Traditional recipes

15 Best Snack Foods for Diabetics

15 Best Snack Foods for Diabetics

Healthy snacking doesn't have to be boring

iStock

Figuring out the right snack foods in between meals is hard enough for most people, but what if you're one of the 18.8 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with diabetes? The options may seem even more limited. That's why we've put together a list of 15 diabetic-friendly snacking options based on advice from a few experts.

15 Best Snack Foods for Diabetics

iStock

Figuring out the right snack foods in between meals is hard enough for most people, but what if you're one of the 18.8 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with diabetes? The options may seem even more limited. That's why we've put together a list of 15 diabetic-friendly snacking options based on advice from a few experts.

Raw Almonds or Cashews

iStock

Lori Kenyon, certified nutritional consultant, says that raw almonds and cashews are high in protein and fiber, making them a very satisfying treat. One 1-ounce serving, or 24 to 28 medium-sized nuts, has around 170 calories, 5.5 to 8 grams of carbohydrates, and almost no transfat.

Jicama

iStock

Kenyon also recommends jicama to her clients. Jicama is a root vegetable that is super tasty raw or cooked. After peeling, you can slice it into sticks and then refrigerate until cold. Either dash the slices with diced red pepper or hot spices for a kick, dip into salsa or your favorite hummus, or grill or bake it with a little olive oil to make a diabetic-friendly french fry. Eat your fill, since each ounce of jicama has only 11 calories, 2 grams of carbohydrates, and 1 gram of sodium.

Edamame

iStock

Edamame are also a favorite of Kenyon's. She says one 1-ounce serving of this tasty snack has only 34 calories, 1 gram of fat, 3 grams of carbohydrates, 2 milligrams of sodium, and 3 grams of protein. You can boil and eat them alone or toss some into a blender or food processor with a little olive oil and seasonings to make a tasty dip or spread to pair with raw veggies.

Veggie Slices with Dip

iStock

Kenyon says that similar to jicama, zucchini and yellow squash can be sliced like french fries, chilled, and then dipped in salsa or hummus for a tasty treat that satisfies cravings. One cup of yellow squash has 18 calories, 0.2 grams of fat, 3.8 grams of carbohydrates, 2 milligrams of sodium, and 1.37 grams of protein. One tablespoon of salsa adds around 5 calories, 0 grams of fat, 1 gram of carbohydrates, 96 milligrams of sodium, and 1 gram of protein.

Black Bean Salad

If you are hankering for a mini meal, make yourself a salad with plenty of greens, and be sure to add black beans for the filling combination of fiber and protein. Half a cup of the below recipe, added to mixed greens, has 57 calories and 11 grams of carbohydrates.

Rinse a 15-ounce can of low-sodium black beans under running water and drain well. Mix the beans with ½ cup of: chopped tomatoes, chopped cucumber, chopped green bell pepper, and peeled and cubed avocado. Stir in 2 teaspoons fresh lime juice and ¼ teaspoon garlic powder, and season with salt and pepper, to taste.

Olives

iStock

Stella Metsovas, certified clinical nutritionist, recommends olives of all varieties — such as Kalamata olives — as they are perfect options when combined with vegetable sticks. The fiber in the vegetable sticks and fatty acids in the olives are a win-win combination for diabetics.

Shredded Coconut

iStock

Metsovas says that shredded coconut works very well mixed into smoothies, as well as combined with fresh blueberries. Coconut helps maintain consistent blood sugar, and the antioxidants found in blueberries helps with free radical damage caused by high blood sugar.

Whole-Wheat Pretzels

iStock

Angela Shelf Medearis, author of The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook, recommends staving off hunger with this low-calorie snack. According to SelfNutritionData, one 1-ounce serving of whole-wheat pretzels contains just more than 100 calories and only 1 gram of fat. It also contains 3 grams of protein and 2 grams of fiber to help keep you feeling satisfied.

Baked Tortilla or Pita Chips

iStock

So you've made a diabetic-friendly, low-calorie salsa with fresh ingredients. But, what do you do now? Obviously, you'll need to scoop it up with something. Medearis recommends baked tortilla or pita chips, which are lower in fat than their fried counterparts.

Rice Cakes

iStock

Medearis says rice cakes are delicious with low-fat toppings like spicy mustard or salsa.

Popcorn

iStock

Air-popped popcorn is a healthy alternative to regular popcorn. Medearis recommends spicing up air-popped popcorn with a little cayenne or garlic powder.

Cottage Cheese

iStock

Lisa DeFazio, R.D., celebrity diet expert, suggests combining ½ cup cottage cheese with one piece of fruit such as a small banana or nectarine for the perfect combination of carbs, fiber, and protein. She says that about 15 grams of carbohydrates per snack with a little protein and fat is ideal.

