Traditional recipes

Fruit: eat the rainbow

Fruit: eat the rainbow


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In the world of fruit there are so many varieties to choose from – each with their own distinct flavour, aroma, texture and nutritional qualities – that there’s really no excuse for eating the same old types, week-in, week-out.

14 healthy ways to use fruit

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Charred eggy bread with strawberries and honey

With a good dollop of ricotta

Enjoy this twist on classic French toast with limoncello for an indulgent breakfast or sweet treat

Fruit can be a snack, a dessert, take the starring role in salad, flavour drinks, be used to make meats sing and so much more besides.

Different coloured fruits offer different groups of nutrients, which further highlights the importance of a balanced, varied diet. To make sure you’re getting all the essential vitamins and minerals that fruit can offer, you really do need to, as the saying goes, ‘eat the rainbow’!

Fruit is at its best when eaten in season – just when it’s at its most juicy, ripe and sweet. So whether it’s plums in the autumn, peaches in the summer or apples in the winter, mix up the fruit you eat each week to make sure you get a good balance, and more of the nutrients you need in your diet.

In terms of cooking, certain fruits are better suited to certain methods of cooking than others: pears are delicious when poached, for example; grilled peaches make a salad into a real star and apples are wonderful when stewed.

In the UK we should all be aiming to eat a minimum of five portions of fruit and veg a day. In Australia, though, it’s seven portions! It may sound a lot, but if you can get one portion in at each meal and a couple of portions as snacks, you’re heading towards hitting that target. All fruit counts towards your 5-a-day – whether fresh, tinned or frozen – just make sure it doesn’t make up all 5 portions – you need plenty of vegetables in there, too. A good balance to aim for is two fruit and three veg portions each day, as fruit typically contains more sugar, and even though it’s natural sugar, it’s still wise to keep an eye on how much you’re getting in your diet.

Jamie has a number of recipes that will help you to embrace and celebrate all kinds of fruit. Kick start the day with this Kiwi, ginger & banana smoothie that both kids and grown-ups will love. His recipe for Box grater fruit salad makes for a great (and so-simple) dessert or snack. It would also make a great start to the day – serve a little on top of porridge with yoghurt for a brilliant balanced breakfast.

Or try this colourful and flavoursome Blackened chicken that’s quick to rustle up as a midweek meal.

Fruit is also delicious in drinks, and this recipe for a slushie makes the most of strawberries and their natural sweetness, without the need to add any extra sugar. So embrace fruit, and make it a regular feature of your mealtimes!


What is "Eat the Rainbow"?

Red, orange, yellow, green, and blue/purple are the five colours of the food rainbow and each one contains phytonutrients with specific health functions.

If you think eating the rainbow means gobbling a load of multicoloured sweets, then you are quite mistaken. Instead, we’re talking about the vibrant plant's mother nature intended for us to eat. That’s right, plant-based foods like fruits and vegetables have many health properties.

Kiwis are a heart-healthy green food

Have you ever wondered why plant foods are so vibrant and appealing? Well, these pigments serve many purposes. For a start, these colourful pigments are attractive to other species, including human beings, who think they look good enough to eat. And then there are the bees who pollinate the plants by the power of colour (fun fact - bees love the colour blue).

These pigments aren’t just for show, they also serve as defence mechanisms. For example, some of the pigments deter invaders from eating them by releasing antibacterial solutions and bitter tastes to put them off. The health benefits of plant foods come from these phytochemicals, notably their potential for disease prevention.

When it comes to green foods, their naturally-occurring nutrients are renowned for their ability to support several different aspects of heart health. You’ve probably already heard of polyphenols and their antioxidant powers, but there are others too!

Polyphenols are the micronutrients that occur naturally in edible plants that are good for the body and your gut microbiome. Read about them here.

What is oxidative stress?

If your body has an imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants, then it is experiencing oxidative stress. Eating the right foods is the best way to combat it.


Red Foods: Guide To Health Facts, Food Lists And Recipes

When there are too many free radicals for your body to deal with, they overwhelm its natural repair system. Therefore, oxidative damage is to blame for many chronic illnesses. Reactive oxygen species also contribute to ageing (and the gradual tissue and organ function degeneration that comes with it).

