigs.

I, personally, find earwigs particularly creepy and did not knowingly by a house for them. However, I have since learned that the earwigs, along with the ladybugs, eat vast quantities of aphids.

My potager is usually blessed with vast quantities of aphids.

It’s supposed to be protected from wind and rain which means I don’t really have a good place next to or in my potager. So I have it on my potting table which is very protected and gets full morning sun.

I haven’t noticed anyone checking in yet, but it’s only been there a few days.

And it may be too late in the season.

Comments

White Asparagus Gratin cooking for two — 7 Comments

You are too late for Orchard Bee Osmia bicornuta and Red Mason Bee O. rufa (btw, I get way more O. bicornuta than O. rufa here, but either are good for pollinating fruit). Other solitary bees, such as various Megachile spp will likely move in. They are the ones who collect the pollen under their abdomen and cut semi-circles out of leaves (usually from your rose bushes) to line their nest with. Also good to have. You may also get a few Mexican Grasshopper Wasps — you will know them because they leave dry grass sticking out from the tubes. They stock their nests with paralysed grasshoppers then block them off with dried grass. They don’t pollinate, they are not native, but they are not a problem.

In terms of aphid munching, hover fly (known as flower flies in North America) larvae are also excellent chompers. And best of all are lacewing larvae — very ferocious on the aphids.

Well, I tried. Next year I will be better prepared. And perhaps the hubs will build some that can be in the actual potager, or near it. It was just to new to us this year. Still, I’m so glad I learned about it.
I have an irrational fear of spiders (but, for some reason, only in the house) but have never been bothered by any of the flying bugs (except mosquitoes) lol

Lovely little house and I see that you can replace the insides. Very good! A nice, clean parasite and disease free spot.

I don’t mind spiders. They eat a huge amount of bad bugs. Especially the hunter spiders. Someone on our township FB group posted a picture of a Wolf Spider that was almost as big in leg span as a two liter bottle of pop. They’d found it while taking a wall in their house down. Of course, the usual “burn it” comments went out though a few actually agreed with me that putting it outside would be the right thing to do. I did posit though that if it was that big, imagine the kind of food source it must have between the walls…the thread got very quiet…

It probably would have been very unhappy outside…. House spiders rather like being in houses. I remember wolf spiders from living in MN on a lake. Here we have European house spiders, which are also very big. and scary. lol And, yes, I know… if there is no food they go elsewhere. There will never be a lack here, I’m afraid.

l love the hotel…cant wait to follow the activities of the inmates …could be a whole new blog !!

I think I’m too late for this year, though…. But I’ll be ready next spring !


Asparagus and Asiago Gratin

This asparagus and Asiago gratin couldn’t be quicker or easier. Asparagus is roasted in the oven and then bread crumbs, lemon zest, cheese, and parsley are sprinkled over the asparagus and roasted just until everything is crisp and buttery and lightly browned.

Adapted from Domenica Marchetti | Rustic Italian | Weldon Owen, 2011

Spring asparagus is a lovely, lovely thing. Yet many of us long ago lost touch with the fact that spring really ought to be redundant in conjunction with asparagus. Think about it. Those skinny, bendy, grassy-smelling spears show up at the farmers market only during–you guessed it–spring, as opposed to those stocky or shriveled bundles lashed together with purple rubber bands and plonked in a bin of stinky water at the supermarket come mid-January. Still, should you find yourself not quite able to hold out for actual spring asparagus, this recipe from one of our favorite cookbook authors stealthily conceals all manner of out-of-season vegetal sins. One last thing. The gratin turns out just as lovely minus the bread crumbs, so take note, those of you who eschew gluten or embrace Passover.–Renee Schettler

*What can I substitute for Asiago fresco?

This asparagus gratin recipe calls for Asiago fresco rather than the more commonly found Asiago you might be used to seeing at your cheese counter. Asiago fresco or (pressato) is a semi-soft cheese with largish, irregular-shaped holes. A thin and elastic crust with soft, buttery, white-yellowish interior that has a taste reminiscent of cream or fresh milk, fresco is the youngest version of Asiago cheese. It tastes sweet, buttery, delicate, and tangy and has a slightly, salty aftertaste. Search out young Asiago, if you can, but if not—Swiss, mild white Cheddar or Fontina will all work. Of course, aged Asiago will too, but won’t give you the creaminess of a younger cheese and it will pack a wallop more salt, so act accordingly.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 cup half-and-half or light cream
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic (2 cloves)
  • 1 tablespoon finely shredded lemon peel
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 15-19 ounce cans cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
  • ¾ cup finely shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1 pound fresh asparagus spears, trimmed
  • 3 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto

Preheat broiler. In a broiler-proof very large skillet* stir together the half-and-half, garlic, lemon peel, and salt. Stir in cannellini beans and 1/2 cup of the Parmesan cheese. Bring to boiling, reduce heat, and simmer, uncovered, for 3 to 5 minutes or until slightly thickened. Meanwhile, wrap asparagus spears in bundles of 5 or 6 with prosciutto slices and place bundles on top of bean mixture. Sprinkle with remaining Parmesan cheese. Broil 4 to 6 inches from the heat for 8 to 10 minutes or until browned and asparagus is tender.

To make your skillet oven and broiler proof, wrap the handle in foil. This will reduce heating and convection.


  • 2 cups shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • 2 cups milk, half & half, or cream (I prefer cream for flavor and texture)
  • 2 pounds of small redskin potatoes, sliced one quarter inch thick - Small golden potatoes or fingerling potatoes may be substituted but young potatoes are necessary for proper texture and to reduce cooking time to tenderness.
  • 1 pound of fresh asparagus spears - Frozen asparagus may be substituted but it must be completely thawed before use.
  • 4 tablespoons of unbleached white flour
  • 4 tablespoons of butter
  • 1 half teaspoon herbes de provence (a mixture of savory, basil, thyme, lavender, and fennel) or the dried herbs of your choice
  • 1 half teaspoon of table salt
  • Fresh ground pepper to taste


  • 4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter, divided, plus more for baking dish
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided, plus more for blanching water
  • 2 pounds fresh asparagus, trimmed
  • ½ teaspoon freshly-ground black pepper, divided
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 ½ cups whole milk
  • 3 ounces Gruyère cheese, grated (about ¾ cup)
  • 3 ounces white cheddar cheese, grated (about ¾ cup)
  • 1 cup Panko (Japanese-style breadcrumbs)

Preheat oven to 400°F with rack in highest position. Butter a 3-quart baking dish.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high. Add half of the asparagus and cook until crisp-tender, 2 to 4 minutes (depending on thickness of spears). Remove with tongs, letting excess water drip off, and transfer to prepared dish. Repeat with remaining asparagus toss with 1 teaspoon of the salt and ¼ teaspoon of the black pepper.

Discard water melt 2 tablespoons of the butter in same pot over medium-low. Whisk in flour and cayenne and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant and slightly darker in color, about 2 minutes. Slowly whisk in milk. Increase heat to medium, and simmer, whisking often, until thickened, about 5 minutes. Slowly add Gruyère, cheddar, ½ teaspoon of the salt, and remaining ¼ teaspoon black pepper, and whisk until cheese is melted. Pour cheese sauce evenly over asparagus.

Melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter in a skillet over medium stir in Panko and remaining ½ teaspoon salt. Scatter over asparagus.

Bake until warmed through, 8 to 10 minutes. Increase oven temperature to broil broil until breadcrumbs are golden brown, 1 to 2 minutes.


Watch the video: Σπαράγγια σαλάτα - Συνταγές από το χωριό (December 2021).