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Beyond Meat Sausages Now in Whole Foods Stores Nationwide

Beyond Meat Sausages Now in Whole Foods Stores Nationwide

Beyond Meat’s new line of plant-based sausages is now available in Whole Foods stores nationwide, the brand has announced. Beyond Sausage is meant to mimic the taste of pork sausage and will be available for $8.99 per 4-pack in three varieties: Original Bratwurst, Hot Italian, and Sweet Italian.

Beyond Sausage uses an algae-based casing to mimic the “snap” of real sausage and a blend of pea, fava bean, and rice proteins to match the texture. The product was introduced in December at Whole Foods’ flagship store in Boulder, Colorado.

The product has since been prominently featured on some restaurant menus, including at Schaller’s Stube next door to the Schaller & Weber German meat market in New York City. The Daily Meal staff had a chance to try Schaller’s version of the sausages in February, and while none of us exactly made plans to go vegan on the spot, most were reasonably pleased with the sausages.

We recently asked Jesse Denes of Schaller's Stube about his experiences serving Beyond Sausage over the past few months. "The customer response has been great," he told us. "There's a passionate fanbase for it — a lot of people willing to come uptown just to try it out."

As for how to cook Beyond Sausage, we noticed in our February tasting that the casing is somewhat less firm than the genuine article, and Denes confirms that it helps to prepare these sausages with a bit more care. Schaller's Stube typically boils meat sausages to bring them to temp before grilling, whereas they've been heating Beyond Sausage with a sous-vide technique, as they don't hold together quite as well in water.

Schaller & Weber plans to carry the sausages once they're available to retailers other than Whole Foods. In the meantime, they'll stay on the menu at Schaller's Stube.

Beyond Meat has eagerly reached out beyond vegan circles to pitch its products as a tasty plant-based option for all diners. Their Beyond Burger, touted as a more responsible and healthful yet still satisfying alternative to beef, has made its way onto supermarket shelves and restaurant menus across the country, including at burger-centric chains like Bareburger and TGI Fridays; California-based Luna Grill raised some hackles recently by topping the otherwise-vegan patty with feta cheese.

If Beyond Meat’s new product is as successful as they hope, people might soon be talking about the nation’s best plant-based sausages the way we’re already talking about America’s best restaurant veggie burgers.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


This Sizzling, Meat-Like Vegan Sausage Is Finally Available at Every Whole Foods

Beyond Meat, the futuristic vegan meat brand that made waves with its bleeding burger—it was beet juice y𠆚ll—just announced this morning that it will be expanding its relatively new line of products, Beyond Sausage, to Whole Foods stores nationwide.

Why is this news? There have been plant-based sausage brands around for a long time. They&aposve mostly been seitan-based: think category favorite Field Roast and MorningStar, best known for their frozen burgers and sausages. Tofu Pups, a satirized but solid effort at replicating the hot dog experience, has also been a mainstay. Beyond Meat sausages, however, seem to be the first and most widely available vegan sausage on the market that actually resembles raw meat when cold and then turn pink when cooked. This is more than just aesthetic placating for vegans: the product’s semipermeable membrane also lets fat sizzle through during the cooking process, releasing fat and aromas that more closely replicates the experience of meat than any other sausage product on the market. The curve of the sausage—which has a spring just like its animal-derived counterparts that are curved due to the elasticity of the traditional intestinal casing—is due to its curved mold.

Cut into the sausage, and you’ll see globules of fat—stabilized coconut oil𠅊nd variation in texture mimicking tendon and muscle. Field Roast and Tofu Pups, by contrast, are texturally homogenous.

All this is thanks to the team of ex-cancer researchers Beyond Meat has at its Los Angeles-area headquarters, studying color proteins and aroma compounds to extraordinary detail. (We went behind the scenes to tour the lab: Read all about it here.)

So far, we’ve made no mention of Impossible Burger, which is Beyond Meat’s equally tech-forward competitor. The company does not (yet) have a sausage product, and so far its burgers, endorsed by the likes of David Chang, are only available at restaurants (including White Castle), not supermarkets. It also contains heme, a compound whose safety has been debated.


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