So, when there is an imbalance, the free radicals begin damaging DNA, proteins, and fatty tissue which make up a major part of the human body. Damage to these leads to disease. Fortunately, antioxidants (like those found in rainbow foods) can donate an electron to lonely free radicals, thus preventing oxidative stress and cellular damage.

FACT☝The body naturally produces free radicals as a result of exercise and inflammation. When balance is maintained, it’s a healthy function.


Orange and Yellow Shakeology Recipes

5. Carrot Cake Smoothie

This yummy carrot cake-inspired shake features four plant-based add-ins — carrot, pineapple, walnuts, and cinnamon — to make you feel like a superachiever.

If your blender can’t handle raw carrots, buy them shredded or steam ahead of time.

6. Shakeology Pumpkin Pie Chia Pudding

Does it have to be fall to enjoy pumpkin? Not in our book. If you’ve never had chia pudding, you’re in for a treat.

It’s creamy, satisfying, and easy to meal prep. This dessert recipe combines spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, and ginger with Vanilla Whey Shakeology, pureed pumpkin, maple syrup, chopped pecans, and chia seeds, of course!

It’s got about 16 g fiber and 10 g of protein per serving and is totally delish.

7. Mango Orange Turmeric Shakeology

This highly rated recipe proves you don’t have to be afraid of using spices in your smoothie. If turmeric isn’t your thing, try ginger instead.

8. Cantaloupe Creme Shakeology

Cantaloupe and other melons are sweet fruits that can easily mask the flavor of veggies (assuming you don’t want to taste them).

Though it doesn’t call for it, try adding half a cup of frozen cauliflower rice to this creamy, sweet concoction. You’ll never even notice it.

9. Sunflower Shakeology

This sweet and delightful summer smoothie is like sunshine in a glass. Made with pineapple, golden raisins, and sunflower seeds, it’s rich, creamy, and delicious.

Pro tip: Soak your raisins in warm water and blend first with liquid to avoid chunks.

Add in a ½ cup of chopped baby summer squash for a dose of yellow veggies.


“Eat the Rainbow!” Fruit and Veggie Challenge

By now, you have likely been told to “eat more fruits and vegetables” countless times by friends, doctors, dietitians, etc. But have they ever explained why eating more fruits and vegetables is beneficial for a cancer survivor? What about how to add more fruits and vegetables into your diet? Lastly, with all of the conflicting nutrition information out there, how are you supposed to tell what is a myth versus what is a fact?

In this 12-week series, we will do all of that for you! We are going to:

  • Explain why fruits and vegetables are important for cancer survivors
  • Help you increase the amount of fruits and vegetables in your diet
  • Bust some common myths about fruits and vegetables

Every week, you will receive an email containing some great information as well as a delicious and easy recipe highlighting different fruits and vegetables.

You will also be given a weekly challenge to complete to help you on your journey to eating more fruits and vegetables. Give each challenge a try, and you can choose to record your progress on our fruit & veggie tracker or share your results in our Facebook group!

Complete all 12 weeks of the challenge and fill out the final quiz to receive a free recipe ebook containing all of the delicious recipes from the challenge!

While you’re waiting for the challenge to officially start, we recommend that you check out Julie’s recorded webinars and


Recipes for Eating the Rainbow

A study by the Centers for Disease Control shows that 60 percent of children and 18 percent of adults aren’t getting enough fruit each day, and worse: 93 percent of children and 83 percent of adults are deficient in veggies. According to new research, the USDA recommendation of four to six servings of produce each day is too conservative to achieve protective health benefits in fact, research has shown you need to eat more than seven servings of fruits and veggies daily to reduce your risk of death by at least 23 percent.

Key to getting the biggest benefit from a diet rich in produce is eating the rainbow. Meals featuring bright and varied colors indicate a wide variety of nutrients. Produce like cruciferous vegetables (broccoli), berries, and nitric oxide-rich vegetables like beets are great options. But telling you to add colorful produce to your diet is one thing. Doing it, making it fun and delicious, and getting your kids to eat it is another challenge.