High-Fiber Cereal

iStock

DeFazio also suggests high-fiber cereals such as bran flakes or shredded wheat with ½ cup of low-fat milk, perfect for quelling mid-morning hunger pangs.

Greek Yogurt (Pops)

iStock

Stacie Castle, R.D., CDN, has more than 25 years of experience in her field and is co-author of the food journal and nutrition guide Bite It & Write It! One easy-to-make snack that Castle suggests is one 6-ounce container of nonfat Greek yogurt combined with ½ cup blueberries and 1 teaspoon agave syrup for a hint of sweetness without going over the top on calories. You can also blend these ingredients together and freeze into an ice pop for a nice, cool, refreshing treat.

Whole-Wheat Graham Crackers

iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Got the munchies just before bed? It happens to all of us. Castle suggests dipping 1 ½ sheets whole-wheat graham crackers into 4 ounces of 1-percent milk (instead of cookies, of course).


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


30 Snack Ideas for Type 2 Diabetes

Snacking can be tricky when you have type 2 diabetes.

Although you may feel hungry, you don’t want to boost your blood sugars before your next meal. Or, if it’s a bedtime snack you’re craving, a snack could push up your morning readings.

The old advice for people with diabetes was to consume three meals and two snacks. But lately this grazing approach has fallen out of favor with some nutritionists, who realized that some people took that advice as a license to eat what amounted to six meals.

However, sometimes you need to nosh. Over the past 25+ years living with type 2, I’ve learned what snacks can satisfy me without wreaking havoc with my glucose readings. The principles for my snacks are the same: if I eat something with carbs, I counteract with protein. A little fat is ok, since it gives me a boost in energy. And before I eat, I try to remember to drink a glass of water, because sometimes I mistake thirst for hunger, and it’s good to stay hydrated.

Keeping in mind every case of diabetes is unique, here are 30 snacks that work for me:

2. String cheese and a half cup of blueberries

3. A Glucerna minibar and a warm drink

4. A half cup of plain Greek yogurt mixed with two tablespoons of homemade granola

5. Two sugarless fudgesicle bars

6. Ten baby carrots and two tablespoons of hummus

7. Two bagel thins and an ounce of lox

8. One ounce of hard cheese with six small rosemary raisin crackers

9. A handful of peanuts (just a handful)

10. Three cups of air-popped popcorn sprinkled with garlic salt and cumin

11. A half cup of low-sugar, low-fat ice cream

12. A cup of raspberries and two tablespoons of whipped cream

13. Sugarless Jell-O with a little whipped cream

14. Two cups of chopped salad – cucumbers, parsley, tomatoes and red onion with a smidgen of feta

15. Two figs and one ounce of brie cheese

16. A slice of Ezekiel bread with a half tablespoon of butter

17. A berry parfait with a mix of berries and Greek yogurt mixed with vanilla

18. A hard boiled egg and celery sticks

19. A small stir-fry of low carb vegetables (if I’m really hungry)

20. Five shrimp with two tablespoons of sauce

21. A two egg white scramble with spinach

23. Half of an almond nut butter and no sugar jelly sandwich on low glycemic bread

24. One piece of dark chocolate, eaten slowly

25. A small antipasto of two grilled artichoke hearts, roasted pepper, 6 black olives and one thin slice of mozzarella

26. A small bowl of tzatziki (Greek yogurt mixed with chopped cucumber, garlic and dill) and sliced cucumbers

27. Eggplant rollups: broiled slices of eggplant wrapped around a thin slice of provolone cheese and a sundried tomato

28. One small homemade oatmeal raisin cookie

29. One half cut of cottage cheese and sliced radishes, cucumbers and baby carrots

30. A small box of raisins mixed with two tablespoons of cashews

As always, you should check with your nutritionist (and your blood glucose machine) to make sure that these snacks are right for you.

Ilene Raymond Rush is an award winning health and science freelance writer. Based on her own experiences with type 2 diabetes, she brings a personal take and a reporter’s eye to examine the best and newest methods of treating and controlling the disease.

More from the Diabetes Blog

After a Disappointing A1c Result, 5 Things I'm Doing to Get Back on Track

Ilene's recent test results were higher than usual here's what she's doing to rebound.

When Loved Ones Nag You About Your Blood Sugar

In my struggle to manage my own diabetes, I have found ways for friends and family members to help me out-- that won’t make me see red.

Latest Blog Posts on WebMD

What I've Learned on My Treatment Journey

A patient shares insights from her years of DVT treatment.

Is It Time for a Pain Management Reboot?

Coming out of the pandemic, it's time to reflect on lessons learned and make some changes.

Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD Blogs are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. Blogs are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.

Do not consider WebMD Blogs as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on WebMD. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. WebMD understands that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource, but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or dial 911 immediately.


Watch the video: 15 Best Balinese Food. Local Foods You Must Try When Visiting Bali (December 2021).