I’ve put together a collection of fun recipes that encourage you to eat the rainbow. They’re easy to put together, appealing to kids, delicious and nutritious.


These baked oat and fruit bars are a homemade version of the cereal bars you might be used to eating for breakfast. Feel free to use whatever flavor of jam you prefer or make your own jam using a mixture of your favorite fruits.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup whole-wheat flour
  • ¾ cup old-fashioned oats
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup butter, chopped
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 tablespoons plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons honey or agave
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup homemade or organic fruit jam
  • Almond milk, as needed

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Whisk together the whole-wheat flour, oats, cinnamon, and salt in a mixing bowl.
  3. Cut in the butter with a fork or pastry cutter until a crumbled mixture forms.
  4. In a separate bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, yogurt, honey, and vanilla until well blended.
  5. Stir the wet ingredients into the dry then add water 1 tablespoon at a time until the mixture comes together into a ball of dough.
  6. Turn out the dough onto a floured surface and roll it to 1/8-inch thickness.
  7. Cut the dough into rectangles about 4-by-4.5 inches.
  8. Spoon a tablespoon of jam into the middle of each square, brush the edges with almond milk.
  9. Fold the long sides together and pinch them together in the middle, sealing the dough.
  10. Pinch the edges together to seal the dough then turn it seam-side down on the baking sheet.
  11. Cover the baking sheet and freeze for 10 minutes then brush the tops with almond milk.
  12. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes until the tops are lightly browned then cool for 10 minutes.
  13. Store the bars in a lidded glass container between sheets of parchment.

Eat the Rainbow: The Science Behind Brightly Colored Summer Fruit and Why It’s So Good for You

Unicorn trends may come and go, but there will always be something appealing about brightly colored food, especially if the vibrant hues are all-natural. There are plenty of gems studding the stereotypical beige bleakness of the winter food scene, but summer definitely brings a broader and brighter rainbow of produce, from sunset-colored peaches to crimson tomatoes—the fruit family being particularly striking. We know we love them as much for their looks as for their taste, but what makes these summer fruits so bright and beautiful in the first place?

Pride eats Five Queer Restaurants to Try in June (Pride Month) Well, it depends on the color—different naturally occurring substances account for specific pigments in a range of fruits and vegetables, and those pigments are further influenced by pH levels in each individual fruit, so we get a wide spectrum of shades even within one color family. Per a 2010 paper from UC Davis, “The primary pigments imparting color quality [to fruits and vegetables] are the fat soluble chlorophylls (green) and carotenoids (yellow, orange, and red) and the water soluble anthocyanins (red, blue), flavonoids (yellow), and betalains (red).”

Many fruits and vegetables contain more than one of these compounds too, and all in different concentrations, but in a general sense, here are the major players responsible for the vibrant palette that paints our summer fruit, which also happens to benefit our health as well as our sensibilities.

Lycopene = Red and Pink

Examples: watermelon, tomatoes, papaya

Lycopene is actually a type of carotenoid (more on those a little later on), but it’s responsible for the vivid pink-red flesh of most watermelons, as well as the red in tomatoes—which, as you may remember, are also a fruit. Of course, there’s practically an entire rainbow of tomato shades alone, but the classic crimson beefsteak, and all other red tomato varieties, are the ones containing this compound.

Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that has been shown to have a host of health benefits, including helping to prevent heart disease and certain cancers. Why not double up on both the benefits and the taste with our Watermelon, Tomato, and Kalamata Olive Salad?

Chef'n Watermelon Slicester, $7.99 from Williams Sonoma

For getting every bit of that juicy red flesh.

Anthocyanins and Betacyanins = Red, Blue, Purple, and Magenta

Examples: raspberries, strawberries, cherries, blueberries, blackberries, dragon fruit

Tom Baker / EyeEm / Getty Images

Anthocyanins are named for a combination of the Greek words for “dark blue” and “flowers”—and they are responsible for deep blue and purple pigments in many fruits, but they also cause bright red colors, like in raspberries. The pH levels of different fruits determine the exact shade expressed, but regardless of the color, these compounds are also antioxidants that may help prevent cancer and improve brain function. They’re often used as natural food coloring for things like blue tortilla chips, jelly beans, and fruit soda. In their original packaging (aka whole, fresh fruits and veggies), we like them any way we can get them—eaten as-is, of course, but also in fruit salad, on flatbread, in salsa, or even grilled, whether for dinner or dessert.

Related Reading: The Ultimate Guide to Picking, Purchasing & Preparing Summer Berries

Closely related to anthocyanins are betacyanins (a type of betalain, which you may recall from the UC Davis run-down earlier). These are found in plants of the Caryophyllales family, including beets, carnations (which can be eaten if free of pesticides), cacti (many of which produce edible fruit), and pitaya, or dragon fruit.

Some dragon fruit flesh is snow white, but some is bright magenta. Unlike with berries, you can’t easily tell what you’re getting by looking at the outside of this one both the fuchsia-fleshed and white-fleshed varieties are neon pink outside, though some sources say the pink-fleshed ones are generally smaller. Thanks to the rising/enduring popularity of smoothies and açaí bowls, you may be able to find the magenta dragon fruit flesh in the freezer section of your store all year long, and you’ll probably see the fresh fruit year-round too, but the natural growing season starts in midsummer, so we’re counting it here along with more familiar summer fruits. (And there are just as many great things to do with dragon fruit.)

Carotenoids = Orange and Yellow

Examples: yellow peaches, mangoes, cantaloupe, apricots, nectarines


12 Rainbow Food Ideas Just in Time for Pride Month

Every June, rainbow flags adorn streets worldwide and lively parades take over entire city blocks. The iconic rainbows celebrate Pride Month, honoring the LGBTQ+ community.

Pride Month is the perfect time to honor not just the important historical events in the LGBTQ+ community, but inclusion and equality as well. What better way to celebrate diversity than with an array of rainbow-colored Pride Month recipes?

VEGAN RAINBOW SANDWICH COOKIES

These psychedelic treats are everything. You’ll make long “ropes” of vegan shortbread dough in varying colors before combining them to form a log. Then chill in the fridge, bake, and you’re well on your way to groovy sandwich cookies, with the help of Duncan Hines ® Creamy Vanilla Frosting and rainbow sprinkles.

RAINBOW CUPCAKES

Cupcakes make it easy for everyone to grab their own little mini treat. These adorable confections make a loud statement all on their own, but you can crown them with Duncan Hines Creamy Vanilla Frosting and rainbow-colored sprinkles for an extra pop.

RAINBOW LAYER CAKE

Is there anything more festive (and impressive!) than a six-layer rainbow cake? This dessert may look like a lot of work, but Duncan Hines Classic White Cake Mix keeps things simple. At first glance, it looks like a basic white cake, but your guests will be dazzled once you cut it to reveal the rainbow layers!

RED VELVET DONUTS

Are donuts more your thing? With Duncan Hines Red Velvet Cake Mix, it’s surprisingly easy to whip up a big batch of them. Simply make a quick mix, and then pipe it into a donut pan before baking. The rich red color is vibrant on its own, but you can boost the rainbow factor for Pride by topping the donuts with colorful frostings, sprinkles, or candies.

BIRTHDAY CAKE PUDDING CUPS

For a simple no-bake treat option that will please every palate, you can't go wrong with these colorful deconstructed cake pudding cups. Add as many rainbow sprinkles as you'd like (the more the better!) and top with Reddi-wip ® Original. Don’t just save ’em for birthdays—you can spice up these cake pudding cups up for Pride Month by adding one or two drops of food coloring to the vanilla pudding. Use different colors to create a rainbow-colored work of art!

RAINBOW PUPPY CHOW SNACK MIX

Part salty, part sweet, and 100% portable. This Pride Month treat knows how to party. Crispy cereal and pretzels shake things up with melty chocolate, creamy peanut butter, and colored candy melts for an addicting snack you can’t get enough of.

RAINBOW FRUIT SALAD

Fresh, zesty, and fun—what more could you want from a Pride Month snack? Cool off with this juicy blend of fresh fruit topped with a honey-lime vinaigrette, chopped mint, and fluffy clouds of Reddi-wip Original.

CHEESECAKE FRUIT DIP

Kabobs made with colorful, seasonal fruit team up with Snack Pack ® Vanilla Pudding, cream cheese, and Reddi-wip for a rainbow food idea that's a breeze to prepare and tons of fun to eat. Use strawberries, blueberries, cantaloupe, green and purple grapes, and pineapple to create delicious edible rainbows. This fruit dip is great for sharing with others, but it also makes for a nice little weeknight treat.

VEGGIE SPRING ROLLS WITH SPICY PEANUT SAUCE

You'll need some veggies to balance out all those sugary sweets. This fun appetizer seems fancy, but it's super simple to put together—and healthy to boot! Fresh, crunchy bell peppers, carrots, and cucumbers are sweetened up with mango and fresh mint before being wrapped in rice paper and served with a warm peanut sauce made with Earth Balance ® Creamy Peanut & Coconut Oil Spread. They’re the perfect Pride Day snack, thanks to all the colorful veggies. Consider adding shredded purple cabbage for even more colorful crunch.

MEDITERRANEAN PASTA SALAD

This flavorful side salad gets its color from rainbow rotini pasta, red tomatoes, and lots of fresh green veggies. As a bonus, you likely already have most of the ingredients on hand, like Wish-Bone ® Balsamic Vinaigrette Dressing and Hunt's ® Fire Roasted Diced Tomatoes.

RANCH CHICKEN SALAD LETTUCE WRAPS

This light dish can be prepped ahead of time and works well as a shared appetizer, or even as a quick lunch or dinner. Healthy Choice ® Garden Ranch Dressing adds a punch of flavor, while fresh yellow and red cherry tomatoes, purple onions, and bright green avocados add a pop of color. Serve alongside fresh fruit for a complete rainbow meal.

ONE-POT RAINBOW ZOODLE PASTA

Knock out your daily veggie intake with this colorful pasta dish. This simple yet flavor-forward entrée requires little more than zucchinis and cherry tomatoes, fresh basil, and Earth Balance Soy Free Buttery Spread. The best part? This dinner comes together in 25 minutes flat.

From snacks to sweet treats and all kinds of vibrant goodies in between, these rainbow food ideas are made to put a smile on your face and help you celebrate Pride Month in style. The sky's the limit when it comes to color, so don't be afraid to use your imagination!


Eat the Rainbow: The Science Behind Brightly Colored Summer Fruit and Why It’s So Good for You

Unicorn trends may come and go, but there will always be something appealing about brightly colored food, especially if the vibrant hues are all-natural. There are plenty of gems studding the stereotypical beige bleakness of the winter food scene, but summer definitely brings a broader and brighter rainbow of produce, from sunset-colored peaches to crimson tomatoes—the fruit family being particularly striking. We know we love them as much for their looks as for their taste, but what makes these summer fruits so bright and beautiful in the first place?

Pride eats Five Queer Restaurants to Try in June (Pride Month) Well, it depends on the color—different naturally occurring substances account for specific pigments in a range of fruits and vegetables, and those pigments are further influenced by pH levels in each individual fruit, so we get a wide spectrum of shades even within one color family. Per a 2010 paper from UC Davis, “The primary pigments imparting color quality [to fruits and vegetables] are the fat soluble chlorophylls (green) and carotenoids (yellow, orange, and red) and the water soluble anthocyanins (red, blue), flavonoids (yellow), and betalains (red).”

Many fruits and vegetables contain more than one of these compounds too, and all in different concentrations, but in a general sense, here are the major players responsible for the vibrant palette that paints our summer fruit, which also happens to benefit our health as well as our sensibilities.

Lycopene = Red and Pink

Examples: watermelon, tomatoes, papaya

Lycopene is actually a type of carotenoid (more on those a little later on), but it’s responsible for the vivid pink-red flesh of most watermelons, as well as the red in tomatoes—which, as you may remember, are also a fruit. Of course, there’s practically an entire rainbow of tomato shades alone, but the classic crimson beefsteak, and all other red tomato varieties, are the ones containing this compound.

Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant that has been shown to have a host of health benefits, including helping to prevent heart disease and certain cancers. Why not double up on both the benefits and the taste with our Watermelon, Tomato, and Kalamata Olive Salad?

Chef'n Watermelon Slicester, $7.99 from Williams Sonoma

For getting every bit of that juicy red flesh.

Anthocyanins and Betacyanins = Red, Blue, Purple, and Magenta

Examples: raspberries, strawberries, cherries, blueberries, blackberries, dragon fruit

Tom Baker / EyeEm / Getty Images

Anthocyanins are named for a combination of the Greek words for “dark blue” and “flowers”—and they are responsible for deep blue and purple pigments in many fruits, but they also cause bright red colors, like in raspberries. The pH levels of different fruits determine the exact shade expressed, but regardless of the color, these compounds are also antioxidants that may help prevent cancer and improve brain function. They’re often used as natural food coloring for things like blue tortilla chips, jelly beans, and fruit soda. In their original packaging (aka whole, fresh fruits and veggies), we like them any way we can get them—eaten as-is, of course, but also in fruit salad, on flatbread, in salsa, or even grilled, whether for dinner or dessert.

Related Reading: The Ultimate Guide to Picking, Purchasing & Preparing Summer Berries

Closely related to anthocyanins are betacyanins (a type of betalain, which you may recall from the UC Davis run-down earlier). These are found in plants of the Caryophyllales family, including beets, carnations (which can be eaten if free of pesticides), cacti (many of which produce edible fruit), and pitaya, or dragon fruit.

Some dragon fruit flesh is snow white, but some is bright magenta. Unlike with berries, you can’t easily tell what you’re getting by looking at the outside of this one both the fuchsia-fleshed and white-fleshed varieties are neon pink outside, though some sources say the pink-fleshed ones are generally smaller. Thanks to the rising/enduring popularity of smoothies and açaí bowls, you may be able to find the magenta dragon fruit flesh in the freezer section of your store all year long, and you’ll probably see the fresh fruit year-round too, but the natural growing season starts in midsummer, so we’re counting it here along with more familiar summer fruits. (And there are just as many great things to do with dragon fruit.)

Carotenoids = Orange and Yellow

Examples: yellow peaches, mangoes, cantaloupe, apricots, nectarines


Easy Summer Fruit Salad Recipe:

Fresh Fruit Salad made with tropical fruits made possible by the shipping industry.
  • Avocado chunks
  • Papaya
  • Fresh Pineapple Chunks
  • Mango
  • Dill (if you have it.)

It's a no-brainer:

It's sweet and juicy big bowl of Yum! With all the flavors mixed in, it's like eating fruits in the tropics without packing bags and hopping on a jet plane to get to those far off places. It's a taste of tropical paradise all in a simple fruit salad. 

The THING about fruits:

Ripe persimmons sliced and arranged nice and pretty on a platter. These guys show up in the winter for a perfect fruit platter.

Just wash them or peel and eat. You don't have to go crazy preparing, slicing, dicing, sauteing, boiling and simmering the heck out of your food. Prep up some easy fruit salad recipe and get back on with life.

Fruits are kind to the digestive system and nothing will get stuck in your teeth!

Say, persimmons for example: This fruit is just like sweet pudding when it gets really soft and ripe. Sometimes, I even dream about it, like eating it in my sleep, oh yeah. I'm definitely a fruit bat.

There's nothing like a big bowl of a fresh fruit salad. It's the easiest to make. Make it one of your top 10 list in your vegetarian diet recipes and you'll lose the weight without feeling blah. There's no cooking here. Just pick your favorite fruits, assemble and feast on them. 

Fruit Salads are one the best vegetarian meals you can count on. No need to keep looking for a low fat vegetarian recipe. Anꃪsy fruit salad recipe like will do. 


Watch the video: Phytochemicals: Why You Should Eat A Rainbow of Fruits and Veggies (May 2022).